Skip to main content
Dr Christopher Hood

Dr Christopher Hood

Reader in Japanese Studies

School of Modern Languages

Email
hoodcp@cardiff.ac.uk
Telephone
+44 (0)29 2087 4515
Campuses
2.07, 66a Park Place, Cathays, Cardiff, CF10 3AS
Comment
Media commentator
Users
Available for postgraduate supervision

Overview

My research revolves around a number of issues. The one thing that connects them all, to date, is Japan.

The second aspect that features in much of my research is memorialisation, symbolism and identity. This was a part of my research on the education reforms embarked on by Prime Minister Nakasone. After that, it has been a feature of my research on the shinkansen and also about the flight JL123 crash.

Consequently, the third feature of much of my research has been about public transportation in Japan.

For further details please see the following page Christopher P. Hood (wordpress.com)

Biography

I am an academic and author based at Cardiff University. My research interests primarily relate to Japan and fall into two areas. First, I am particularly interested in themes relating to memorialisation, identity and symbolism. Second, I am interested in issues relating to the railways and aviation in Japan.

Having become interested in Japan while I was at Concord College, I went on to study Japanese Studies and Business Studies at the School of East Asian Studies (University of Sheffield). Then, after a year on the JET Programme, I returned to Sheffield to do a PhD. Since 2000 I have been at Cardiff University, where I am a Reader in Japanese Studies. From 1999 to 2009 I was also an Associate Fellow at Chatham House. I am a member of the British Association for Japanese Studies, and have served as its President since 2016.

I am the author of five academic books; Education Reform in Japan: Nakasone’s LegacyShinkansen: From Bullet Train to Symbol of Modern JapanDealing With Disaster in Japan: Responses to the Flight JL123 CrashOsutaka: A Chronicle of Loss in the World’s Largest Single Plane Crash, and Japan: The Basics. I have edited two other titles; Doing Business with the Japanese (co-editor with Prof G. Bownas and D. Powers) and the 4 volume The Politics of Modern Japan. I have also written three novels, Hijacking Japan, Tokyo 20/20 Vision and FOUR.

Click here for more information about my researchhere for details about selected research publicationshere for a list of publicationshere for a list of presentations that I have given, and here for information about photographs in my research.

Honours and awards

In 2016 I received a Certificate of Commendation from the Ambassador of Japan in the UK in recognition of distinguished service to contributing to the deepening of mutual understanding and friendship between Japan and UK.

Professional memberships

  • Association for the Study of Death and Society (ASDS) 
  • British Association for Japanese Studies (BAJS) 
  • European Association for Japanese Studies (EAJS) 
  • Japan Anthropology Workshop (JAWS) (2006- )
  • The Japan Society 
  • Japanese Railway Society 
  • JET Alumni Association 
  • UK-Japan 21st Century Group

Publications

2021

2020

2018

2017

2014

2013

2011

2010

2009

2008

2007

2006

2005

2004

2003

2002

Teaching

I believe in both research-led teaching and teaching-led research, and aim to improve students' understanding of Japan and to develop key skills such as presentation skills and inter-cultural communication.

The modules I particularly contribute to are

  • Japanese Culture and Society
  • Memory and Symbols in Japan
  • Dissertation (Japanese Studies)
  • Intermediate Japanese

I also contribute to some of the MA course on Culture, Creativity and Globalization.

My research revolves around a number of issues. The one thing that connects them all, to date, is Japan.

The second aspect that features in much of my research is memorialisation, symbolism and identity. This was a part of my research on the education reforms embarked on by Prime Minister Nakasone. After that, it has been a feature of my research on the shinkansen and also about the flight JL123 crash.

Consequently, the third feature of much of my research has been about public transportation in Japan.

Recently I have continued to do research about the JL123 crash, looking specifically at why one of the memorials was modified 30 years after the crash and how this may fit with a model, that I developed, to explain modifications to public transportation accidents. I have also been studying the nature of Japanese disaster narratives (particularly movies), how the JL123 ones fit with the typical style and comparing these also to Hollywood disaster narratives.

Another aspect of my research has been looking at the symbolic side of the ‘wrapping’ of the shinkansen and planes in Japan. This is something that I discussed in my book on the shinkansen, but developed further in Japan: The Basics and then a chapter in a book about ‘contents tourism’ in Japan (also see my posts about Contents Tourism, by clicking here).

To discover more about my research, please search through my site to look at the various pages I have written and also the posts. The posts can be easily found by checking the Research-Related posts category or searching for particular tags or keywords. For example, you can find posts about my research on JL123 here, and about the shinkansen here, those on symbolism here, and those on identity here.

For additional information see Details about my Research – Christopher P. Hood (wordpress.com)

You can also find a list of my publications here and a list of my presentations here.

Supervision

I am available for supervising PhD students, covering a range of topics related to Japan in particular. I am currently co-supervising two PhD students - one looking at the digitalization of witness testimonies at memorial museums in Japan, the other looking at fan-subbers in Saudi Arabia.

Past projects

I was co-supervisor for Christopher Hayes on the topic of 'Contradictory Stereotypical Depictions of Japan’s Relationship with Technology in the British Press'