Ewch i’r prif gynnwys

Newyddion

Cardiff University researchers will discover public perceptions of the recent horse meat scandal for the first time by analysing social media data.

The horse meat scandal last year revealed a major breakdown in the traceability of the food supply chain and the adulteration of meat. The extensive media coverage revealed not only widespread fraud but also the complexity of the UK meat supply chain and the extent of meat imports.

The project will investigate how the growing complexity of international food supply chains is giving rise to a new generation of risks and concerns. 

The University's Collaborative Online Social Media Observatory (COSMOS) has been awarded an Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) grant under their Global Food Security Programme; a joint initiative with the Food Standards Agency (FSA). The project is in collaboration with NatCen, the University of Warwick and the University of Westminster. 

Dr Luke Sloan from the Cardiff School of Social Sciences, said: "We are delighted to be working on this trail-blazing project funded under the Understanding the Challenges of the UK Food System call. The research will generate new empirical findings on public perceptions of UK food supply chains, what people's concerns are, what influences these and how they may be best managed in the future."

Dr Matthew Williams, who was recently appointed to the ESRC's Social Media Experts working group to represent COSMOS, said: "We are honoured to be part of the Global Food Security Programme and look forward to deploying the COSMOS platform and lending our social science expertise in relation to big data to this innovative project." 

The project team are Dr Luke Sloan, Dr Matthew Williams (COSMOS, Cardiff School of Social Sciences), Dr Pete Burnap (COSMOS, Cardiff School of Computer Science and Informatics), Caireen Roberts (NatCen), Professor Elizabeth Dowler (University of Warwick) and Dr Alizon Draper (University of Westminster).

Find out more about COSMOS online, on Twitter @cosmos_project or email the team at:cosmosprojectuk@gmail.com

Four Cardiff research projects will be showcased this week at the Arts and Humanities Research Council's (AHRC) 'Connected Communities Festival'.

Visitors to the two-day Festival, which is free and open to the public, will be able to take part in archaeological digs, watch film screenings and musical performances, visit a pop-up community news café, participate in a banner procession, attend workshops and debates and much more.

Professor Mark Llewellyn, Director of Research for the Arts and Humanities Research Council, commented : "We're delighted that the Festival is taking place in Wales and that a key focus will be Welsh community life, the rich and vital work of community groups in Wales and their many exciting collaborations with academic researchers."

The Connected Communities programme is designed to help understand the changing nature of communities in their historical and cultural contexts and the role of communities in sustaining and enhancing quality of life. The programme seeks not only to connect research on communities, but to connect communities with research.

The AHRC 'Connected Communities Festival 2014' takes place on July 1stand 2nd at two main locations – St David's Hotel and Motorpoint Arena - with other fringe venues at the Norwegian Church, the Pierhead Building and Butetown Arts Centre.

Connected Communities

The Festival is free and open to the public. A live stream of festival activities will be available for people who are unable to attend the event and you can follow @ahrcpress on Twitter and #ahrccc for regular updates.

Cardiff University projects taking part in the festival are:

Performing Abergavenny (School of Social Sciences)

For the past year 'Performing Abergavenny' has used a pioneering mix of performance, digital media and community consultation to engage the different communities of Abergavenny and has empowered local people so that they can play an intrinsic part in policy making.

In partnership with the Royal Central School of Speech and Drama, the project has utilised theatre performances by professional actors, commissioned a music video featuring people and businesses from across the town, enlisted the help of volunteers to produce large civic artworks and used social media and digital marketing to gain feedback and opinions from residents about the history and future of Abergavenny.

'Performing Abergavenny' will be holding two breakout sessions during the Festival and presenting the research findings to politicians, community groups, third sector organisations and Welsh media using performances, debates, video and digital media.

Creative Citizens (School of Journalism, Media and Cultural Studies)

Media, Community and the Creative Citizen is a research project involving six universities, academics from a dozen disciplines and six partners ranging in scale from Ofcom to South Blessed, a creative studio run by a young entrepreneur in St Paul's Bristol. It aims to explore how creative citizenship generates value for communities against a changing media landscape.

