Ewch i’r prif gynnwys

Child and adolescent psychiatry

Mae'r cynnwys hwn ar gael yn Saesneg yn unig.

child psych team
The Child and Adolescent Psychiatry team

Our research mission is to generate findings that will improve children and young people’s mental health.

Our research

Our research in child and adolescent psychiatry covers four key areas:

Our depression and anxiety research aims to:

  • examine the causes of depression in young people, assess how depression develops and identify prevention targets
  • develop early detection, intervention and psych-education programmes in collaboration with young people and practitioners.
  • Recent discoveries and outputs

    Our research in this area explores development, causes and links with anxiety and depression. We aim to:

    • examine the natural history, causes and outcomes of ADHD, autism and communication problems from early childhood to adult life
    • identify ADHD causes and investigate why there are sex differences using genomics and epidemiological designs
    • investigate severe irritability and why those with ADHD and ASD are at elevated risk for anxiety and depression.

    Recent discoveries and outputs

    Our research aims to:

    • investigate mental health in young people and their life at school. We collaborate with colleagues in the School of Psychology, DECIPHer and Swansea University
    • develop new methods of including validated mental health assessments, longitudinal data linkage and secure linkage to electronic health records in school-based research, and testing the feasibility of collecting genetic samples in a classroom setting. We are actively working in this area through the Mental Wellbeing in Adolescence: Genes and Environment Study (MAGES)
    • identify ways of promoting good mental health during the transition from primary to secondary school and the importance of children’s age within their school year for mental health.

    Current projects

    Mae'r cynnwys hwn ar gael yn Saesneg yn unig.

    This study, also known as the Early Prediction of Adolescent Depression (EPAD) study, aims to improve understanding of the causes of young people’s mental health.

    We also aim to develop evidence-based methods of early intervention and support for people experiencing mental health challenges – with a particular focus on difficulties with low mood and depression.

    Background

    In General Practice, tools that predict physical health problems are used routinely. We plan to use the results of this study to develop similar tools not currently available for mental health. These sorts of tools will help to ensure that people most in need receive the support and care they need.

    The study includes 337 families from across the UK where an individual has been affected by low mood. It is currently the largest study of its type in the world. Since it started in 2007, families have taken part in interviews and a range of other assessments three times when the young people were teenagers.

    The study is unique because it has followed families throughout their lives and listened to and documented the ups and downs for over ten years. This type of study enables a thorough understanding of the causes and consequences of low mood and resilience to depression. As well as contributing to the expertise and knowledge of depression nationally and internationally, our research ultimately aims to help those individuals affected by mental health and their families.

    The Medical Research Council has funded a fourth phase of research (2017-2020) enabling us to revisit all families and follow the young people into their adult life.

    “Taking part in this research took away the shame I was experiencing from living with chronic low mood. This study was the forerunner in taking mental health seriously, investigating its life span and its impact on families. As the rest of society gets on board with promoting wellbeing and wellness, I am proud to have been here at the start.”

    Parent

    Our findings so far

    Thanks to the families taking part in our study over the last ten years, we are beginning to understand the causes of mental health difficulties as well as positive mental health. We have made many important scientific discoveries and published over 50 reports in scientific journals to date, as well as over 100 papers about depression. You can find these papers on the profiles of our researchers.

    A snapshot of some of our most important scientific findings includes identifying factors that promote mental health resilience in young people as well as those that predict the onset of mood problems. Another finding suggests different types of adolescent depression. On a more practical level, several families in our study have contributed to the development of an online package to help young people and their families manage low mood.

    The development of this package has been led by Dr Rhys Bevan Jones at Cardiff University. The package is currently being tested in a randomised controlled trial of young people experiencing low mood in a project funded by the National Institute for Health Research.

    Take part in our research

    Understanding the causes of low mood and depression, and identifying who might be more likely to develop difficulties before problems arise, helps us create better ways to support people and prevent early problems from escalating into something more serious. Taking part in our study is an incredible way to help achieve this and without your help research like this wouldn’t be possible.

