Professor Dianne Edwards MA, PhD, ScD(Cantab) CBE FRS FRSE FLS FLSW

Professor Dianne Edwards

MA, PhD, ScD(Cantab) CBE FRS FRSE FLS FLSW

Research Professor

School of Earth and Ocean Sciences

Email:
edwardsd2@cardiff.ac.uk
Telephone:
+44 (0)29 2087 4264
Location:
1.11, Main Building, Park Place, Cardiff, CF10 3AT

Interests

  • Mid-Palaeozoic Palaeobotany
  • Palaeoecosystems
  • Early embryophytes
  • Plant phylogeny
  • Phytoterrestrialisation

Academia

  • BA (Cantab)
  • Sc.D (Cantab)
  • Hon ScD (Dublin)

Affiliations

Professor Edwards is a Distinguished Research Professor at Cardiff University. She is also a Fellow of the Royal Society, Fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh, an honorary Fellow at the University of Wales, Swansea, a Corresponding Member of the Botanical Society of America.

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  • Edwards, D., Richardson, J. B. and Thomas, R. G. 1978. Locality B8, B9, B10. Presented at: International Symposium on the Devonian System (P.A.D.S. 78), Bristol, UK, September 1978 Presented at Friend, P. F. and Williams, B. P. J. eds.A field guide to selected outcrop areas of the Devonian of Scotland, the Welsh Borderland and South Wales: International Symposium on the Devonian System (P.A.D.S. 78), September 1978. Special Papers in Palaeontology, Vol. 23. London: The Palaeontological Association pp. 74-79.

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For the last 45 years, I have described Silurian- Devonian fossils that record the early history of plant life on land, particularly concentrating on their anatomy based on a wide variety of types of preservation. This aids in their identification and hence relationships, plus detection of adaptations, including biochemical ones, to the terrestrial environment and hence their palaeoecophysiology.  Of further major interest is the effects of early land vegetation on the lithosphere and atmosphere and this has led to colloboration with palaeozoologists and palynologists on ecosystem development  as well as chemists and neobotanists.