Ewch i’r prif gynnwys
Dr Joe Williams

Dr Joe Williams

Lecturer in Human Geography

Email
williamsj168@cardiff.ac.uk
Campuses
1.59, Adeilad Morgannwg, Rhodfa’r Brenin Edward VII, Caerdydd, CF10 3WA
Users
Ar gael fel goruchwyliwr ôl-raddedig

Trosolwg

I am a Human Geographer, based in the School of Geography and Planning. My research aims to understand the changing relationships between environment and society. My main areas of interest are in:

  • Urban political ecology
  • The politics of water and energy infrastructure
  • Global development and environment

I teach on a range of topics within Geography, including global environmental challenges, development and social science research methods.

Bywgraffiad

Qualifications

  • PhD Human Geography, University of Manchester, 2017.
  • MSc Environment and Development, University of Edinburgh, 2012.
  • BA Geography, University of Manchester, 2011.

Career

  • Lecturer in Human Geography, Cardiff University, 2021–present.
  • Lecturer in Human Geography, University of Bristol, 2020–2021.
  • Assistant Professor in Human Geography, Durham University, 2017–2020.
  • Teaching Fellow in Geography, Durham University, 2016–2017.

Membership

  • Fellow of the Royal Geographical Society.
  • Fellow of the UK Higher Education Academy.

Academic Appointments

  • External Examiner at Glasgow Caledonian University, 2019–2023.
  • External Examiner at University of Gloucestershire, 2020–2024.

My research focusses on the politics of water and energy infrastructure as a lens for critically understanding social and ecological challenges, such as climate change. My current work looks at how infrastructure corridors are changing the geographies of global development, with an empirical focus on the financialization of water services in Kenya.

I have a long-standing research interest in the proliferation of seawater desalination as a source of ‘new’ water in diverse contexts around the world, particularly in cities. Although not well understood, desalination now supplies water for about half a billion people globally and has quietly become one of the most important urban metabolic transformations in the 21st Century, offering important insights on how societies are responding to issues like water security.

My research has been published in a wide range of international academic journals, as well as books and online collections.

Supervision

Unedau Ymchwil