French and English Literature (BA)

Entry year

2018/19 2019/20

The joint honours degree in French and English Literature provides you with the opportunity of specialising in two university honours subjects.

Our aim at the School of Modern Languages and the School of English, Communication and Philosophy is to develop and educate our students to become ‘global citizens’.  By combining French and English Literature you will gain a variety of transferable skills and knowledge beneficial to the world of employment, making you competitive and attractive in an increasingly global workforce and opening the doors to a variety of career paths.  

English literature at Cardiff has long enjoyed an international reputation for its teaching and research. But more than this – we pride ourselves on nurturing a friendly, personalised and supportive environment for our students. We aim for the best and for success in all we do.

Our curriculum offers access to the whole span of English literature, from the Anglo-Saxon period to the 21st century. Nor is the curriculum restricted to the printed word – we are intrigued by the connections between literature and film, art, music, history, language and popular culture, and our teaching reflects these interests.

There are no compulsory modules in English literature at Cardiff after year one. We give you choice – but we also give you the skills and knowledge to make informed decisions from a diverse range of options which includes creative writing.

In addition to developing high-level language skills, you will gain an in-depth intercultural understanding that encompasses a specific knowledge of French cultures and communication and critical-thinking skills, which foster resilience and independence through time spent in immersive foreign language contexts.

France is a major actor on the European and world stage, possessing a rich and sophisticated culture. French is one of the official working languages of the European Union and of the United Nations.

We offer French for both advanced students and beginners. In your first year, in addition to your language tuition, an introduction to French history and culture seeks to provide a solid foundation for more specialised studies as you progress through your course.

Your understanding of the language will be further developed and refined during your year abroad, when you will experience life in a French-speaking country at first hand. 

In the final year, you have the opportunity to write a dissertation, which stimulates initiative and can serve as a useful preparation for postgraduate study. 

It is important to remember that studying languages is not just about the language itself, it involves exploring many aspects of a country, and we aspire to offer a genuinely broad course that offers challenging and stimulating modules. 

As a joint honours student, you will find that often there are complementary issues and perspectives that link subjects, be they critical analysis, historical contexts or recent research. On completion of this four-year programme, you will have a high level of language proficiency, as well as a critical understanding of key aspects of French history, culture, literature, politics and contemporary society.   

 

Distinctive features

  • Research-led teaching that allows you to engage with new ideas that are helping to shape the future of English Literature and French studies.
  • High-quality language teaching delivered by native speakers.
  • A vibrant programme of extra-curricular activities to support your language learning and immersion into French culture, including extra optional conversation classes with Erasmus students, events at l’Alliance Française and the students’French Society.
  • A curriculum with a clear learning arc, drawing on the latest research and providing a thorough understanding of French culture.
  • A structured skills programme which embeds academic, transferable and employability skills into learning from the very beginning.
  • The option of taking a credit-bearing work placement.
  • The opportunity to spend your third year either studying or working in France or a French speaking country.
  • An exciting range of opportunities beyond your formal studies to engage with local schools and communities in promoting language learning and develop your own skills and profile.

Key facts

UCAS CodeRQ13
Next intakeSeptember 2018
Duration4 years
ModeFull time
Typical places availableThe School typically has 185 places available.
Typical applications receivedThe School typically receives 600 applications.
Contact

Entry requirements

Typical A level offerABB including an A in English Literature, or English Literature and Language, or Creative Writing. Applicants holding a B in French will have access to the Languages advanced pathways. Please note that General Studies will not be accepted.   
Typical Welsh Baccalaureate offerThe Welsh Baccalaureate Advanced Skills Challenge Certificate will be accepted in lieu of one A-Level (at the grades listed above), excluding any specified subjects.
Typical International Baccalaureate offerIB 32-30, or 665 in 3 HL subjects including 6 at HL in English Literature, English Language and Literature or English Liteature and Performance.
Alternative qualificationsAlternative qualifications may be accepted. For further information on entry requirements, see the School of English, Communication & Philosophy and School of Modern Languages admissions criteria pages.
English Language requirementsIf you are an overseas applicant and your first language is not English, please visit our English Language requirements page for more information on our accepted qualifications.
Other requirementsYou will require GCSE English or Welsh Language at grade B or grade 4. Alternatively, IGCSE English First Language or English Second Language will be considered at grade C.  Other qualifications (inc Scottish Highers, Irish Leaving Certificate, Cambridge Pre-U, etc.): Alternative qualifications may be accepted. For further information on entry requirements, see the School of English, Communication & Philosophy and School of Modern Languages admissions criteria pages. Typical IELTS offer: 6.5 with, at least, 6.0 in each component.