As part of the Festival, there will be a photographic and an artefact exhibition, a breakout session to discuss the role of creative citizens in the future of community life in Wales and the policies needed to support them. Themes will include: the future of community media; planning and communities and the role of creative networks.

There will also be a pop-up Community News Café hosted by community journalists, an interactive wall to capture ongoing interactive discussions and an exhibition stand displaying films on the locations and themes of the project.

Digging Caerau (School of History, Archaeology and Religion)

The Caerau And Ely Rediscovering (CAER) Heritage Project is a collaborative project based around one of Cardiff's most important, but little-known, archaeological sites, Caerau Iron Age hill fort. It seeks to engage local people and school children in their shared history and help challenge marginalisation.

The project recently won the History and Heritage prize as well as the overall national prize at the National Coordinating Centre for Public Engagement's Engage Competition out of 230 high calibre entries from across the UK.

Visitors will have the opportunity to participate in the archaeological excavations at Caerau hill fort throughout the festival which marks the start of the second season of community excavations taking place over a four week period.

The CAER Team will have a stand at the Festival which will include an interactive virtual dig that brings the off-site hill fort excavation to the heart of the Festival. There will also be an interactive photo exhibition at St Fagans National History Museum and screenings of the 'Caeraustock' film produced from footage gathered at the 2013 excavations (displayed at the exhibition stand, Caerau hill fort and St Fagans).

A shuttle bus from St David's Hotel to Caerau Hill fort and St Fagans will be available every 40 minutes for the duration of the festival.

Representing Communities (School of Social Sciences)

Representing Communities is a three-year research project exploring the role of the arts and humanities as forms of expression that can better represent people's everyday lives, histories and hopes. The focus is on the health and wellbeing of people living in communities often seen only in terms of their negative attributes. The project is based in five case studies in the UK: north Merthyr Tydfil, Butetown in Cardiff, Hodge Hill in Birmingham, Dennistoun in Glasgow and Cromarty in the Scottish Highlands.

At the Festival there will be a banner procession starting at Bute Park and proceeding along the Taff Trail to Cardiff Bay. The banners have been developed through creative workshops with school pupils and a senior citizens group. The procession will be an explosion of song and dance with more than 150 community members taking part. There will also be musical performances in the Millennium Centre by school pupils who have composed a song, plus an exhibition of banners used by communities in South Wales through history.

Festival delegates are also welcome to come along on Tuesday for an evening of performance, reminiscing and sharing at a special event (in partnership with National Theatre Wales) which focuses on older African Caribbean people who live, socialise or have special memories of Butetown.

A new all-Wales network to improve the health of school children is being launched today (Thursday 5 June 2014). Based on a Canadian model, the School Health Research Network (SHRN) aims to gather good-quality data on children's health to address issues such as obesity, smoking and physical activity.

Delegates from secondary schools across the country will attend the launch at Cardiff's City Hall.

Led by Cardiff University, the SHRN is a network of nearly 70 secondary schools across Wales who have joined forces with researchers and other organisations supporting young people's health to increase the quality, quantity and relevance of school-based health improvement research in Wales.

Professor Simon Murphy, from Cardiff University's School of Social Sciences, said: "The Schools Health Research Network is an exciting new initiative funded by the MRC. It brings together policy makers, public health practitioners, teachers, parents, pupils and academics to identify health needs, promote evidence based practice, and identify emerging research questions that are important to schools. This continuous cycle of collaboration offers a real opportunity to target resources in a more cost effective manner and to address some of the key public health challenges of our time such as smoking, alcohol misuse, diet and activity and emotional well-being."

The Network is based on a model pioneered by Professor Steve Manske at the University of Waterloo in southern Ontario. The School Health Action Planning and Evaluation System (SHAPES) has been adopted across Canada, helping to identify health trends.