    "This study is researching a really important topic, one close to my heart. Hopefully I am able to play a small part in helping other people. The researchers are friendly and flexible, offering to meet me in my house if needed and the meetings are normally no longer than two hours so it's really not much time to set aside during the day. I'd definitely advise anyone thinking about taking part to do it."

    Young person

    Families are usually contacted by the University to organise participation. However if you have taken part in the study previously and would like to arrange taking part in this current phase, please get in touch.

    Get in touch

    Further information

    Parent information sheet.docx

    12 March 2019

    This information sheet will help you decide whether you would like to take part in our study again.

    Word

    Young person information sheet.docx

    12 March 2019

    This information sheet will help you decide whether you would like to take part in our study again.

    Word

    Our team

    Our team is based at the MRC Centre for Neuropsychiatric Genetics and Genomics, a centre of excellence for mental health research.

    Academic leads

    Frances Rice

    Yr Athro Frances Rice

    Senior Lecturer, Division of Psychological Medicine and Clinical Neurosciences

    Email:
    ricef2@caerdydd.ac.uk
    Telephone:
    +44 (0)29 2068 8384
    Stephan Collishaw

    Yr Athro Stephan Collishaw

    Senior Lecturer, Division of Psychological Medicine and Clinical Neurosciences

    Email:
    collishaws@caerdydd.ac.uk
    Telephone:
    +44 (0)29 2068 8436
    Ajay Thapar

    Dr Ajay Thapar

    Psychiatrist, Division of Psychological Medicine and Clinical Neurosciences

    Email:
    thaparak@caerdydd.ac.uk
    Telephone:
    +44 (0)29 2068 8490
    Anita Thapar

    Yr Athro Anita Thapar

    Clinical Professor, Division of Psychological Medicine and Clinical Neurosciences

    Email:
    thapar@caerdydd.ac.uk
    Telephone:
    +44 (0)29 2068 8478
    Valentina Escott-Price

    Yr Athro Valentina Escott-Price

    Reader, Division of Psychological Medicine and Clinical Neurosciences

    Email:
    escottpricev@caerdydd.ac.uk
    Telephone:
    +44 (0)29 2068 8429

    Collaborators and advisors

    We are working closely with Dr Jon Heron (Bristol University), who is providing expert advice on longitudinal trajectory analysis, and Professor David Osborn (UCL) who will provide expert analysis in individual risk prediction analysis as the study progresses.

    Dr Robert Potter, Dr Amani Hassan, Dr Rhys Bevan-Jones and Dr Judith Allardyce are clinical advisors on the study.

    Research team

    Alice Stephens, Bryony Weavers and Jessica Lennon are at the core of our research team, visiting and interviewing families to speak to them and track the changes in their lives over the past few years.

    Emma Meilak looks after the administration of our project and is the key point of contact for all our families participating in the study.

    Useful resources

    National Centre for Mental Health - the NCMH website has a dedicated depression section, including details on research, suggested reading and links to medication information.

    Mind - information and support along with downloadable leaflets and real people's stories. Search 'depression' from the homepage.

    Samaritans - available 24 hours a day to provide confidential emotional support for people experiencing feelings of distress, despair or suicidal thoughts.

    Mae'r cynnwys hwn ar gael yn Saesneg yn unig.

    Neurodevelopmental disorders such as Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) and Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) affect at least 1 in 10 children.

    They are thought to begin in early life and, until recently, most children were thought to grow out of their problems. However, we now know that adults are also affected but not much is known about what these problems look like in adults. To start, we need to know what is “normal” or typical.

    Research approach

    For the first time, neurodevelopmental problems will be assessed in a group of around 8,000 adults (26 year olds) who have taken part in repeated assessments since they were in the womb. We will also assess anxiety, depression and irritability using the same measures that were used in childhood and adolescence.

    We will describe neurodevelopmental problems at age 26, as well as patterns of comorbidity with anxiety, depression and other mental health problems. We will find out how neurodevelopmental problems are linked to child/adolescent neurodevelopmental profiles and work with population cohorts in other countries to ensure our findings are robust.

