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Dr Keiko Kokeyama

Dr Keiko Kokeyama

Lecturer
Gravity Exploration Institute

Users
Available for postgraduate supervision

Overview

I am an experimental physicist in gravitational-wave detector science. Since the monumental first detection of gravitational waves from a binary black hole merger in 2015, followed by a neutron star merger in 2017, it has been a golden age of gravitational-wave astrophysics. The gravitational wave detectors are laser interferometers to detect distortions of space-time caused by gravitational waves, coming from somewhere in the universe. Because the distortions of space-time are extremely small, typically an order of 10^(-21) m (0.000...21 zeros... 001 m, one-millionth of a proton diameter), the gravitational-wave detectors are extremely sensitive, as precise as Heisenberg’s uncertainty limit allows. I worked on the two large-scale detectors, LIGO Livingston detector and KAGRA detector to make the detector work and improve the sensitivity to run the astrophysical observations. Because the instruments must be very sensitive, many state-of-the-art technologies are being developed and implemented. Currently, at Cardiff, I work on new technologies to make future detectors more sensitive. We want to observe more numbers of black hole or neutron star mergers from even the father universe.

Biography

Professional memberships

  • KAGRA Scientific Congress Board
  • LIGO Scientific Collaboration
  • KAGRA Collaboration

Academic positions

  • 2021-Present: Lecturer, Cardiff University, UK.
  • 2017-2021: Assistant Professor, Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, The University of Tokyo, Japan
  • 2015-2017: Project Assistant Professor, Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, The University of Tokyo, Japan
  • 2011-2015: Postdoctoral researcher, Louisiana State University, US.
  • 2009-2011: Postdoctoral researcher, University of Birmingham, UK.

Publications

2022

2021

2020

2019

2018

2016

2015

2014

2013

2012

2011

2010

2009

2008

2007

2006

Teaching

Join my gravitational-wave classes and projects!

2021-22, 2022-23

  • Experimental Gravitational-Wave Physics II (PXT902)
  • Experimental Physics (PXT1150)
  • Physics Project (PXT3315 and 3350)
  • Msc Physics Project (PXT999)

2021-22

  • Experimental Gravitational-Wave Physics II (PXT902)

My research interests fall within the field of detector science for gravitational wave astrophysics.

  • Laser source at a wavelength of 2 um for the next generation of gravitational wave detectors
  • Better tilt sensor for the interferometer mirrors
  • New type of phase camera to measure optics birefringence

Supervision

Past projects

External profiles