Professor Manske said: "I am delighted to be invited to Wales to share our knowledge of how we've used good data on children's health in schools to help tackle issues including childhood obesity, lack of exercise, and smoking. The model we developed in southern Ontario, SHAPES, has been used in more than 3500 schools across Canada. SHAPES - the School Health Action, Planning and Evaluation System - collects health and education information from students and staff to create computer-generated, custom health profiles for schools, helping to identify trends and point the way to improving the success of school communities. Provinces, health regions, school boards and evaluators across Canada have all made use of SHAPES to guide program planning and help turn policy into action. I hope my work with the School Health Research Network can bring real benefits to wider society in Wales by improving the health of future generations."

Professor Manske's research led to the development of a 'Healthy School Planner' (HSP), a free, on-line tool that allows Canadian schools to assess the health of their school. SHRN aims to develop a similar approach in Wales, helping schools assess how well they are tackling a range of measures including physical exercise, smoking and obesity.

Minister for Health and Social Services, Mark Drakeford AM, has launched a new research centre at Cardiff University that will focus on children's social care in Wales.

Covering support to families, child protection, children in care and adoption; the Children's Social Care Research and Development Centre (CASCADE) is the only centre of its kind in Wales. 

It brings together more than £1.35 million of current research grants and is led by Dr Sally Holland, a leading researcher in social work and child welfare based at the School of Social Sciences.

Its principal aim is to improve the well-being and safety of children and their families by generating primary research evidence of an internationally recognised high quality.

Mark Drakeford AM officially launched CASCADE and in his talk explained how the centre is an excellent example of co-production, which here involves seeking the expertise of citizens who use social services and involving them in the research process from the beginning.

"CASCADE is a real example of how co-production is put into practice. Work at the centre will be connected to the life and work of the community in which it is based.

"The work in our universities really makes a difference to policy-making and CASCADE is going to be an important player in social work policy in Wales" Mr Drakeford added.

Speaking at the launch, Dr Holland said: "CASCADE is about research informed practice and practice informed research. Our young people's advisory group CASCADE Voices informs our research questions and research designs and our relationship with the Care Council for Wales means that all registered social workers and social care workers will have access to our research findings."

Lisa Armstrong, a member of CASCADE Voices, spoke at the launch about how the group members gain from their involvement with the university through being valued and listened to while learning new skills.

Find out more about CASCADE at http://sites.cardiff.ac.uk/cascade/ and follow on Twitter @CASCADEresearch.

Scientists studying the social media activity in the immediate aftermath of Lee Rigby's murder have found that messages loaded with racial tension and hate were far less likely to spread than those infused with love.

By collecting half a million tweets related to the attack via Twitter, academics from the University's Collaborative Online Social Media Observatory (COSMOS) were able to statistically model how the public reacted and have published their findings in the international peer-reviewed journal Social Network Analysis and Mining. The authors were particularlyinterested in identifying the tweets that were most likely to spread following the event.

"The results were surprising, and did not support the common conception that social media platforms are havens for those spreading hateful and social disruptive online content," said Dr Matthew Williams, from the School of Social Sciences.

"To the contrary, we found that tweets that included high levels of racial tension, such as those spreading hateful content towards those of Muslim faith, were statistically less likely to be retweeted than messages containing positive sentiment, such as tweets of good-wishes to the family of Lee Rigby," he added.

Messages of love, the academics found, were statistically more likely to be frequently retweeted and form large and long lasting information flows. This was based on a methodology that focused on the emotive content of messages such as negative and positive sentiment, and racial tension, as well as content linking features within messages, such as hashtags and URLs.

Dr Pete Burnap from the School of Computer Science and Informatics said:

"Social media has often been associated with the spread of malicious and antagonistic content that could pose a potential risk to community relations.  We frequently hear about trolling and social media being used to harass members of the public or certain groups in society. However, this research provides some evidence that suggests it is actually the more positive and supportive messages that spread to a significant extent following events of this nature."