We are currently working with our students to update and improve the content of this course. The information shown below reflects the current curriculum and is likely to change. The review of the course is expected to be completed by August 2018 and this page will be updated by end of October 2018 to reflect the changes.

The BA French and English Literature is a four-year degree programme. It is structured in such a way that you will acquire high-level language competencies, combined with the skills to become an independent and critical thinker, equipped for professional employment.

In each year of the programme you will study 120 credits, equally split between 60 credits in English Literature and 60 credits in French. Your third year will be spent studying or working abroad in France or another French-speaking country.

The modules shown are an example of the typical curriculum and will be reviewed prior to the 2018/19 academic year. The final modules will be published by September 2018.

Year one

You will combine 60 credits of French with 60 credits of English Literature.

Your first year in English Literature is a foundation year designed to equip you with the skills for advanced study and to give you an overview of the subject that will enable you to make informed choices from the modules available in years two and three.

In year one we run two language pathways for students; an advanced pathway for students with an A-level or equivalent competence in French and a beginner’s pathway for students with limited or no knowledge of French. Year one contains a 40-credit core French language module and a 20 credit transnational module introducing you to French history, society and culture from a global perspective. The first year of this programme provides a thorough foundation in the grammar of the language for those students on the beginner’s pathway, and develops the linguistic skills for post A-level students on the advanced pathway.

You will also study a non-language module which introduces you to the development of France as a nation, exploring what it has symbolised for different groups at different moments in history. It also explores France’s exchanges with the world, enabling you to explore France’s role beyond the national borders. The module will enable you to develop a good understanding of intercultural awareness, and the highly-prized ability to mediate between cultures.  

Module titleModule codeCredits
National and Global Perspectives on FranceML618720 credits
Critical Reading and Critical WritingSE214620 credits
Module titleModule codeCredits
Drama: Stage and PageSE213920 credits
Star-cross'd Lovers: the Politics of DesireSE214020 credits
Transforming Visions: Text and ImageSE214220 credits
Transgressive Bodies in Medieval LiteratureSE214720 credits
Ways of ReadingSE214820 credits
Module titleModule codeCredits
Advanced French Language Year 1ML618840 credits
Beginners French Language Year 1ML618940 credits

Year two

In year two you will again take 60 credits in English Literature and 60 credits in French.

In year two there are no compulsory English Literature modules. You may select from a range of modules based on period, genre or theme in which you will be reading a variety of texts in their historical and cultural contexts.

The language elements of year two build on the work undertaken in year one, and prepare you for your year abroad.

In addition to language, you will study 30 credits looking at France in a transnational context. This will introduce you to key approaches, methodologies and critical tools which you can apply to an in-depth study of a range of topics, such as culture, history and politics.

Outside of your formal studies, you will have the opportunity to take part in our highly-praised Student Mentoring Scheme, supported by the Welsh Assembly Government. Pupils in selected secondary schools are mentored by our specially-trained undergraduate students who go into schools to mentor pupils in small groups of two or three over a period of five weeks.

You may also choose to take part in the Student Language Ambassador (SLA) scheme, acting as advocates for language learning. Following specific training, as an SLA you may get the opportunity to speak publicly at events, sharing your personal experience of language learning. You may take part in a range of activities, such as language taster sessions, presenting and promoting the year abroad, supporting School language days and events, or promoting modern languages at career fairs or open days.

Year three: Sandwich year

Your third year is spent in France or another French-speaking country. The year abroad will enable you to develop your language skills, deepen your understanding of the French culture and develop your independence, resourcefulness and resilience.

Your options will include:

  • studying at one of our partner universities;
  • working as an English assistant in a school through the British Council Scheme, or
  • working for a French organisation or company. 

If you choose the study option, we have established exchange programmes which provide opportunities to study in institutions in cities that have included Paris, Toulouse, Chambéry, Grenoble, Lyon, Clermont-Ferrand, Montpellier and Nantes. We also have academic links with Brussels and Geneva.

Placements for teaching assistants on a scheme run by the British Council can take you to either a major city or a small, rural town. This option provides first-hand teaching experience and allows 

you to earn a salary sufficient to live on, although you only work on a part-time basis. Prior to the start of your placement, the British Council provides a training weekend in the destination country. In addition, the school you have been assigned to should also guide you in your role as a teacher and help you to find a place to live.

