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Language stages

We have developed a range of stages in the study of modern languages to determine a level of proficiency for each module in the pathway to a degree.

Our pathway to a degree in modern languages requires you to start at stage E or above so you will need to have a certain level of competence in your chosen language or languages.

Levels of competency

Determining your level of language competency can be difficult but we have developed a set of descriptions to help:

Recommended level of competence at entry Stage Level of competence reached at end of the module CEFR
You have recently completed an A-level in the language studied and you are ready to take it a step further (four year's part-time study or A-Level in the language studied).  E You should have a sufficient range of language to be able to understand descriptions and arguments on most topics related to family, hobbies and interests, work, travel and current events. You should be able to identify unfamiliar words from the context on topics related to your field or interests.  Preparation for B1
You have a very good working knowledge of the language and you want a stimulating course to match and stretch your competencies (five years part-time study or advanced stage E).  F You should be able with some effort to be able to keep up with fast and colloquial discussions. You should be able to understand detailed information reliably.  Preparation for B2
You have an excellent command of the language and use it on a regular basis. This level will enhance your near-native language skills (six years part-time study or advanced stage F).  G You should have a good command of broad lexical repertoire and a good command of idiomatic expressions and colloquialisms. You should be able to understand language effectively for social purposes, including emotional, allusive and joking usage.  Preparation for

What to expect at each stage

Stage E

You further develop your oral, aural and written language skills in order to express yourself confidently on most general topics, without much conspicuous searching for words, using some complex sentence forms to do so.

You will consolidate and expand your understanding of the structure of the language and of the culture of the countries where the language is spoken. The themes that might be covered include:

  • tourism
  • food and drink
  • health
  • European Union
  • political organisation.

Stage F

You will develop your oral, aural and written language skills in order to express yourself fluently and spontaneously. You will also be introduced to mediation skills. You will further consolidate and expand your understanding of the structure of the language and the culture of the countries where the language is spoken.

A wide range of topics will be covered which might include:

  • everyday life
  • current affairs
  • issues regarding the language studied
  • culture
  • society
  • politics.

Stage G

You will expand your oral, aural and written language skills in order to develop a detailed knowledge and effective understanding of structures, registers and linguistic principles. Your mediation skills will be further expanded. You will acquire an effective operational proficiency in the language studied which allows fluent, spontaneous communication.

Themes studied may include:

  • culture
  • literature
  • media
  • current affairs.

Contact us

If you have any queries or need any further information about deciding on a stage to study, please contact:

Languages