The findings are the first to indicate that social media platforms, in particular Twitter, may self-regulate, stemming the flow of negative and hateful information following terrorist and similar events of national interest.  The next phase of the research for the COSMOS team is to investigate if and how social media users engage in counter speech, to stem the spread of negativity online.

Dr Williams continued: "Social scientists at Cardiff University have been conducting research into how people behave online for over three decades.  Some of this work on virtual communities has shown how self-regulation, or what criminologists have called responsibilization, is evident online.  It seems plausible that this pattern of behaviour is present in social media networks."

Research Fellow, Dr Claire Wardle from the Tow Center for Digital Journalism at the Columbia Journalism School, said: "It's tempting for judgments to be made about online conversations, which are based on little more than personal perception, hunches or well-publicised incidents of abuse. This research, based on a rigorous methodology, provides real insight into the conversations and content shared daily on social networks.

"I look forward to the same methodology being applied to other events so we can understand whether these results were a one-off caused by such a shocking incident, or in fact represent a pattern of behaviour around comments on social networks. It would be wonderful to know that, while hate speech and abuse does remain a problem, that actually the vast majority of people use social networks to support one another and their communities." 

The terrorist attack on Lee Rigby was the first in the UK to foster a significant social media reaction. In less than 20 minutes of the incident being reported to the police, eye-witnesses were using Twitter to spread information about the event as it unfolded.  Disturbing images and video clips emerged online shortly after.  These snippets of information were rapidly diffused through the social media eco-system by the act of 'retweeting'.  The COSMOS team also examined whether the speed at which tweets were re-tweeted affected the eventual number of retweets, and if Twitter users with more followers gained more influence in the spread of messages.

Researchers now plan to apply the same statistical model to several more events, including the Boston bombings, the coming out of Olympian Tom Daley on YouTube, the Paralympic opening ceremony, and the online harassment of Caroline Criado-Perez. 

The research is being conducted as part of the COSMOS Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) Google Data Analytics grant: 'Hate' Speech and Social Media: Understanding Users, Networks and Information Flows'. Collaborators include academics from the Universities of Warwick and St Andrews.

Study finds Twitter love for Lee Rigby stronger than hate for his killers

On the anniversary of the murder of Lee Rigby, researchers at Cardiff University have published results of their analysis into social media activity in the immediate aftermath of the event and found that messages loaded with racial tension and hate were far less likely to spread than those infused with love.

Carried out by academics at Cardiff University's Collaborative Online Social Media Observatory (COSMOS), this is the first analysis of its kind that examines the social media reaction following a terrorist attack. The team collected around half a million tweets to statistically model how the public reacted.

This terrorist attack was the first in the UK to foster a significant social media reaction. In less than 20 minutes of the incident being reported to the police, eye-witnesses were using Twitter to spread information about the event as it unfolded.  Disturbing images and video clips emerged online shortly after. These snippets of information were rapidly diffused through the social media eco-system by the act of 'retweeting'. 

The researchers were particularity interested in identifying the tweets that were most likely to spread following this event. They focussed on the emotive content of messages such as negative and positive sentiment, and racial tension, as well as content linking features within messages, such as hashtags and URLs. 

They also examined whether the speed at which tweets were re-tweeted affected the eventual number of retweets and if Twitter users with more followers gained more influence in the spread of messages. 

The results were surprising and did not support the common conception that social media platforms are havens for those spreading hateful and social disruptive online content.  To the contrary, the COSMOS team found that messages containing positive sentiment, such as tweets of good-wishes to the family of Lee Rigby, were statistically more likely to be frequently retweeted and form large and long lasting information flows.  They also found that tweets that included high levels of racial tension, such as those spreading hateful content towards those of Muslim faith, were statistically less likely to be retweeted. 