    We will also test the extent to which early life experiences (in the womb and the early years) make a difference to life-long (at least up to age 26) neurodevelopmental health using a variety of methods to test causal inference, including Mendelian Randomization.

    We will also examine the contribution of genes. Working across different populations will internationally strengthen this type of research. This work has been funded as a Wellcome Trust Collaborative Award.

    Proposed outcome

    First, we will characterise the natural history of neurodevelopmental disorders from childhood to adult life (aged 4 to 26 years) in a UK population cohort where people have been assessed multiple times at different ages.

    We will then investigate the longer-term impacts of early life exposures and risks including links with depression.

    Finally, we will apply novel epidemiological methods to infer which early life exposures have causal impacts.

    Research team

    Lucy Riglin

    Dr Lucy Riglin

    Research Associate, Division of Psychological Medicine and Clinical Neurosciences

    Email:
    riglinl@caerdydd.ac.uk
    Telephone:
    +44 (0)29 2068 8419
    Anita Thapar

    Yr Athro Anita Thapar

    Clinical Professor, Division of Psychological Medicine and Clinical Neurosciences

    Email:
    thapar@caerdydd.ac.uk
    Telephone:
    +44 (0)29 2068 8478

    We are collaborating on this project with researchers at University of Bristol, including:

    Co-investigators

    • Professor George Davey Smith
    • Dr Evie Stergiakouli
    • Professor Kate Tilling

    Postdoctoral researchers

    • Dr Beate Leppert

    Mae'r cynnwys hwn ar gael yn Saesneg yn unig.

    Children with neurodevelopmental disorders such as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are at increased risk of developing additional mental health problems in early adulthood and using health services more.

    The reasons for this are unknown, with little research on this topic. One major barrier to research in this area is that tracking children with neurodevelopmental disorders into early adulthood is very difficult as they are often poor attenders of outpatient services.

    Studies following individuals by looking at patient data from routinely collected GP records offer an attractive solution.

    Research approach

    The Wales-based Secure Anonymous Information Linkage (SAIL) databank anonymously collates routinely collected data from the NHS, Government and schools for almost everyone in Wales.

    Using this anonymised data, we have identified all cases of ADHD and ASD in Wales. We can now electronically track outcomes using routine data from this population dataset to identify predictors of poor outcomes.

    We also previously collected a sample of children with ADHD as part of the Study of ADHD Genes and Environment (SAGE study). We have invited these individuals into the data-linkage study and can electronically track their outcomes. Because we already have so much information about them, they’re an ideal group to see what predicts later outcomes and inform analyses in the larger population dataset.

    Having created these unique datasets, we can expand our investigation into the early predictors of poor outcome for those diagnosed with Neurodevelopmental Disorders.

    This project is funded by the ISSF3 Population Research Wellcome Trust award.

    Lead investigator

    Dr Kate Langley

    Dr Kate Langley

    Senior Lecturer

    Email:
    langleyk@caerdydd.ac.uk
    Telephone:
    +44 (0)29 2087 6259

    Co-investigators (Cardiff University)

    Anita Thapar

    Yr Athro Anita Thapar

    Clinical Professor, Division of Psychological Medicine and Clinical Neurosciences

    Email:
    thapar@caerdydd.ac.uk
    Telephone:
    +44 (0)29 2068 8478
    Shantini Paranjothy

    Yr Athro Shantini Paranjothy

    Clinical Senior Lecturer

    Email:
    paranjothys@caerdydd.ac.uk
    Telephone:
    +44 (0)29 2068 7245

    Co-investigators (Swansea University)

    • Professor Ann John

    Mae'r cynnwys hwn ar gael yn Saesneg yn unig.

    Nod yr Astudiaeth Lles Meddyliol mewn Llencyndod: Genynnau a’r Amgylchedd (MAGES) yw gwella dealltwriaeth o sut y gall genynnau a’r amgylchedd effeithio ar les meddyliol pobl ifanc.

