Ewch i’r prif gynnwys

Newyddion

Lynne

We supported Community Gateway and Grangetown partners in running the third annual ‘Love Grangetown’ planning and celebration event.

We met to celebrate what’s been achieved through working together, and to plan ahead.

BSc1 and BSc2 Architecture students participated by putting together exhibit and marketing materials, facilitating workshops and analysing the results, creating workshop activities for kids and adults, and baking a lot of cakes.

This WSA student-made film captures a fantastic day in Grangetown.

Watch the WSA student-made film.

Community Gateway

Find out more about our university-community partnership opportunities in Grangetown.

The team behind Community Gateway, one of the University's five flagship engagement projects will host a stall at tomorrow's Grangetown Festival Day. The team will meet residents and share information about the project, which aims to forge connections between the University and Grangetown.

As part of the event, which is designed to bring the local community together, there will also be a display of the results of the Grange Gardens initiative, a recent collaboration between students from the School of Architecture and Grangetown residents.

The Community Gateway project is one of the five flagship engagement projects identified in the University's The Way Forward document. The project aims to pilot an approach to supporting and facilitating health, environmental and socio-economic development initiatives and interventions through community projects linked to existing research and teaching at Cardiff University.

This event follows on from the School of Architecture's successful Grange Gardens 'vertical studio' project, which saw them working with local people to plan how best to transform the disused Grange Gardens Bowling Pavilion into a vibrant community hub. The 'vertical studio' gives undergraduates the opportunity to work on an intensive 3 week project and takes them outside of the typical design studio experience.

Over 400 local residents took part in the Grange Gardens 'vertical studio' initiative. The project invited stakeholders from across the community to work with Cardiff University students to develop plans to transform the empty building into a lively community space which fulfils the needs of local people.

grangetown community gateway 1

The team behind the 'vertical studio' also worked closely with over 50 schoolchildren to explore their ideas on what facilities they would like to see in their area. The school workshops were also an opportunity for the children to find out more about both Cardiff University and architecture as a discipline.

The Grange Gardens initiative is part of the Community Gateway project - one of the five flagship engagement projects identified in the University'sThe Way Forward document. The Community Gateway project aims to pilot an approach to supporting and facilitating health, environmental and socio-economic development initiatives and interventions through community projects linked to existing research and teaching at Cardiff University.

The Grangetown Festival is taking place in Grange Gardens, 1pm – 4pm.

Prof Chris Tweed

Forty years since first arriving at the University's Welsh School of Architecture as an undergraduate from Northern Ireland, Christopher Tweed now takes the helm as its head. As Head of School, Professor Christopher Tweed will oversee all of the School's research and teaching activities.

"The Welsh School of Architecture has always produced excellent graduates who go on to be employed by prestigious practices the world over, largely because they are taught how to make their innovative designs a reality – and I intend to build on this legacy," said Professor Tweed.

"Architecture is a changing profession, having to respond to emerging problems, such as doubts over energy supply, climate change, protecting our built heritage and designing future cities. Our graduates have the design creativity, historical and cultural understanding, social awareness and technical expertise needed to address these issues," he added.

Having in 1974 embarked on an undergraduate degree in Architecture at Cardiff, Professor Tweed stayed on at the School to study for a doctorate in energy in buildings.

After graduating he took a number of leading positions which included a post in the University of Edinburgh and later a role as Head of the Department of Architecture at Belfast's Queen's University. He also spent time as a visiting professor in the College of Fine Arts at Carnegie Mellon University in Pennsylvania before returning to Cardiff in 2007 as Director of the Building Research Establishment (BRE).

He continued: "Many architects today risk painting themselves into a corner by privileging highly conceptual design, which is often rarefied and detached from the needs of ordinary people. Architecture needs to maintain the connection between design and people for it to remain relevant."

"At Cardiff, I want to cultivate multi-skilled students who employ an imagination infused with psychology, science, theory and art when developing and delivering a building. I want our students to embrace the grittiness of design; to have the technical prowess of knowing how to build a design."

