Journalism, Communications and Politics

You will analyse and reflect upon changes to both politics and policy driven by the growth of social media, the communications industry and the 24/7 news cycle.

This joint honours degree is delivered in partnership by the School of Journalism, Media and Cultural Studies and the School of Law and Politics. It offers students the opportunity to explore the current debates in media studies and political science.

You will benefit from teaching led by experts in the fields of journalism and media studies on the one hand and political science and Government on the other. You will be taught by staff who are researchers or practitioners in the areas of journalism and communications or politics and international relations. Teaching and tuition will be informed by current and past research.

Both Schools offer a complementary range of postgraduate programmes for those wishing to continue their studies.

This degree offers an ideal opportunity to maximise your university experience with the highly regarded teaching, guest lectures, research and support of two of Cardiff University’s largest Schools.

Key facts

UCAS CodeJ323
Entry pointSeptember 2016
Duration3 years
Typical places availableThe School typically has 125 places available
Typical applications receivedThe School typically receives 600 applications
Typical A level offerABB, excluding General Studies and Critical Thinking
Typical Welsh Baccalaureate offerGrade A in the Core, Plus AB at A-Level.
Typical International Baccalaureate offer36 points
Other qualifications

Detailed alternative entry requirements are available for this course.
QAA subject benchmark
Admissions tutor(s)

Mrs Cerys Thomas, Course Administrator

Important Legal Information: The programme information currently being published in Course Finder is under review and may be subject to change. The final programme information is due to be published by May 2016 and will be the definitive programme outline which the University intends to offer. Applicants are advised to check the definitive programme information after the update, to ensure that the programme meets their needs.

The relations between the media and politics have become more prevalent in recent times; institutional politics have become more mediatised, and political leaders are now media-driven and speak in soundbites.

Political campaigning is not limited to pre-electoral periods any more and PR strategists and political consultants have become more and more central to politics. These links are affecting policy too, both at the national and the international levels.

The spread of the internet and the development of social media has also brought changes to the relations between citizens and their political representatives, and constitute a new platform for citizens’ political deliberation, and for the organisation of activists, protesters, and new social movements.

You will be introduced to key ideas, concepts and issues central to the study of journalism and the role of journalism in modern societies and also some of the main terms, theories and frameworks for understanding mass communications and popular culture.

Your modules will introduce you to the principal concepts used in the study of comparative government with a particular focus on the key institutions and practices of European parliamentary and democratic states and how political thought is studied.

Both the School of Journalism, Media and Cultural Studies and the School of Law and Politics offer a number of BA modules and seminars taught through the medium of Welsh. These modules will be made available to Welsh speaking students wishing to take them.

Year one

Year one includes six modules (120 credits). These provide the basis upon which the rest of the degree programme is built.

Module titleModule codeCredits
Media ScholarshipMC111520 credits
Introduction to European IntegrationPL919820 credits
Introduction to GlobalisationPL919720 credits
RepresentationsMC111420 credits
Introduction to Political SciencePL919420 credits

Year two

You will again study 120 credits. By the end of year two, you will be equipped to conceive, design, research and write up an optional dissertation in year three.

Listed are all modules available in year two from both schools. Please note these modules will be split between semester one and two.

Year three

A comprehensive range of modules are available in the third year with the option of a dissertation.  These modules will be split between semester one and two.

In year three the range of teaching methods will be more diverse and involve assignments of greater complexity and challenge. You will conduct independent research and apply theoretical ideas and approaches to practical and/or analytical work.

The University is committed to providing a wide range of module options where possible, but please be aware that whilst every effort is made to offer choice this may be limited in certain circumstances. This is due to the fact that some modules have limited numbers of places available, which are allocated on a first-come, first-served basis, while others have minimum student numbers required before they will run, to ensure that an appropriate quality of education can be delivered; some modules require students to have already taken particular subjects, and others are core or required on the programme you are taking. Modules may also be limited due to timetable clashes, and although the University works to minimise disruption to choice, we advise you to seek advice from the relevant School on the module choices available.

The modules in Year One are taught mainly using a lecture/seminar format, whereby students are introduced to ideas and approaches in the lectures and then carry out more applied and team-based work in seminars. Ideas are thereby introduced in the lectures, and then tested, discussed and applied in the seminars. Students will have to choose one module every term, enabling them to tailor their education to their own interests from day one.

Year Two will, like Year One, be taught mainly using a lecture/seminar format, although the tasks developed in seminars will be more ambitious. By the end of Year Two, students will be equipped to conceive, design, research and write up a dissertation in year three.

In addition to the dissertation (which can be carried out in the either School), Year Three requires students to follow 40 credits in each School during the year, allowing students to specialise in their areas of interest. While a number of these will be based on a lecture/seminar format, the range of teaching methods will be more diverse and involve assignments of greater complexity and challenge. Students will conduct independent research and apply theoretical ideas and approaches to practical and/or analytical work.

In 2013/14, 96% of the School of Journalism. Media and Cultural Studies' graduates who were available for work reported they were in employment and/or further study within six months of graduation.

In 2013/14, 96% of the School of Law and Politics' graduates who were available for work reported they were in employment and/or further study within six months of graduation.

Duration

3 Year(s)

Next intake

September 2016

Places available

Typical places available

Applications received

Typical applications received

Accreditations

QAA subject benchmark

QAA subject benchmark

Overview and aims of this course/programme

What should I know about year five?

How is this course/programme structured?

What should I know about year four?

What should I know about year three?

What should I know about the preliminary year?

What should I know about year one?

Assessment:


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Other information

Distinctive features

How will I be taught?

Admissions tutors

Mrs Cerys Thomas, Course Administrator


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