Ewch i’r prif gynnwys

Dr Claire Harris

Yr Ysgol Meddygaeth

Email
harriscl@cardiff.ac.uk
Campuses
Henry Wellcome Building
Comment
Sylwebydd y cyfryngau

Trosolwg

There are two primary research areas in my research group. The first is to interrogate structure/function relationships in the complement system at the biochemical level in order to further our understanding of the mechanisms underlying complement dysregulation and disease; and the second is to utilise the knowledge obtained to design improved and targeted therapies for diseases driven by complement.

I have developed novel techniques to understand how minor changes, such as common polymorphisms (genetic variations) in complement proteins, can affect function; these findings have opened the door to exciting new research in the field of complement in human disease.

Key techniques in the group include: surface plasmon resonance, protein purification (affinity and classical chromatography), immunoassay development, monoclonal antibody/hybridoma production, protein engineering and expression.

Aelodaethau proffesiynol

  • British Society of Immunology
  • Biochemical Society

Cyhoeddiadau

2018

2017

2016

2015

2014

2013

2012

2011

2010

2009

2008

2007

2005

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2003

2001

2000

My current research interrogates structure/function relationships in complement proteins to further understanding of the mechanisms underlying complement dysregulation and disease.

I have developed novel techniques to decipher how common polymorphisms in complement proteins affect function. With collaborators, I was the first to describe gain-of-function mutations in complement proteins which trigger renal disease (PNAS, 2007; JCI, 2010), and to define functional mechanisms behind common polymorphisms associated with age-related macular degeneration (AMD), and other diseases (PNAS 2009, HMG 2009, PNAS 2011).

I have described how the ‘complotype’ (the pattern of complement variants inherited by an individual) acts as a disease ‘hit’ with potential to predispose to chronic inflammatory disease or alter susceptibility to infection (Trends Immunol 2012). I am now applying these concepts to patient cohorts to understand relevance for patient care.

My interest in complement dysregulation includes mechanisms of dysregulation triggered by anti-complement autoantibodies; I am translating novel assays for these autoantibodies to the clinical immunology laboratory. I have a long-standing interest in design, engineering of anti-complement therapeutics and testing of these agents in animal models, a research theme which is strengthened by my focus on disease mechanisms.