    I wneud hyn, mae angen samplau DNA arnom gan filoedd o bobl ifanc. Byddwn yn ymweld ag ysgolion yng Nghymru i roi’r cyfle i ddisgyblion blwyddyn 7 ac 8 gymryd rhan yn ein hymchwil drwy roi sampl o boer.

    Amcangyfrifir bod 1 o bob 5 person ifanc yn dioddef o broblemau fel iselder neu orbryder. Gall problemau iechyd meddwl effeithio ar addysg, perthnasoedd a lles pobl ifanc.
    Bydd y tîm MAGES yn ymweld â’ch ysgol i gyflwyno gweithdy gwyddoniaeth. Gyda’ch caniatâd, byddwn yn cymryd sampl poer gan eich plentyn.

    Mae tîm yr Astudiaeth Lles Meddyliol mewn Llencyndod: Genynnau a’r Amgylchedd (MAGES) yn rhan o Ganolfan y Cyngor Ymchwil Feddygol ar gyfer Geneteg Niwroseiciatrig a Genomeg ym Mhrifysgol Caerdydd.

    Stephan - Arweinydd y Prosiect

    Stephan Collishaw

    Yr Athro Stephan Collishaw

    Senior Lecturer, Division of Psychological Medicine and Clinical Neurosciences

    Email:
    collishaws@caerdydd.ac.uk
    Telephone:
    +44 (0)29 2068 8436

    Rwy’n frwd dros iechyd meddwl plant, ac mae gen i fwy nag 20 mlynedd o brofiad ymchwil yn y maes hwn. Mae gen i ddiddordeb arbennig mewn sut i hyrwyddo cadernid iechyd meddwl, y cysylltiadau rhwng iechyd meddwl plant ac oedolion, ac a yw iechyd meddwl pobl ifanc yn gwella neu’n gwaethygu.

    Mae’r astudiaeth hon yn bwysig i lywio ein dealltwriaeth o sut mae genynnau a’r amgylchedd yn rhyngweithio i siapio iechyd a lles meddyliol pobl ifanc.

    Fran - Uwch Ymchwilydd

    Frances Rice

    Yr Athro Frances Rice

    Senior Lecturer, Division of Psychological Medicine and Clinical Neurosciences

    Email:
    ricef2@caerdydd.ac.uk
    Telephone:
    +44 (0)29 2068 8384

    Fy mhrif ddiddordeb ymchwil yw nodi’r hyn sy’n achosi iselder mewn llencyndod a pham ei fod yn digwydd dro ar ôl tro. Rwy’n astudio datblygiad gydol oes ac mae gen i ddiddordeb mewn nodi risgiau achosol a ffactorau amddiffynnol y gellir eu targedu fel rhan o ymyriadau seicolegol ac iechyd y cyhoedd.

    Naomi - Cynorthwy-ydd Ymchwil

    Naomi Warne

    Naomi Warne

    Research Assistant, Division of Psychological Medicine and Clinical Neurosciences

    Email:
    warnen@caerdydd.ac.uk
    Telephone:
    +44 (0)29 2068 8473

    Mae fy rôl yn cynnwys ymweld ag ysgolion i gyflwyno gweithdai gwyddoniaeth hwyl a chasglu samplau poer (DNA) gan ddisgyblion sy’n cymryd rhan yn ein hymchwil.

    Mae gen i ddiddordeb mewn ffeindio’r ffactorau sy’n helpu pobl ifanc i gael lles meddyliol da. Mae gen i gefndir mewn ymchwil iechyd meddwl a gweithio gyda phobl ifanc. Ar gyfer fy PhD defnyddiais ddulliau gwahanol i edrych ar y cysylltiad rhwng y cof a hwyliau mewn pobl ifanc. Dwi hefyd wedi bod yn rhan o nifer o brosiectau ymchwil mewn ysgolion a redir gan DECIPHer.

    Yn fy amser sbâr, dwi’n mwynhau treulio amser gyda fy nghath, chwarae badminton a gwneud gwaith celf.

