Professor Krishna Singh BSc Dunelm, PhD Open

Professor Krishna Singh

BSc Dunelm, PhD Open

Professor

School of Psychology

Email:
singhkd@cardiff.ac.uk
Telephone:
+44(0)29 2087 4690
Location:
Cardiff University Brain Research Imaging Centre, Maindy Road, Cardiff, CF24 4HQ

Research summary

My main research interest is in non-invasive functional imaging of the human brain using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and Magnetoencephalography (MEG). I have a specific focus on vision and the underlying neurophysiology of MEG and BOLD-fMRI signals. A recently developed interest has been the dependency of these measures on GABAergic inhibition.

Teaching summary

I am Module leader for one of the modules on our Neuroimaging MSc, PST512: “Introduction to Neuroimaging Methods. This is a course which is designed to give students insight into the principles behind modern non-invasive neuroimaging techniques. Topics covered include: The principles of MRI and structural imaging, DTI, fMRI, TMS, TDCS, neurophysiology, EEG and MEG.

Undergraduate education

1984 – 1987: Collingwood College, University of Durham. BSc in Physics (First Class Hons)

Postgraduate education

1987 – 1991: Department of Physics, The Open University, Milton Keynes. PhD in Physics.

Employment

2000 - 2005: Senior Lecturer, School of Life and Health Sciences, Aston University.

1998 - 2000: Lecturer. MARIARC, School of Medicine, Liverpool University.

1996 - 1998: Research Fellow. Psychology, Royal Holloway College, University of London.

1992 - 1996: Research Fellow. Department of Vision Sciences, Aston University, Birmingham.

1991 - 1992: Research Fellow. Department of Physics, The Open University, Milton Keynes.

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I am Module leader for one of the modules on our Neuorimaging MSc, PST512: “Introduction to Neuroimaging Methods. This is a course which is designed to give students insight into the principles behind modern non-invasive neuroimaging techniques. Topics covered include: The principles of MRI and structural imaging, DTI, fMRI, TMS, TDCS, neurophysiology, EEG and MEG.

Research topics and related papers

The main research areas I am currently involved in are:

The relationship between the BOLD response, as measured with fMRI, and oscillatory power changes in the cortex, as measured with MEG.

The role of GABAergic inhibition in determining oscillatory dynamics and performance on behavioural tasks.

The application of non-invasive neuroimaging to clinical conditions such as Epilepsy, Alzheimer’s, Schizophrenia and depression.

Functional Neuroimaging of visual motion processing in human visual cortex. This includes low-level visual tasks such as spatio-temporal frequency tuning, velocity tuning, contrast and motion coherency.

The functional significance and inter-relationship of Alpha, Beta and Gamma oscillations in human visual cortex.

Analysis and visualisation methods for the processing of MEG and fMRI data.

Funding

£971,676 from the MRC (2018-2020) Integrating genetic, clinical and phenotypic data to advance stratification, prediction and treatment in mental health. Hall, Owen, Harwood, John, Murphy, Walters, O’Donovan, Atack, Jones, Rice, Holmans, Collishaw, Moore, Singh, Thapar.

£6.7M from the MRC (2014-2016) Enhancing UK's Clinical Research Capabilities and Technologies 2014. Ultra-High Field MRI: Advancing Clinical Neuroscientific Research in Experimental Medicine. Wise, Jones, Singh, Linden, Kauppinen (Bristol), Graham.

£4.9M from the Wellcome Trust (2016-2021) Multi-Scale and Multi-Modal Assessment of Coupling in the Healthy and Diseased Brain. Jones, Assaf, Chambers, Graham, Jezzard (Oxford), Linden, Morris (Nottingham), Nutt (ICL), Sumner, Singh, Wise.

£2.9M from the EPSRC (2014-2019) National Facility for In Vivo MR Imaging of Human Tissue Microstructure. Jones, Alexander (UCL), Bowtell (Nottingham), Cercignani (Sussex), Dell’Acqua (KCL), Parker (Manchester), Singh, Wise, Miller (Oxford), Thomas.

£1.0M from the Wolfson Foundation (2014-2016) CUBRIC – The Cardiff University Brain Research Imaging Centre. Singh, Price, Jones, Wise, Linden, Graham, Chambers, Sumner.

£4.9M (FEC) (£654,159 to Cardiff) from the MRC. (2014-2019) MICA: STRATA - Schizophrenia: Treatment Resistance and Therapeutic Advances. Kapur, McCabe, Murray, McGuire, Howes, Rose, McCrone, Pickles, Talbot, Williams, Matthews, Deakins, Lewis, Emsley, Stone, Walters, Owen, Pocklington, Singh, Lawrie, McIntosh, Egerton, Doody, O’Neill, O’Donovan.

£44569 from the Wellcome Trust ISSF (2017-2018). Characterising alternations of neural dynamics in intractable epilepsy using neurophysiologically- informed models. Zhang, Singh, Hamandi, Cheng.

£99,998 from “Fight For Sight”, PhD Award (2016-2019), Changes in the visual cortex in glaucoma and their role in visual recovery: an fMRI-based study. Redmond (Optom) and Singh (Psych).

£38601 from the Wellcome Trust ISSF (2016-2016). Neurophysiologically- informed models and machine learning classification of task-driven and resting state oscillatory dynamics in schizophrenia. Singh, Walters, Freeman, Zhang. 

£44,206 from the Brain & Behavior Research Foundation (2015-2017) The impact of rare variants affecting gaba and glutamate gene sets in schizophrenia: An MEG study. Walters, Williams, Singh.

