Julie Latchem-Hastings

Julie Latchem-Hastings

Research Associate

School of Journalism, Media and Cultural Studies

Dr Julie Latchem-Hastings works as a Research Associate for the Coma and Disorders of Consciousness Research Centre.  Her research, both past and present focusses on the care and rehabilitation of people with neurological conditions, and the well-being of those who care for them.

Her research to date focusses particularly on the care and rehabilitation of people with neurological conditions residing in long-term care settings in the independent sector.  Working with the Cardiff-York coma and disorders of consciousness research centre she has also conducted a range of studies in the area of severe brain injury, focussing in particularly on family and allied health care professional relations. 

Julie is currently working on the production of a multimedia resource about prolonged disorders of consciousness, to support student and qualified allied health professional learning about this patient group and their communication with families.

Most recent publications:

Latchem, J (2016) Troubling researcher-led recruitment: the self-selection of brain injured adults who lack capacity to consent. York Policy Review 3 pp. 1-11

http://yorkpolicyreview.co.uk/journalsite/volume-three/troubling-researcher-led-recruitment-the-self-selection-of-brain-injured-adults-who-lack-capacity-to-consent/

Latchem, J., Kitzinger, J. and Kitzinger, C. (2016) Physiotherapy for vegetative and minimally conscious state patients: family perceptions and experiences. Disability & Rehabilitation 38(1) pp. 22-29

Dr Julie Latchem-Hastings is a neurological physiotherapist by background.  She held multiple clinical and managerial roles in the NHS and Independent sector, managing multidisciplinary teams in neurological rehabilitation, long term care and general and old age medicine.

Julie left clinical practice in 2012 to pursue postgraduate study.   She completed an MSc in Social Research Methods at Cardiff University and secured ESRC +3 funding to undertake her PhD.  Using a temporal lens, Julie’s doctoral research examines how the futures of people with severe brain injury are shaped during their rehabilitation. 

Her research, both past and present focusses on the care and rehabilitation of people with neurological conditions, and the well-being of those who care for them. Working with the Coma and Disorders of Consciousness Research Centre she has conducted a range of studies in the area of severe brain injury, focussing in particularly on family and allied health care professional relations. 

You can learn more about Julie in a recent interview in Physiotherapy Frontline:

http://www.csp.org.uk/frontline/article/3-minutes-julie-latchem-hastings-following-golden-thread

Professional memberships

Critical Physiotherapy Network (2015-)

British Sociological Association (2014-)

Future Matters Collective, Cardiff University (2013-)

Medicine, Science and Culture research group, Cardiff University (2013-)

Cardiff-York Coma and Disorders of Consciousness Research Centre (2012-)

Association of Chartered Physiotherapists Interested in Neurology (2007-)

Chartered Society of Physiotherapy (2005-)

Speaking engagements

  • Hastings, G. and Latchem, J. (2017 21 April) Co-producing multimedia learning resources through interprofessional education: the PDoC way.  Making the case for practice education - The National Association for Educators in Practice, Birmingham, UK.
  • Latchem, J. (2017 4-5 April) Allied Health professionals experiences of treatment withdrawal.  International perspectives on end of life decision making. Cardiff-York Coma and Disorders of Consciousness Research Centre. Green Templeton College, Oxford, UK.
  • Latchem, J. Kitzinger, J. Kell, C and Boniface G. (2016 11-12 November) Developing a multimedia learning resource for Allied Health Professionals: exploring challenges of prolonged disorders of consciousness. European Physiotherapy Congress (ER-WCPT) Liverpool, UK.
  • Latchem, J. (2016 14 September) Brain Injured futures: the triad of patient, family and health care professional relations. Future Matters Collective International Crwdd, Cardiff University, UK
  • Latchem, J.  (2015) Caring relations at the margins of neurological care home life: The rehabilitative work of ‘hotel service’ staff. BSA MedSoc Annual Conference, York, UK.
  • Latchem, J. (2015) Caring relations at the margins of neurological care home life: The rehabilitative work of ‘hotel service’ staff. Seeing is believing: the unseen and unknown of brain injuries. York University, UK [Invited speaker].Future Matters Collective (2014 11-12 September) Promise through the lens of time – Pursuing Futures multidisciplinary, multimedia performance.  Futures in question, Goldsmiths, University of London, UK
  • Latchem, J. (2014 12-13 June) Physiotherapy for people in disorders of consciousness – family’s perceptions.  Challenging the Limits: Recent advances in the assessment, diagnosis and MDT management of people with disorders of consciousness, Holy Cross Hospital, UK.
  • Latchem, J. (2014 9 May) Allied Health professionals experiences of treatment withdrawal.  Withholding and withdrawing treatment from patients in a vegetative or minimally conscious state.  Joint COPPA and CDoC conference, York University, UK [Invited speaker]
  • Latchem, J. (2013 11-12 October) Lay perceptions of physiotherapy in neurological rehabilitation and long-term care.  Physiotherapy UK, Birmingham, UK.  [Invited speaker].
  • Latchem, J. (2013 16 May) Shared Reading and Dementia: Research and Practice.  The Reader Organisation Conference, London, UK. [Invited panellist].
  • Latchem, J. and Kitzinger, J. (2012 2-5 July) Using focus groups to capture what is important in neurological long term care. ESRC Research Methods festival, Oxford, UK. [Invited speakers].

