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Dr Mariah Lelos

Dr Mariah Lelos

Senior Lecturer

School of Biosciences

Email:
lelosmj@cardiff.ac.uk
Telephone:
+44 (0)29 2087 5541
Location:
Sir Martin Evans Building, Museum Avenue, Cardiff, CF10 3AX
Available for postgraduate supervision

My lab focuses on understanding and treating neurodegenerative diseases, particularly Parkinson’s and Huntington’s diseases. We are interested in understanding the manifestation of motor and non-motor (cognitive, neuropsychiatric) dysfunctions in degenerative diseases using lesion, viral vector and genetically modified rodent models. We are also investigating the ability of novel cell (hESC- and hiPSC-derived) and gene therapies to alleviate these impairments and optimising these treatments for clinical application.

My PhD (2005-2010, Prof M Good) investigated neural network dysfunction using mathematical modelling in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease, with a particular focus on amyloid-induced amydala and hippocampal dysfunction.

My post-doctoral research (2010-2015, Prof S Dunnett) aimed to understand basal ganglia dysfunction in Parkinson's and Huntington's disease and to explore the use of human fetal and novel stem cell derived therapies to alleviate the behavioural impairments.

I was then awarded a Senior Research Fellowship from Parkinson's UK (2015-2018) to investigate the ability of human stem cell derived cell therapy products to ameliorate cognitive impairments in rodent models of Parkinson's disease.

I have recently commenced a Senior Lectureship in the neuroscience department and my lab is exploring several new avenues. We are seeking to understand the mechanisms of neural dysfunction using novel DREADDs manipulations, undertaking PET/MR imaging and using newly created models of disease. We are also studying the impact of novel cell therapy approaches and newly optimised gene therapies on cellular and behavioural function.

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My lab focuses on understanding and treating neurodegenerative diseases, particularly Parkinson’s and Huntington’s diseases. We are interested in understanding the manifestation of motor and non-motor (cognitive, neuropsychiatric) dysfunctions in degenerative diseases using lesion, viral vector and genetically modified rodent models. We are also investigating the ability of novel cell (hESC- and hiPSC-derived) and gene therapies to alleviate these impairments and optimising these treatments for clinical application.

I am keen to welcome new PhD students to the team with a particular interest in:

Parkinson's disease

Huntington's disease

Cognitive or neuropsychiatric dysfunctions

Cell therapies

Gene therapies