    Sarah - Cynorthwy-ydd Ymchwil

    Sarah Rook

    Sarah Rook

    Research Assistant, Division of Psychological Medicine and Clinical Neurosciences

    Email:
    rooks@caerdydd.ac.uk
    Telephone:
    +44 (0)29 2068 8392

    Dwi’n ymweld ag ysgolion i helpu i redeg gweithdai gwyddoniaeth a chasglu DNA (poer!) gan bobl ifanc sy’n cymryd rhan yn ein hastudiaeth.

    Mae gen i ddiddordeb mewn helpu pobl i wella eu lles meddyliol. Yn flaenorol dwi wedi gweithio ar brosiect ymchwil mawr yn edrych ar y defnydd o Therapi Gwybyddol Ymddygiadol (ThGY) gyda phobl ifanc mewn ysgolion. Dwi hefyd wedi gweithio mewn rôl glinigol gyda phobl ifanc mewn gwasanaeth poen cronig.

    Pan dwi ddim yn y gwaith dwi’n mwynhau mynd am dro hir gyda fy nghi, treulio amser gyda fy nheulu a theithio.

    Lesley - Rheolwr Labordy

    Lesley Bates

    Lesley Bates

    Research Technician, Division of Psychological Medicine and Clinical Neurosciences

    Email:
    batesl2@caerdydd.ac.uk
    Telephone:
    +44 (0)29 2068 8365

    Dwi’n cydlynu tîm o wyddonwyr a fydd yn cynnal y gwaith labordy, gan gynnwys echdynnu’r DNA o’r samplau poer a rhedeg y peiriannau sy’n dadansoddi’r DNA.

    Fel rheolwr labordy, dwi’n gweithio gyda nifer o dimau ymchwil gwahanol yng Nghanolfan y Cyngor Ymchwil Feddygol ar gyfer Geneteg Niwroseiciatrig a Genomeg i gefnogi eu hymchwil. Dwi hefyd yn gyfrifol am redeg y labordy o ddydd i ddydd.

    Yn fy amser sbâr dwi’n mwynhau mynd i’r theatr, nofio ac ymweld â ffrindiau a theulu.

    Lucinda - Rheolwr Samplau a Llywodraethu

    Lucinda

    Lucinda Hopkins

    Technician, Division of Psychological Medicine and Clinical Neurosciences

    Email:
    hopkinsl6@caerdydd.ac.uk
    Telephone:
    +44 (0)29 2068 8365

    Dwi’n rheoli’r samplau DNA sy’n cael eu casglu ar gyfer MAGES. Mae hyn yn cynnwys cadw cofnodion o union leoliad yr holl samplau yn y labordy ac unrhyw waith labordy sy’n cael ei wneud arnynt.

    Fel rheolwr samplau a llywodraethu ar gyfer Canolfan y Cyngor Ymchwil Feddygol ar gyfer Geneteg Niwroseiciatrig a Genomeg, dwi’n rheoli dros 10,000 o samplau ymchwil. Dwi hefyd yn sicrhau bod ein storfa a’n defnydd o samplau yn cydymffurfio â rheoliadau moeseg ymchwil.

    Y tu allan i’r gwaith dwi’n dwlu treulio amser gyda fy nheulu a ffrindiau ac yn mwynhau dawnsio neuadd, teithio a mynd i weld sioeau cerdd a chyngherddau.

    Mae'r cynnwys hwn ar gael yn Saesneg yn unig.

    Each year as many as 1 in 20 young people will be diagnosed with depression. Both boys and girls can be affected, although girls are twice as likely to experience it as boys.

    UK guidelines stress the need for good information and psychological/talking and social therapies, backed by strong evidence.

    Developing a resource

    As part of a National Institute for Health Research (NIHRI) / Health and Care Research Wales doctoral fellowship, we developed a web programme called MoodHwb to help with low mood and depression in young people and their parents/carers.

    MoodHwb has been co-designed with young people and parents/carers and aims to engage young people, promote self-help and help-seeking where appropriate. It uses developmentally appropriate language, illustrations, animations and interactive components (e.g. profile-building, mood monitoring, goal-setting).