The third option consists of a work placement with an organisation or company in the French-speaking world. The necessary arrangements can be made through personal contacts you may have or by approaching organisations directly. The School can also assist you in finding suitable work placements. In order to ensure that your work placement affords you plenty of opportunity to speak French and provides you with a beneficial experience, such arrangements will require prior approval by the School.

No matter what you choose, the year abroad is a great opportunity for you to improve your understanding of the language, immerse yourself in another culture, and gain international study or work experience. It is also excellent preparation for your final year and gives you a level of self-confidence and maturity that has proven popular with employers.        

Year four

When we welcome you back to Cardiff in your final year, you will continue to develop your language skills, studying 30 credits of French language and a 30 credit French optional module, in addition to 60 credits in English Literature.

You will by now have gained experience of a variety of literary periods, topics, genres and approaches, developing your critical faculties and your skills in analysing texts and contexts. You will therefore be in an excellent position to choose between a range of more specialised modules that engage with current issues in research and scholarship in relation to authors and texts both well-known and possibly less well-known to you.

You will have the opportunity to build on the broad base of knowledge and skills you have developed to study an area of research expertise, through taught modules and/or a dissertation. You will also have the opportunity to take part in our very popular teaching module, an accredited module where you will build on study and workshops at the University to undertake a teaching placement at one of our partner schools in the area.

Module titleModule codeCredits
High-Level Proficiency in French LanguageML636630 credits
Module titleModule codeCredits
Culture, Political Protest & Dissent in the 1960sML136030 credits
European Cinema: Thinking the Real of FictionML136230 credits
Student Teaching ModuleML136330 credits
Final Year Dissertation - French (in English/Welsh)ML626230 credits
France & The Second World War: History & MemoryML636030 credits
Final Year Dissertation - French (in French)ML636130 credits
Conflict, Consensus & The French Labour MovementML636430 credits
The Robin Hood TraditionSE236720 credits
The Illustrated BookSE239520 credits
Modern Welsh Writing in EnglishSE244820 credits
Fictive Histories/Historical FictionsSE246720 credits
DissertationSE252420 credits
HitchcockSE254420 credits
Modern Drama: Page, Stage, ScreenSE255120 credits
Utopia: Suffrage to CyberpunkSE258120 credits
Second-generation Romantic PoetsSE258220 credits
Bluestockings, Britannia, Unsexed Females: Women in Public Life, 1770-1800SE258820 credits
Gothic Fiction: The VictoriansSE258920 credits
Postcolonial TheorySE259320 credits
Visions of Past and Future in Children's LiteratureSE259520 credits
Military Masculinities in the Long Nineteenth CenturySE259720 credits
Island Stories: Literatures of the North AtlanticSE259820 credits
American Poetry after ModernismSE260620 credits
The American Short StorySE260920 credits
Renaissance DramaSE261020 credits
Apocalypse Then and NowSE261120 credits
Criminal ShakespeareSE261220 credits
Scandal and Outrage: Controversial Literature of the Twentieth and Twenty-First CenturiesSE261320 credits
Writing Nature from Romanticism to the PresentSE261420 credits
The High Drama of Work: Taskscapes in Early Modern PlaysSE261520 credits
Representing Race in Contemporary AmericaSE261620 credits
The University is committed to providing a wide range of module options where possible, but please be aware that whilst every effort is made to offer choice this may be limited in certain circumstances. This is due to the fact that some modules have limited numbers of places available, which are allocated on a first-come, first-served basis, while others have minimum student numbers required before they will run, to ensure that an appropriate quality of education can be delivered; some modules require students to have already taken particular subjects, and others are core or required on the programme you are taking. Modules may also be limited due to timetable clashes, and although the University works to minimise disruption to choice, we advise you to seek advice from the relevant School on the module choices available.

How will I be taught?

Most of our modules consist of a mixture of lectures, seminars and language classes that enable you to develop communication and analytical skills, and to develop critical thinking in a supportive environment. The teaching covers all the key competencies, and is enhanced by the inclusion of digital learning.

Lectures provide an overview of the key concepts and frameworks for a topic, equipping you to carry out independent research for the seminars and to develop your own ideas.

Seminars provide an opportunity for you to engage critically with key ideas and explore the ideas outlined in lectures in a small group environment, usually consisting of around 15 students and the seminar leader (a member of the teaching team). Seminars may take various formats, including plenary group discussion, small group work and student-led presentations.