Dr Pete Burnap, School of Computer Science and Informatics, commented:

"Social media has often been associated with the spread of malicious and antagonistic content that could pose a potential risk to community relations.  We frequently hear about trolling and social media being used to harass members of the public or certain groups in society. However, this research provides some evidence that suggests it is actually the more positive and supportive messages that spread to a significant extent following events of this nature."

These findings are the first to indicate that social media platforms, in particular Twitter, may self-regulate, stemming the flow of negative and hateful information following terrorist and similar events of national interest.  The next phase of the research for the COSMOS team is to investigate if and how social media users engage in counter speech, to stem the spread of negativity online. 

Dr Matthew Williams, School of Social Sciences, said:

"Social scientists at Cardiff University have been conducting research into how people behave online for more than three decades.  Some of this work on virtual communities has shown how self-regulation, or what criminologists have called responsibilization, is evident online.  It seems plausible that this pattern of behaviour is present in social media networks."

The COSMOS team now plan to apply the same statistical model to several more events, including the Boston bombings, the coming out of Olympian Tom Daley on YouTube, the Paralympic opening ceremony and the online harassment of Caroline Criado-Perez. 

The paper is entitled 'Tweeting the Terror: Modelling the Social Media Reaction to the Woolwich Terrorist Attack' and will be published in the international peer-reviewed journal Social Network Analysis and Mining in June 2014.

The work is being conducted as part of the COSMOS Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) Google Data Analytics grant 'Hate' Speech and Social Media: Understanding Users, Networks and Information Flows'.

In addition to Dr Pete Burnap and Dr Matthew Williams this project involves Professor William Housley, Dr Adam Edwards and Dr Luke Sloan from the School of Social Sciences; Professor Omer Rana from the School of Computer Science and Informatics; Professor Rob Procter from University of Warwick and Dr Alex Voss from University of St Andrews.

Find out more about COSMOS on Twitter @cosmos_project and at www.cosmosproject.net

In the Media

Since releasing this story, it has been picked up in local and international press:

Wales Online

Times of India

Zee News, India

Dr Richard Watermeyer from the School of Social Sciences has led three large scale UK-wide consultations with the public to evaluate their views on emerging IVF technologies, the benefits and risks of clinical trials and likely policy issues in science and technology research.

All three reports have been supported by Sciencewise-ERC; a national centre that offers co-funding and specialist advice and support to Government departments and agencies to develop and commission public dialogue activities in emerging areas of science and technology.

The first report was co-funded by the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority (HFEA) and Sciencewise to gather the public's views on the social and ethical impact of emerging IVF-based techniques to prevent the transmission of mitochondrial disease.

The public consultation process involved public workshops, open meetings, a public survey, focus groups and an open consultation questionnaire. The findings from the research will be used by the Secretary of State for Health to help decide whether Government should seek Parliamentary approval to make the techniques available to patients.  

'Mitochondria Replacement Consultation' - view the full report on the HFEA website

The second evaluation carried out by Dr Watermeyer along with Dr Andrew Bartlett (Cardiff School of Social Sciences) was co-funded by the Health Research Agency (HRA) and Sciencewise on Public and Patient Engagement (PPE).

This project aimed to explore expectations around the benefits and risks of clinical trials and research involving patients, the ethical issues that might arise, and to gain views on how the public should be engaged and influence the HRA in the future.

The results were presented by the HRA to the House of Commons Select Committee on Science and Technology inquiry on clinical trials and referred to by the Department of Health and the Academy of Medical Sciences in their own evidence to the Committee.

The dialogue results have also fed into the HRA development of guidance for researchers on Information for Patients at the End of a Study. More widely, having seen the results of the dialogue, the National Institute for Health Research is revising its plans for training materials for patients.

'Public and Patient Engagement Project' – view the full report on the Sciencewise website

The third evaluation report was commissioned by the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills (BIS) and Sciencewise as a horizon-scanning project designed to develop a list of policy issues likely to face the UK Government in the next five to ten years concerning scientific and technological developments.