    There are several ways to personalise the programme and there is a section for families/carers, friends and professionals – in part to promote social support. It also includes resources for other issues commonly experienced alongside depression (e.g. anxiety).

    The programme is multi-platform, and there is an accompanying ‘app’, which includes the interactive components and a mobile-friendly version of the main site. It is available in English and Welsh ('hwb' is the Welsh translation for 'hub', and also means a 'lift' or 'boost').

    There is more information on its design and development in the paper: A Web-Based Psychoeducational Intervention for Adolescent Depression: Design and Development of MoodHwb

    Future of the programme

    During an early evaluation, young people, parents/carers and professionals reported that MoodHwb was engaging, clear, easy to use and helpful. The feedback contributed to the refinement of the programme.

    We aim to test this new version in schools and primary mental health services in Wales and Scotland, as part of an NIHR/Health and Care Research Wales Post-Doctoral Fellowship.

    This work will help ensure that it is closer to being rolled-out as an early intervention programme in health, education, youth and social services/charities.

    Research team

    Rhys Bevan Jones

    Dr Rhys Bevan-Jones

    Uwch Gymrawd Ymchwil Clinigol, Adran Meddygaeth Seicolegol a Niwrowyddorau Clinigol

    Siarad Cymraeg
    Email:
    bevanjonesr1@caerdydd.ac.uk
    Telephone:
    +44 29206 88451
    Anita Thapar

    Yr Athro Anita Thapar

    Clinical Professor, Division of Psychological Medicine and Clinical Neurosciences

    Email:
    thapar@caerdydd.ac.uk
    Telephone:
    +44 (0)29 2068 8478
    Frances Rice

    Yr Athro Frances Rice

    Senior Lecturer, Division of Psychological Medicine and Clinical Neurosciences

    Email:
    ricef2@caerdydd.ac.uk
    Telephone:
    +44 (0)29 2068 8384

    Mae'r cynnwys hwn ar gael yn Saesneg yn unig.

    Despite being present in 3-5% of children, ADHD remains misunderstood and there is a great deal of stigma associated with having ADHD.

    Children and their families often face challenges when they are first diagnosed with ADHD. One challenge is accessing information and resources about ADHD, particularly those that can explain ADHD to children affected by the condition. The few resources that are currently available are not fit for purpose and are not targeted at children aged 7-11 years (the age group when ADHD is most likely to be diagnosed in the UK).

    Research approach

    We are working together with local ADHD parent support groups to develop an animation video for children aged 7-11 years about what it means to have ADHD. This video will be based on our research as well as ideas and opinions from people with lived experienced of ADHD.

    This project is funded by the ISSF3 Public Engagement Proof-of-Concept Wellcome Trust award.

    We will conduct a series of focus groups to develop and revise a storyboard for a three-minute animation. Professionals from clinical services will be asked for their opinions to ensure that the animation provides information in an accurate and accessible way.

    The culmination of this project will be a launch event to celebrate the work of those involved, get feedback on the animation and promote the animation to ADHD support groups across South Wales, clinicians and relevant academics.

    Proposed outcome

    The animation will be a valuable resource to support children diagnosed with ADHD and in line with NICE UK guideline emphasis on provision of psychoeducation to those diagnosed with ADHD.

    This animation will be readily available for families via support groups and clinical services. This will be a starting point for the development of a more comprehensive support package for individuals diagnosed with ADHD and their families/carers.

    It is hoped that this process will also help cement collaborations between our child and adolescent psychiatry team, local ADHD support groups and professionals from clinical services.