Committees and reviewing

  • Journal reviewer, Sociology of Health and Illness
  • Journal reviewer, BMI Online

Current teaching

Julie is currently teaching part of a new inter-professional final year module in the School of Healthcare Sciences, developed as part of the Improving allied health professional communication and practice project.  Julie guest lectures annually on the MSc Neurophysiotherapy programme.

Curricula development and delivery

Following her own independent research and research of the Coma and Disorders of Consciousness research centre along with Professor Jenny Kitzinger, Julie developed 6 hours of new pre-registration interprofessional teaching.  This teaching was picked up by the School of Health care sciences and delivered by Julie, Professor Jenny Kitzinger and Dr Geraldine Latchem-Hastings to pre-registration Physiotherapists, Occupational Therapists, Operating Department Practitioners, Therapeutic and Diagnostic Radiographers, at Cardiff University School of Health Care Sciences (2016 – 2017).  The materials are now being developed into an online multimedia resource to enable a flipped classroom for interprofessional teaching in 2018.

Previous Invited guest lecturing/teaching 

  • Making a difference from the start: early career research impact and engagement –RCBC Wales, University of Wales (June 2016) [Doctoral and Postdoctoral]
  • The body in long-term neurological care: research, practice and management. Body, Health and Medicine, Cardiff University (2013). [undergraduate]
  • Prolonged disorders of consciousness: family perceptions and experiences. MSc Neurorehabilitation, Cardiff University (2015;2016;2017) [M level]
  • Full day methods workshop: MSc Social Science Research Methods – systematic literature reviews, Cardiff University (2015) [M level]

Research Overview

Julie's research has a single golden thread - the care and rehabilitation of people with neurological conditions and those who care for and about them.  Working with the Cardiff-York coma and disorders of consciousness research centre she has conducted a range of studies in the area of severe brain injury, focussing in particularly on family and allied health care professional relations. 

Julie’s doctoral research examines how the futures of people with severe brain injury are shaped during their rehabilitation.  She highlights how the futures of different types of brain injured patient are constructed, compressed and negated and examines the role of the temporal in the relationships between patient, families and health care staff – notably how patients’ futures are imagined differently by these three groups.  

Julie’s PhD identifies highlights the role of non-qualified staff in the care of people with severe injury and how their ‘care of the present’ helps shapes the future of those with profound impairment.  She aims to use her doctoral research to highlight the importance of those in non-professional roles within rehabilitation settings and care homes, to support patient, family and health care professional relations in these settings and to challenge the reality status of the temporal construction of rehabilitation as ‘future orientated.’ 

Current projects

Working within the School of Journalism, Media and Cultural Studies and with the Cardiff-York Coma and Disorders of Consciousness Research centre, Julie is currently working on project:

Improving allied health professional communication and practice: using research findings about family experiences of vegetative & minimally conscious states to create change.

Building on research exploring the experiences of allied health professionals and families with relatives in a prolonged disorder of consciousness, Julie is developing curricula materials for pre-registration allied health students and a multimedia resource for health professionals, students and families.  The teaching materials and resource explore the clinical, social, legal and ethical issues in the care of people in prolonged disorders of consciousness.  (ESRC Impact Accelerator Award)

Recently completed projects

Christian perspectives on death and dying

Julie was the co-ordinator of this ecumenical initiative supporting Christians to engage with contemporary debates on death and dying.  Her main roles within this project included the organisation of six conference events in England in Wales, the curation of complimentary collaborative art-research exhibitions and the production of a connected toolkit.  The toolkit is a multimedia resource containing educational materials and support for Christians to hold discussions/events around the key issues explored through the project – providing/withholding treatment, advance decisions and assisted dying. (Paristamen CIO)

The resource is free - go to www.christiandying.org.uk

Funding successes

2016 – The Paristamen CIO – co-applicant – Christian Perspectives on death and dying - £20,000

2015 – ESRC Impact accelerator grant – co-applicant – Improving allied health professional communication and practice: using research findings about family experiences of vegetative & minimally conscious states to create change £25,000

2014 – Wales Doctoral Training Centre Small Collaboration award - £750

2013 – Wales Doctoral Training Centre Impact and engagement funds - £300

2013-2016 ESRC PhD Studentship (open award)

2012 – Liverpool Reviews and Implementation Group, Liverpool University Capacity Building funds - £5000

Research Interests

  • Neurological rehabilitation and long-term care in the independent sector.  
  • Health professional/family relations in the care of people with neurological conditions, in-particularly, those in a Prolonged Disorder of consciousness 
  • Futures in health care, and the role of ‘time’ in the experience of illness and health care relations
  • Arts and health
  • Ethnography 
  • Participatory and creative methodologies to support the involvement of people with neurological conditions in research