Some of the priority issues identified as part of this evaluation were the rising cost of high quality health and medical care, reducing carbon emissions, meeting the UK's long-term skills requirements and the use of machines to carry out tasks.

'Public input to the Sciencewise horizon-scanning workshop project' - view the full report on the Sciencewise website

Dr Richard Watermeyer is a Research Fellow at Cardiff University's School of Social Sciences who is currently seconded as a Science Policy Research Analyst for the Office of the Chief Scientific Adviser for Wales.

Professor Mike Levi is this year's recipient of the Sellin-Glueck award in criminology, the highest award given by The American Society of Criminology to scholars from outside the USA. 

Now in its 40th year, the Thorsten Sellin & Sheldon and Eleanor Glueck Award aims to draw attention to criminological scholarship that considers problems of crime and justice outside the United States.

Professor Levi will be presented with the award, achieved for his 'truly remarkable contributions to international and comparative criminology' at the Society's international conference in San Francisco in November.

Mike Levi has been Professor of Criminology at Cardiff University's School of Social Sciences since 1991. He has been conducting international research on the control of fraud and organised crime, corruption and money laundering/ financing of terrorism since 1972 and has conducted a large range of studies on these for the private and public sectors, publishing widely on these subjects as well as editing major journals. 

His pioneering research has led to his election to the Academy of Social Sciences and a Fellowship of the Learned Society of Wales. In 2013, he received the Distinguished Scholar Award from the International Association for the Study of Organized Crime (IASOC).

He is actively involved in global public policy involving business and crime. Some of his current posts include President of the US National White-Collar Crime Research Consortium and Member of the Committee on the Illicit Tobacco Market, US National Academy of Sciences, World Economic Forum, UK Crime Statistics Advisory Committee (especially fraud and eCrime) and Home Office economics panels.  He has recently collaborated with the International Monetary Fund (IMF) on the process of country money laundering evaluation and is currently engaged in major research projects on insider and outsider eCrime threats.

Professor Levi said: "The award is a surprising but very pleasurable recognition by the international mainstream criminology community of a lifetime's attempt to develop research in hard-to-research transnational and domestic areas of criminality that are now acknowledged to be of great social significance. My hope is that this great honour will encourage others to work on these areas of research to improve the evidence base for policy, practice and theory."

Professor Paul Atkinson and Dr Sara Delamont have been elected to The Learned Society of Wales in the 2014 Election of new Fellows. 

Professor Paul Atkinson is Distinguished Research Professor of Sociology and an Academician of the Academy of Social Sciences. He and Sara Delamont are the founding editors of the Sage journal Qualitative Research. He is currently conducting fieldwork and writing about skills and expertise among potters, printers, glassblowers and others. In 2013 he delivered the National Centre for Research Methods (NCRM) annual lecture entitled 'Why do fieldwork?' reflecting on research from his career.

Dr Sara Delamont is a Reader in the School of Social Sciences. She was the first woman President of BERA and is an Academician of the Academy of Social Sciences. Her research has covered many different areas and disciplines including anthropology, feminist and gender studies, the sociology of education, food, professions and qualitative research methods. She is currently doing ground-breaking ethnographic research on Capoeira and Savate (French kickboxing). In 2013 she was awarded the British Sociological Association Distinguished Service Award for her contribution to British Sociology.

Sara and Paul join ten other School of Social Sciences staff who are existing Fellows of the Society, which was founded in 2010.

This recent election has added forty-three Fellows to the Society who represent a broad range of academic disciplines.  The 2014 Election is the fourth in a rolling process towards the building of a strong, representative Fellowship. 

Election to Fellowship of the Learned Society of Wales is via nomination by existing Fellows.  It is open to men and women of all ages and from all ethnic groups:

  • who have a demonstrable record of excellence and achievement in any of the academic disciplines or who, being members of the professions, the arts, industry, commerce or public service, have made a distinguished contribution to the world of learning; and
  • who are resident in Wales, or who are persons of Welsh birth but are resident elsewhere, or who otherwise have a particular connection with Wales.