Language classes are taught in groups to enhance confidence and active learning. A varied timetable includes oral expression, aural comprehension and writing skills, which are taught in small groups to enhance confidence and active learning. These vital communication skills are practised and developed through regular classwork exercises and written work. Our teaching methods allow you to engage with a range of language-learning technologies. Materials including textbooks, videos, films, novels, audio files and websites are supported by online resources that complement classroom activities and promote and enable independent learning. Class materials include a range from literary and historical to contemporary journalistic texts, providing a broad insight into language and culture.

Independent study forms a key part of your learning, and our independent learning portfolios have been developed to provide you with online resources to support your independent language learning.

How will I spend my time? (2017/18 data)

Year 1

Scheduled learning and teaching activities

19%

Guided independent study

81%

Placements

0%

Year 2

Scheduled learning and teaching activities

null%

Guided independent study

null%

Placements

null%

Year 3

Scheduled learning and teaching activities

0%

Guided independent study

0%

Placements

100%

Year 4

Scheduled learning and teaching activities

23%

Guided independent study

75%

Placements

2%

How will I be supported?

Our BA programme in French and English Literature is team-taught, with the programme as a whole overseen by the Programme Director. You will be supported by a number of different staff, some focussing on academic performance in a particular area and some looking at learning and progress more holistically.

All academic staff have designated hours where they are available to meet with you to offer advice and feedback on the subjects that they teach.

You will also be allocated a personal tutor, who will meet with you regularly to reflect on your progress and development across your studies, and to think about how to build on your achievements and advance further. The personal tutor can also guide you if you are experiencing difficulties towards appropriate support.

While you are away from Cardiff, you will be assigned a Year Abroad Coordinator, who will keep in touch with you and monitor your progress. You may also get a visit from one of your lecturers who will be keen to find out how you are getting on.

A skills development week each semester allows for guided study and a chance to catch up on assessed work, reading and revision. These weeks are also used by staff to visit students on their year abroad. 

You will have access through the Learning Central to relevant learning resources, presentations, lecture handouts, bibliographies, further links, electronic exercises and discussion circles.

Our undergraduate Professional Services Team provides academic and student support for all programmes. The team are located in a dedicated ‘student hub’ within the School and provide information and guidance in response to any queries you may have. We also have a dedicated Student Support Administrative Officer within the School, who can provide you with the necessary advice and guidance in a supportive, caring and confidential environment.

We pride ourselves on the level of engagement we have with our student body, giving you the opportunity to express your opinions and be partners in School decision-making where possible. We survey students regularly to make sure we are always working in your best interests.   

The University offers a range of services including the Careers Service, the Counselling Service, the Disability and Dyslexia Service, the Student Support Service, the Academic Skills Development Centre and excellent libraries and resource centres.

Feedback

Feedback on your work is given frequently and in a wide variety of formats and is intended to help you identify strengths and weaknesses in your learning, as well as give indications of how you might improve in your performance in examinations and coursework.

You will be given general feedback in relation to examinations following the examination period and you will be able to discuss your overall performance with your personal tutor as part of the monitored student self-assessment scheme.

How will I be assessed?

The focus of assessment is in supporting you to develop your ideas, skills and competencies, with the feedback you receive feeding forward into future work.

We use traditional assessment formats (such as essays, class tests, case studies, exams and dissertation) as well as more innovative forms of assessment, (such as blogs, participation in radio shows, video and audio projects, interviews, portfolios, and so forth).

Assessments include formative assessments (which enable you to develop your skills and do not count towards your final degree classification) and summative assessments (which do count towards your final classification).

As part of your skills training in year one, you will be supported in understanding how the assessments work, what is expected of you, how you will be marked and how to make the most of your feedback.

Assessment methods (2017/18 data)

Year 1

Written exams

45%

Practical exams

3%

Coursework

52%

Year 2

Written exams

null%

Practical exams

null%

Coursework

null%

Year 3

Written exams

0%

Practical exams

0%

Coursework

100%

Year 4

Written exams

35%

Practical exams

9%

Coursework

56%

What skills will I practise and develop?

Knowledge & Understanding:

On successful completion of the Programme you will be able to demonstrate:

  • The ability to speak, write, and understand one or more foreign languages to a high level of competency.
  • An in-depth intercultural understanding including specific knowledge of other cultures, allied to the ability to navigate and mediate between more than one culture.
  • The ability to read texts closely and critically with a clear understanding of how form, genre, and style inform meaning.
  • Independent, informed interpretations of individual texts.
  • The ability to formulate and write clear, grammatical, and independent, argumentative literary analyses.
  • The ability to synthesise and present a diverse range of materials.