The School's research strengths lie in three key areas: architectural science, which includes low carbon futures, sustainable design and interactions between people and the built environment; architectural history and theory, which explores the relations between architecture and its cultural context; and the integrative power of design research, bringing together the results and insights from a variety of architectural disciplines to produce award-winning buildings through the School's Design Research Unit Wales (DRUw).

Professor Tweed will bring to his new role a renewed focus in teaching students to design with a view to enhancing lives. He spelled out his vision for the School: "We live in an increasingly complex world full of wicked problems. My vision is to create an environment where we can produce students and research that will contribute to alleviating these problems. It starts with an enduring commitment to creative pragmatism and the belief that inquiry, designing and making are part of a continuum in which it makes no sense to separate means from ends. To this end we have set a new agenda around three themes - models, meanings and making – to focus the debate about the continuously evolving practice of architecture.

"I have a passion for creating an environment that enables people to do their best work, whether it is students, teachers, researchers or support staff. That, coupled with a fervent belief that the best architecture comes from imagination informed by rigorous inquiry, and is directed towards improving the quality of life for all, are what I hope to bring to my new role."

"I feel very privileged to be able to lead this wonderful school and to give something back to the institution that set the course for my entire working life."

Cardiff University's Welsh School of Architecture has a reputation of being one of the best schools in the UK. Its holistic approach to design embraces all aspects of architecture. The learning experience is focused around the studio project, based on the traditional one-to-one approach to design teaching. The studio culture is strong with high quality working space, workshops and computer aided design facilities. Academic staff are supported by visiting professors and tutors from local and leading UK practices, providing an exciting and informative mix of design approaches and experiences.

Two animated characters have been recruited to highlight new training opportunities to help put Wales at the forefront of sustainability expertise in the built environment sector.     

Fictional Welsh architect, Sophie and her self-employed builder friend, Bryn are the latest recruits to spread the message about new training opportunities for businesses working in the built environment sector in some of Wales' most deprived communities.   

The short animated films are the brainchild of Built Environment Sustainability Training (BEST) – an EU supported programme led by academics at the University's Welsh School of Architecture in partnership with, Asset Skills, CITB Construction Skills, Constructing Excellence in Wales, the Energy Saving Trust, Proskills and Summit Skills.

Working alongside the award winning animation studio Radish Pictures the animated characters tell the story of two of the professionals who can benefit from BEST training opportunities.

"Whether you're an energy assessor, planner, surveyor or architect and builder like Sophie and Bryn living in Wales' convergence areas – you could be entitled to receive the latest training to develop knowledge and skills in sustainability practices," according to BEST Programme Director, Dr Julie Gwilliam from the Welsh School of Architecture.  

"Whether you are a firm who employs 100 people or one, BEST provide flexible training to help businesses grow, develop new skills and improve their impact on society, the environment, and the economy.

"The videos are great fun, and explain in simple terms what we are offering and what the benefits are – to individuals, businesses and to Wales as a whole. Radish Pictures has done a fantastic job – the videos are creating a lot of interest and helping to get our message out in a way that grabs people's attention," she added. 

All three videos can be viewed on the BEST website and on BEST's Youtube channel.

BEST is coordinating a major programme of flexible, subsidised training to develop knowledge and skills in the latest sustainability practices - particularly in construction, energy, waste, and water.

Supported by the European Social Fund, through the Welsh Government, BEST training courses will be offered to people who live or work in one of Wales' Convergence areas, from early 2014 until July 2015.

BEST is bringing together outstanding training providers to deliver training which will benefit businesses, employees, the environment and the economy of Wales, with training for people such as energy assessors and advisors, architects, planners, engineers, maintenance teams, surveyors, site supervisors and other related roles.

BEST is supported by the European Social Fund, through the Welsh Government to deliver training until July 2015.