    Research team

    SharifahAgha

    Dr Sharifah Shameem Agha

    Honorary Lecturer, Division of Psychological Medicine and Clinical Neurosciences

    Email:
    aghas10@caerdydd.ac.uk
    Telephone:
    +44 (0)29 2068 8453
    Dr Kate Langley

    Dr Kate Langley

    Senior Lecturer

    Email:
    langleyk@caerdydd.ac.uk
    Telephone:
    +44 (0)29 2087 6259
    Anita Thapar

    Yr Athro Anita Thapar

    Clinical Professor, Division of Psychological Medicine and Clinical Neurosciences

    Email:
    thapar@caerdydd.ac.uk
    Telephone:
    +44 (0)29 2068 8478
    Rhys Bevan Jones

    Dr Rhys Bevan-Jones

    Uwch Gymrawd Ymchwil Clinigol, Adran Meddygaeth Seicolegol a Niwrowyddorau Clinigol

    Siarad Cymraeg
    Email:
    bevanjonesr1@caerdydd.ac.uk
    Telephone:
    +44 29206 88451
    Photograph of Paul Gauci

    Paul Gauci

    Communications Assistant, Division of Psychological Medicine and Clinical Neurosciences

    Email:
    gaucip1@caerdydd.ac.uk
    Telephone:
    +44 (0)29 2068 8425

    We are also collaborating with Sarah Jane Bailey, founder of ADHD Cardiff.

    Training and knowledge mobilisation

    Our aim is to support and develop talented people, enabling them to become tomorrow's scientists who investigate young people's mental health.

    We are embedded within the NHS with strong research, training and clinical links to health boards across Wales. We provide training in youth mental health to undergraduate medical students, specialist doctors in child and adolescent psychiatry and other practitioners.

    Our activities in this area include:

    • helping teaching staff and other relevant professionals understand more about children’s difficulties and the types of support these children may need through our links with the Neurodevelopment Assessment Unit
    • shaping the way clinical services are configured, for instance in the creation of cross-diagnosis and cross-discipline child neurodevelopmental clinics and the successfully piloting of age 15 – 25 year clinical transition service
    • contributions via an expert reference group to a national government review on Child and Adolescent Mental Health Service provision and presentation to a sub-committee of MPs at Westminster as part of the Youth Parliament UK campaign on mental health services
    • Professor Thapar is joint-lead editor of the leading textbook used by practitioners training to specialise in child and adolescent psychiatrists; Rutter's Child and Adolescent Psychiatry

    Engagement

    We actively contribute to public engagement through the MRC Centre, our partnership with the National Centre for Mental Health and by participating in the annual Cardiff University Brain Games.

    Our team

    Anita Thapar

    Yr Athro Anita Thapar

    Clinical Professor, Division of Psychological Medicine and Clinical Neurosciences

    Email:
    thapar@caerdydd.ac.uk
    Telephone:
    +44 (0)29 2068 8478
    Stephan Collishaw

    Yr Athro Stephan Collishaw

    Senior Lecturer, Division of Psychological Medicine and Clinical Neurosciences

    Email:
    collishaws@caerdydd.ac.uk
    Telephone:
    +44 (0)29 2068 8436
    Frances Rice

    Yr Athro Frances Rice

    Senior Lecturer, Division of Psychological Medicine and Clinical Neurosciences

    Email:
    ricef2@caerdydd.ac.uk
    Telephone:
    +44 (0)29 2068 8384
    Dr Kate Langley

    Dr Kate Langley

    Senior Lecturer

    Email:
    langleyk@caerdydd.ac.uk
    Telephone:
    +44 (0)29 2087 6259
    Ajay Thapar

    Dr Ajay Thapar

    Psychiatrist, Division of Psychological Medicine and Clinical Neurosciences

    Email:
    thaparak@caerdydd.ac.uk
    Telephone:
    +44 (0)29 2068 8490
    Rhys Bevan Jones

    Dr Rhys Bevan-Jones

    Uwch Gymrawd Ymchwil Clinigol, Adran Meddygaeth Seicolegol a Niwrowyddorau Clinigol

    Siarad Cymraeg
    Email:
    bevanjonesr1@caerdydd.ac.uk
    Telephone:
    +44 29206 88451
    Joanna Martin

    Joanna Martin

    Research Associate, Division of Psychological Medicine and Clinical Neurosciences

    Email:
    martinjm1@caerdydd.ac.uk
    Lucy Riglin

    Dr Lucy Riglin

    Research Associate, Division of Psychological Medicine and Clinical Neurosciences

    Email:
    riglinl@caerdydd.ac.uk
    Telephone:
    +44 (0)29 2068 8419
    SharifahAgha