£307,019 from the Wellcome Trust. (2013-2016) Excitatory-inhibitory balance in adolescents at high genetic risk of mental disorder: A study of cortical gamma oscillations and GABA concentrations of 22q11.2 deletion syndrome. Doherty, Owen. Linden, Van den Bree, Singh.

£4.2M (FEC) (£925,580 to Singh as Cardiff PI) from the MRC. (2013-2018) Defining the disturbance in cortical glutamate and GABA function in psychosis, its origins and consequences. Deakin, Talbot, Gerhard, Hinz, Williams, Singh, Wilkinson, Walters, Freeman, Morris, Liddle, Brookes, Palaniyappan, Macdonald. 

£1.5M (FEC) from the MRC. (2013-2018). Building multi-site clinical research capacity in Magnetoencephalography (MEG). Singh (PI), Hamandi, Gross, Kessler, Brookes, Morris, Henson, Barnes, Woolrich, Nobre, Litvak, Holliday, Furlong, Shtyrov, Green

£986,846 (FEC) from the MRC. (2013-2016) Behavioural and neurophysiological effects of schizophrenia risk genes: a multi-locus, pathway-based approach. Linden, O’Donovan, Owen, Holmans, Pocklington, Zammit, Hall, Singh, Jones, Davey-Smith. 

£668,226 from the Wellcome Trust. (2013-2018). Dedicated Computing Infrastructure for CUBRIC. Jones, Singh, Wise.

£32,337 (£26,037 to Singh as Cardiff PI). (2013-2014) Advanced Brain Imaging in Childhood Epilepsy (ABICE) – Extension. Singh, Hamandi, Kirby, Koelewijn.

£15,000 from the NIAA, Understanding the mechanisms of sedation: Effects of GABAergic and non GABAergic sedatives (2013-2014). Saxena, Hall, Muthukumaraswamy, Wise, Singh

£99,980 from Epilepsy Research UK. Magnetoencephalographic measures of abnormal sensory oscillations: A new window on photosensitive epilepsy. (2010-2012). Hamandi, Singh and Muthukumaraswamy.

£195,000 from the Welsh Assembly Government (A4B): The Integrated Brain Imaging and Stimulation Project (IBIS). (2010-2013). Chambers, Singh, Wise, Jones and Jiles.

£165,000 from Bristol Research into Alzheimer’s and Care of   the Elderly: Characterizing the functional and anatomical integrity of visual attention-related processing in Alzheimer’s disease. (2010-2012). Tales, Singh, Bayer, Jones and O’Sullivan.

£113,039 from The Waterloo Foundation: Advanced Neuro-imaging in BECTS. (2010-2012). Hamandi, Singh et al.

£159,000 from the Wales Institute for Cognitive Neuroscience: 11 project awards from 2006-2009.

£4M from the Wellcome Trust: 4 yr PhD programme in integrative neuroscience. (2008-2014). Lead Applicants: Aggleton and Crunelli.

£426,191 from the Wellcome Trust: See it, grab it: Control of automatic sensorimotor behaviour in health and disease. (2009-2012)Sumner, Husain, Singh and Rafal.

£99,749 from EPSRC (EP/D039460/1) The development of MEG source reconstruction methods through models of human retinotopy. (2006-2008) Barnes, Hillebrand and Singh.

£400,000 from the Lord Dowding Fund for Humane Research: The Establishment of a functional imaging facility for humane research. (2004-2009) Furlong and Singh.

£789,096 from BBSRC (BBSB15562): Dynamics of Integrative Neural Processes Within the Human Visual Cortex. (2004-2009) Holliday, Green, Anderson, Barnes, Furlong, Hillebrand, Singh.

£176,933 from BBSRC (BBSB08035): Synthetic Aperture Magnetometry Studies of Stimulus Related Oscillatory Power Changes in Human Visual Cortex. (2004-2007). Singh.

£52,093 from the Wellcome Trust (#066975): The transformation of spatial information between visual areas in the human cerebral cortex. (2002-2003) Smith, Singh and Roberts.

£138,235 from the Wellcome Trust (#005653): An investigation of the visual areas of the human cerebral cortex. (1999-2002) Smith and Singh.

Postgraduate research interests

I am interested in supervising PhD projects in multi-modal functional neuroimaging methods and applications (MEG and fMRI), with a specific focus on vision and the underlying neurophysiology of MEG and BOLD-fMRI signals. A recent developing interest has been the dependency of these measures on GABAergic inhibition.

If you are interested in applying for a PhD, or for further information regarding my postgraduate research, please contact me directly (contact details available on the 'Overview' page), or submit a formal application here.

Current students

  1. Gemma Williams 2014-
  2. Joanne Doherty 2013-
  3. Diana Dima 2015-
  4. Rachael Stickland 2015-
  5. Phoebe Asquith 2015-
  6. Megan Godfrey 2016-
  7. Laura Bloomfield 2016-
  8. Melissa Wright 2016-
  9. Marie-Lucie Reed 2017-
  10. Tom Chambers 2017-

Past projects

Previous students

  1. Bethany Routley 2013-2017
  2. Lorenzo Magazzini 2013-2017
  3. Mark Mikkelsen 2012-2015
  4. Laura Knight (nee Whitlow) 2012-2015
  5. Jennifer Brealy 2011-2015
  6. Claire Hanley 2012-2015
  7. Alexander Shaw 2011-2015
  8. Panagiotis Kovanis 2010-2014
  9. Sian Robson (nee Griffiths) 2010-2013
  10. Benjamin Dunkley 2008-2011
  11. Ian Fawcett 2002-2005



External profiles