Intellectual Skills:

On successful completion of the Programme you will be able to demonstrate:

  • Enhanced linguistic skills, as well as a broad appreciation of the culture, literature, and history of France and French speaking countries.
  • The ability to communicate clearly, concisely and persuasively in writing and speech, in English and French.
  • Critical reading, independent research, and writing skills.
  • Skills in literary analysis, interpretative reading, and written expression.
  • Analytical skills and developing instinct towards independent and informed, researched interpretation.

Professional Practical Skills:

On successful completion of the Programme you will be able to demonstrate:

  • Using a range of IT programmes and digital media, where appropriate.
  • Resilience and independence through time spent in immersive foreign language contexts.
  • Communication and critical-thinking skills.
  • Working to deadlines and priorities, managing a range of tasks at the same time.
  • Skills when working as part of a team, developing a collaborative approach to problem-solving.

Transferable/Key Skills:

On successful completion of the Programme you will be able to demonstrate:

  • The ability to grasp complex issues with confidence.
  • The ability to analyse complex texts.
  • The ability to interpret and apply relevant data.
  • Practical research skills.
  • Imaginative solutions of your own that are rooted in evidence.
  • Learning from constructive criticism and incorporate its insights.
  • Taking responsibility for your own learning programme and professional development.
  • Critical skills (reasoning, evaluating evidence, problem-solving, relating theory to practice).
  • Creativity and innovative thinking.
  • Leadership, teamwork and self-management skills.
  • The ability to identify, record and communicate your relevant career attainments.

 

Other information

What do employers think about this Programme

As part of the curriculum design, the School consulted with employers’ organisations about the attributes they look for in graduates. Employers highlighted the importance of intercultural awareness and the ability to write well in English, both of which are key learning outcomes for the programme, in addition to developing super language skills and the ability to think critically analytically.

School of Modern Languages

In 2015/16, 94% of the School’s graduates who were available for work reported they were in employment and/or further study within six months of graduation.

Many graduates enjoy their year overseas so much that they take time out for more travel, or go abroad on graduation in search of employment.    

Of those who choose to remain in the UK, many pursue postgraduate studies such as one of the School’s Postgraduate Taught degrees or a PGCE. Others start work immediately following their studies, and our graduates go on to secure excellent careers in international diplomacy, the Civil Service, teaching, business and journalism. Other employment options include roles as translators, language assistants, export assistants and proof-readers.   

School of English, Communication and Philosophy

In 2015/16, 95% of the School’s graduates who were available for work reported they were in employment and/or further study within six months of graduation.

We provide our students with a highly satisfying academic experience that assists their development as critically-minded, culturally-aware citizens whose high analytic skills, powers of expression and progressive self-reliance make them extremely attractive to employers.

English literature graduates have excellent analytic and communication skills that fit them for a full range of professions and further training. Their cultural expertise and intellectual abilities are valued in the public and private sector, and in contexts as varied as the classroom, the law courts or the media.

 

Tuition fees

UK and EU students (2018/19)

Tuition feeDepositNotes
£9,000None

The University reserves the right to increase tuition fees in the second and subsequent years of a course as permitted by law or Welsh Government policy. Where applicable we will notify you of any change in tuition fee by the end of June in the academic year before the one in which the fee will increase.

Visit our tuition fee pages for the latest information.

Financial support may be available to individuals who meet certain criteria. For more information visit our funding section. Please note that these sources of financial support are limited and therefore not everyone who meets the criteria are guaranteed to receive the support.

Students from outside the EU (2018/19)

Tuition feeDepositNotes
£16,350None

Tuition fees for international students are fixed for the majority of three year undergraduate courses. This means the price you pay in year one will be the same in years two and three. Some courses are exempt, including four and five year programmes and Medical and Dental courses. Visit our tuition fee pages for the latest information.

Will I need any specific equipment to study this course/programme?

Many students choose to invest in personal copies of unabridged bilingual dictionaries and reference grammars. While copies of most course materials are available in the library, many students opt to acquire personal copies of set texts.

Accomodation

We have a range of residences to suit your needs and budget. Find out more on our accommodation pages.

Each candidate's profile is considered as a complete picture, taking into account your interest in and suitability for the degree, as shown in your personal statement and referee's report, as well as achieved and predicted grades. Your ability to present an argument, evidence of intellectual curiosity and your enthusiasm for and commitment to studying will also be assessed.

If you are interested in teaching, you may have the possibility of completing an internship teaching language in a UK secondary school in your final year.

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