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Dr Aditee Mitra

Dr Aditee Mitra

Research Fellow

School of Earth and Ocean Sciences

Email
mitraa2@cardiff.ac.uk
Telephone
+44 (0)29 2087 76828
Campuses
Room 1.37, Main Building, Park Place, Cardiff, CF10 3AT

I am a botanist by BSc (Presidency Kolkata), an ecologist by MSc (Warwick UK) and a systems dynamics modeller of plankton ecophysiology by PhD (SAMS/Open University UK) and research.

My background allows me to interface with a wide science base both research and teaching. I have a keen interest in working at the interface of science, governance and the public. Thus, I have been the Managing Editor for the Journal of Plankton Research (Oxford University Press), Climate Change Research Consultant (Welsh Local Government Association funded), Biodiversity Officer for Bridgend County Borough Council, a British Science Association Media Fellow with BBC Countryfile. I am also a Science Technology Engineering & Mathematics (STEM) Ambassador.

We are currently unable to retrieve the list of publications. Visit our institutional repository.

My research explores the interactions of food (prey) quality and quantity on consumer dynamics and thence on trophic dynamics (stoichiometric ecology) and biogeochemistry. Targets for this work are primarily planktonic and microbial systems, with recent emphasis upon mixotrophic plankton and variations in predation rates with prey size, abundance and nutritional quality. Applied aspects include optimisation of algal biomass production in the presence of zooplanktonic pests, and microbial activity in wetlands. The tools for research are primarily dynamic adaptive multi-nutrient (variable stoichiometry) models. I have been involved in various EU, RCUK and Welsh funded projects investigating a variety of issues ranging from sustainable use of water to the impact of human behaviour on the global oceans. 

More recently, in research, I have been a key driver of the new mixoplankton-centric paradigm in marine ecology that rewrites over 100 years of understanding of marine ecology by recognising the importance of microbial planktonic “Perfect Beasts” that contribute to ca. 50% of the oxygen we breath. I authored a Scientific American article on the Perfect Beast (March 2018). This was then selected for the Scientific American Revolutions in Science Special Issue (July 2018) as one of the “13 discoveries that could change everything”. This article has since been translated into French and German.

I currently lead the €2.88 H2020-MSCA-ITN MixITiN project which is training the next generation of marine researchers in the mixoplankton paradigm.