Cardiff urban design students have presented their ideas for the regeneration of Swansea High Street in a new exhibition in the city centre (29 June – 11 July).

As part of the MA in Urban Design, run jointly by Cardiff's School of Planning and Geography and Welsh School of Architecture, students undertook a project focused on redeveloping the once popular shopping area of Swansea.

The students consulted with the members of the local community including local businesses, residents and the local authority to respond to and interpret their aspirations for the regeneration of High Street.

The student designs include proposals for spaces around the historic Palace Theatre, the railway station and High Street from the station to Castle Square. Ideas include creating 'Green Island' pocket parks, developing an 'innovation hub' for students and alumni, strategies to encourage high-activity functions in the spaces behind the shops to increase vitality on High Street, and inhabiting the roofs of Parc Tawe.

The exhibition is accompanied by an events programme which represents a hand over of the students' ideas and strategies to local stakeholders, enabling dialogue amongst interested parties to continue and to contribute to regeneration capacity building in the area.

The project was led by Andrea Frank, School of Planning and Geography, Louie Sieh and Marga Munar Bauza, both of the Welsh School of Architecture. Speaking about the project, Louie Sieh said: "We welcome the opportunity to work with the people of Swansea High Street. The students have learnt a lot over the course of the project, so we hope that this exhibition will be a way of giving a little something back to the city."

The exhibition Re-thinking the High Street was launched on 28th June giving those involved in the project a preview of the designs. It is open to the public from 29th June – 11th July at 214, High Street, Swansea, SA1 1PE. Entry is free and it is open daily (except Sunday) from 1pm-6pm.

The MA project was supported by Swansea City Council and Coastal Housing.

A project to explore solar energy technologies and their role in a low carbon future will be launched by the Welsh School of Architecture in partnership with Tata Steel.

As part of EU Sustainable Energy Week, the Sustainable Building Envelope Demonstration (SBED) project will design, model, test, prototype and monitor low carbon building systems incorporating transpired solar collectors (TSC) in eight buildings in Convergence Areas of Wales. Building types include residential, commercial (offices or retail), industrial and institutional (schools, hospitals, care homes).

The project will closely monitor the construction, implementation and real-life performance of the demonstration systems, disseminating best practice to the wider industry. Information gathered during the project will enable the economic viability and cost effectiveness of the technologies to be assessed for the different building types.

The project is backed with £1.8m from the European Regional Development Fund through the Welsh Government.

Phil Jones, Sustainable Building Envelope Demonstration, project director, Cardiff University, said:"The potential for using the envelope of the building to collect solar energy is huge. SBED will develop and demonstrate an integrated approach to building scale renewable energy generation, rather than have it as a bolt-on.

"This project aims to kick start the industry for the provision, installation and maintenance of these systems by showing, through working examples, how the technologies can be integrated into various building types in Wales."

The launch event will take place on Thursday 27th June, 2013, at the SPECIFIC Innovation Centre, Baglan Bay. This will provide an opportunity to explore in more detail, building integrated solar energy technologies and their role in a low carbon future.

There are limited spaces available, and places must be registered here.

Built Environment Sustainability Training (BEST) aims to put Wales at the forefront of sustainability expertise by offering flexible, subsidised training to develop knowledge and skills in the latest sustainability practices - particularly in construction, energy, waste, and water.

Courses will be offered to people who live or work in one of Wales' Convergence areas, from autumn 2013.

The programme's North Wales launch will take place at Venue Cymru in Llandudno on Thursday May 23rd at 5pm and will include information for employers, individuals and potential training providers.

"We will pull together the very best training providers to deliver training which will benefit businesses, employees, the environment and the economy of Wales," said programme director, Dr Julie Gwilliam, of the Welsh School of Architecture at Cardiff University.

"Training will be for people such as energy assessors and advisors, architects, planners, engineers, maintenance teams, surveyors, site supervisors and many other related roles. We're especially keen to involve women and people aged over 50 working across different areas of the built environment."