Cardiff School of Social Sciences staff who are Fellows of the Society:

Professor Barbara Adam
Professor Huw Beynon
Professor Phil Brown
Professor Harry Collins
Professor Alan Felstead
Professor Ralph Fevre
Professor Ian Rees Jones
Professor Gareth Rees
Professor Teresa Rees
Professor Valerie Walkerdine

A group of senior Welsh academics have come together to call for the Welsh Government to bring forward legislation to remove the legal defence of 'reasonable punishment' for adults who physically assault children.

The group has named itself 'Academics for Equal Protection' because its members are calling for children to have the same protection as adults from physical assaults.

The academics - who all work or live in Wales - have expertise in children's social care, education, community paediatrics, family law and criminology and they represent some of the most senior members of those disciplines in Wales.

The group is non-party political and is not part of any existing campaign group.  Its members argue that the weight of international research evidence makes the case for a legislative change compelling.

Physical punishment (defined as causing pain to a child as a punishment but stopping short of injury) is associated with a range of negative outcomes, as established through decades of robust international studies.  Strong associations between experiencing physical punishment and the following outcomes have been established in repeated studies:

  • Increased aggression in children
  • Poorer mental health
  • Physical abuse (through escalation of punishment towards abuse)
  • Poorer child-adult relationships
  • In adulthood, anti-social behaviour and criminality, including the abuse of adult partners and children.

Even lower levels of corporal punishment have been found to have an impact on children's anti-social behaviour. The group believe that reducing physical punishment through a change in the law will eventually lead to better outcomes for individual children and for Welsh society as a whole.

The group believe that the legal defence of 'reasonable punishment' that is currently available for parents and some other carers under Section 58 of the Children Act 2004 leads to confusion for parents and the professionals advising them. There is a need to simplify the law and give children the same protection from assault as adults.

Thirty-six other nations have successfully banned all forms of physical punishment on children.  There is no evidence of a marked increase in criminalisation of parents in these nations. Instead legislation has helped to accelerate the decline in the use of physical punishment and an increase in more effective parenting styles. Legislative change has therefore acted as a public health measure.

The group would like to work with the Welsh Government to bring forward the necessary legal and public education changes as soon as possible.

Dr Sally Holland, from Cardiff University's School of Social Sciences and a founding member of Academics for Equal Protection, will be speaking on behalf of the group at the fringe meeting 'Children Deserve Equal Protection Under The Law' at the Welsh Labour Party Conference in Llandudno on 29th March at 12.30pm. 

Group Members

Dr Sally Holland, Professor Emma Renold, Dr Amanda Robinson, Professor Jonathan Scourfield,  Professor Chris Taylor, School of Social Sciences, Cardiff University.

Professor Gillian Douglas and Dr Julie Doughty, Cardiff Law School, Cardiff University.

Professor Alison Kemp, Dr Sabine Maguire, Early Years Research Team, Institute of Primary Care and Public Health, School of Medicine, Cardiff University.

Dr Elspeth Webb, Institute of Molecular and Experimental Medicine, School of Medicine, Cardiff University.

Professor Stephanie Van Goozen and Dr Katherine Shelton, School of Psychology, Cardiff University.

Professor Judy Hutchings, Centre for Evidence Based Early Intervention, Bangor University.

Professor Fiona Brookman and Dr Jonathan Evans, Centre for Criminology, University of South Wales.

Alison Perry, Associate Professor, Jane Williams, Associate Professor and Dr Simon Hoffman, College of Law, Swansea University and Wales Observatory on Human Rights of Children and Young People.

Professor Kevin Haines, Director, Centre for Criminal Justice and Criminology, Swansea University.

Professor Ian Butler, Professor of Social Work, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, University of Bath.

Professor June Statham, Professor Emerita, Institute of Education, University of London.

Professor Nigel Thomas, Professor of Childhood and Youth Research, School of Social Work, University of Central Lancashire.