    Dr Sharifah Shameem Agha

    Honorary Lecturer, Division of Psychological Medicine and Clinical Neurosciences

    Email:
    aghas10@caerdydd.ac.uk
    Telephone:
    +44 (0)29 2068 8453
    Joanne Doherty

    Dr Joanne Doherty

    Clinical Research Fellow, Division of Psychological Medicine and Clinical Neurosciences

    Email:
    dohertyjl@caerdydd.ac.uk
    Telephone:
    +44 (0)29 2068 8455
    OlgaEyre

    Dr Olga Eyre

    Clinical Research Fellow, Division of Psychological Medicine and Clinical Neurosciences

    Email:
    eyreo2@caerdydd.ac.uk
    Telephone:
    +44 (0)29 2068 8452
    Naomi Warne

    Naomi Warne

    Research Assistant, Division of Psychological Medicine and Clinical Neurosciences

    Email:
    warnen@caerdydd.ac.uk
    Telephone:
    +44 (0)29 2068 8473
    Sarah Rook

    Sarah Rook

    Research Assistant, Division of Psychological Medicine and Clinical Neurosciences

    Email:
    rooks@caerdydd.ac.uk
    Telephone:
    +44 (0)29 2068 8392
    student

    Victoria Powell

    Research student

    Email:
    powellv@caerdydd.ac.uk

    Bryony Weavers

    Research Assistant, Division of Psychological Medicine and Clinical Neurosciences

    Email:
    weaversb1@caerdydd.ac.uk
    Telephone:
    +44 (0)29 2068 8318

    Alice Stephens

    Research Assistant, Division of Psychological Medicine and Clinical Neurosciences

    Email:
    stephensa7@caerdydd.ac.uk
    Telephone:
    +44 (0)29 2068 8389

    Jessica Lennon

    Psychology Assistant, Division of Psychological Medicine and Clinical Neurosciences

    Email:
    lennonj@caerdydd.ac.uk

    Emma Meilak

    Administrative Officer, Division of Psychological Medicine and Clinical Neurosciences

    Email:
    meilake@caerdydd.ac.uk
    Telephone:
    +44 29206 88479
    Photograph of Caroline Warren

    Caroline Warren

    PA to Professor Anita Thapar

    Email:
    childpsychsec@caerdydd.ac.uk
    Telephone:
    +44 (0)29 2068 8478

    Internal collaborators

    Simon Murphy

    Yr Athro Simon Murphy

    Athro Gwella Iechyd Cyhoeddus, Prif Archwiliwr (PI) ar gyfer PHIRN a Chyd-Gyfarwyddwr Caerdydd ar gyfer DECIPHer

    Email:
    murphys7@caerdydd.ac.uk
    Telephone:
    +44 29208 79144
    Michael O'Donovan

    Yr Athro Michael O'Donovan

    Deputy Director, Institute of Psychological Medicine and Clinical Neurosciences. Deputy Director, MRC Centre for Neuropsychiatric Genetics & Genomics

    Email:
    odonovanmc@caerdydd.ac.uk
    Telephone:
    +44 (0)29 2068 8320

    Richard Anney

    Senior Lecturer in Bioinformatics, Division of Psychological Medicine and Clinical Neurosciences

    Email:
    anneyr@caerdydd.ac.uk
    Telephone:
    +44 (0)29 208 8390
    Marianne Van Den Bree

    Marianne van den Bree

    Professor, Division of Psychological Medicine and Clinical Neurosciences

    Email:
    vandenbreemb@caerdydd.ac.uk
    Telephone:
    +44 (0)29 2068 8433
    Professor Stephanie van Goozen

    Yr Athro Stephanie van Goozen

    Professor

    Email:
    vangoozens@caerdydd.ac.uk
    Telephone:
    +44(0)29 2087 4630
    Dr Katherine Shelton

    Dr Katherine Shelton

    Senior Lecturer

    Email:
    sheltonkh1@caerdydd.ac.uk
    Telephone:
    +44(0)29 2087 6093

    External collaborators