It is supported by the European Social Fund, through the Welsh Government to deliver training until July 2015.

"Although the BEST programme will end in 2015, we are determined to leave a valuable legacy," added Dr Gwilliam. "We will work with key stakeholders with responsibilities for the skills of the energy, waste, water and built environment sectors to create a 10-year strategy and training delivery roadmap. This will better equip businesses, employees and training providers in Wales through the courses which we will be coordinating."

A few places may still be available for the event – attendance is free. Visit the website or or phone 029 2087 0990 for information.

A major new training programme led by the University's Welsh School of Architecture will allow professionals in the built environment sector to learn knowledge and skills to take them to the very forefront of sustainability expertise.

Built Environment Sustainability Training (BEST) will offer flexible, subsidised training to develop knowledge and skills in the latest sustainability practices - particularly in construction, energy, waste, and water.

Courses will be offered to people who live or work in one of Wales' Convergence areas, from autumn 2013.

The EU backed programme Built Environment Sustainability Training will be officially launched by Deputy Minister for Skills and Technology, Jeff Cuthbert, at the Senedd in Cardiff Bay on May 1st.

Programme director Dr Julie Gwilliam, Welsh School of Architecture said: "We will pull together the very best training providers to deliver training which will benefit businesses, employees, the environment and the economy of Wales.

"Training will be for people such as energy assessors and advisors, architects, planners, engineers, maintenance teams, surveyors, site supervisors and many other related roles. We're especially keen to involve women and people aged over 50 working across different areas of the built environment."

The programme is led in partnership with Asset Skills and is supported by the European Social Fund through the Welsh Government to deliver training until July 2015.

Information about the training can be found on the BEST website or by calling 02920 870 990.

Celebrating Welsh design

Cydnabuwyd Canolfan Ymchwil yn yr Amgylchedd Adeiledig, Caerdydd gan wobr genedlaethol sy'n dathlu'r gorau mewn dylunio yng Nghymru.

Rhoddodd beirniaid Gwobr Dewi Prys-Thomas gymeradwyaeth i'r Ganolfan (CRiBE) am ei gwaith ymchwil arloesol a'i henw da rhyngwladol ym maes dylunio amgylcheddol, effeithlonrwydd ynni mewn adeiladau a datblygiad cynaliadwy trefol.

Mae'r Ganolfan, sydd wedi ei lleoli yn Ysgol Bensaernïaeth Cymru, yn cael ei harwain gan yr Athro Phil Jones ac yn arddel ymagwedd ryngddisgyblaethol gyfannol at ddylunio. Mae wedi cynhyrchu modelau rhagfynegiad amgylcheddol ar gyfer dinasoedd ac adeiladau unigol fel ei gilydd a modelau strategaeth ar gyfer ailgylchu a gwastraff.

Mae Gwobr Dewi Prys-Thomas yn wobr fawreddog Gymreig sy'n cydnabod pwysigrwydd dylunio da i ansawdd bywyd, hunaniaeth ac adfywiad Cymru. Cafodd ei henwi ar ôl yr athro a'r pensaer Dewi Prys-Thomas, a oedd yn adnabyddus fel eiriolwr dros Gymru a'i hamgylchedd.

Hundreds of images of University life were projected onto the University's Main Building using multiple lighting techniques and cutting-edge technology.

The Open Air Gallery, held as part of the Student High Street launch, was inspired by the Welsh School of Architecture who ran a similar event with students as part of a teaching module in May 2012.

School Research Associate, Nick Humes, said: "The module allowed students to explore themes and techniques which are often outside that of 'typical' design projects. Innovative methods and tools were used in a way which explored architecture outside the studio and resulted in outputs which engaged the public through an exciting and novel medium.

"The possibilities with this technology are endless and I feel very proud that our students have been the first to work with Philips on such a project and to have been at the forefront of this development."

Click here to view a selection of images from the event.