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Research Profile

Dr Neil Stephens 


    • Dr Neil Stephens is based at Cesagen Cardiff where he has completed two ESRC funded projects exploring the practice and regulation of human embryonic stem cell banking: 'Curating and Husbandry In the UK Stem Cell Bank' and the follow-up project 'The UK Stem Cell Bank: An Institutional Ecology'.
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    • He is currently involved in three main Cesagen research projects:

     

    • Cancer Biobanking in Practice: This project collects qualitative data on the establishment of cancer biobanks that hold patient’s tissue for distribution to cancer researchers. The project explores the role of agencies looking to produce best practice guidance and standardised - potentially universal - operating procedures for the technical, ethical and legal aspects of the work.

     

    • Seeing Stem Cells: Part of a £1.5m EPSRC grant with colleagues in the Cardiff Institute of Tissue Engineering and Repair (CITER) and Swansea University, this project examines the formation of interdisciplinary understanding and shared goals between stem cell scientists, engineers, and a range of other scientists who are jointly producing non-invasive imaging technologies for stem cells.
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    • In Vitro Meat in Context: This research documents the ways in which social, ethical and regulatory issues around stem cell science and tissue engineering are reframed when the targeted application of the research is moved from regenerative medicine to the production of food. By conducting interviews with scientists, entrepreneurs and advocates leading the field internationally the project analyses the challenges and opportunities In Vitro Meat technology poses for scientists, regulators and potential consumers. Supported by a Wellcome Trust grant.
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    • Before joining Cesagen Dr Stephens completed his PhD at the Centre for the Study of Knowledge, Expertise and Science (KES) with Prof. Harry Collins and Dr Rob Evans at Cardiff University School of Social Sciences. His thesis, 'Why Macroeconomic Orthodoxy Changes So Quickly: The Sociology of Scientific Knowledge and the Phillips Curve', explored the social construction of macroeconomic knowledge and the relationship to wider political influence.
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    • Dr Stephens also works with Dr Sara Delamont of Cardiff University School of Social Sciences on a project exploring the teaching of Capoeira, a Brazilian martial art/dance/game, in the UK.