Medicine with a preliminary year (MBBCh)

Designed for students who have demonstrated high academic potential but have been unable to meet the subject specific requirements for entry on to the five year medical programme.

Medic talking to patients

Cardiff School of Medicine is long-established, well-resourced and has an international reputation for teaching and research activities. We are one of the largest medical schools in the UK, rated among the top 10 medical schools in the UK and the top 100 world-wide (1) and among the top five most rapidly improving medical schools in the UK(2).

The 'Medicine with a Preliminary Year' programme has been designed for students who have demonstrated high academic potential but have been unable to meet the subject specific requirements for entry on to the five year medical programme.

As a Cardiff student you will have opportunities that aren't available at all medical schools. We combine the strengths of a Russell Group medical school with the flexibility and cutting edge approach of the most modern institutions around the globe, offering you:

  • a portfolio of courses and a range of opportunities to study medicine
  • a cutting-edge curriculum based on evidence gathered from across the world
  • teaching from internationally-renowned researchers and clinicians
  • excellent teaching facilities
  • the whole of Wales as your classroom, meaning you get a breadth of clinical experience ranging from small, rural GP practices and small cottage hospitals to fast-paced city A&E departments and complex surgical specialties
  • a smooth transfer into the first year of your career as a doctor

Key facts

UCAS CodeA104
Entry pointSeptember 2016
Duration6 years
Studying in WelshThis course offers elements that are taught through the medium of Welsh. Please contact the Admissions tutor for more information.
AccreditationsGeneral Medical Council (GMC)
Typical places availableThe School typically has approx 300 places available.
Typical applications receivedThe School typically receives approx 3500 applications.
Typical A level offerStudents should offer three A2 Levels with AAA grades. This Foundation Year is for those students who do not have the depth of subject specialism associated with A100. It is not intended for applicants who have taken but failed to achieve the necessary grades in subjects required for entry into the A100 Programme. The typical offer will be AAA grades at A2 level.
Typical Welsh Baccalaureate offerGrade A in the Core plus grade A in two A-level subjects. This Foundation Year is for those students who do not have the depth of subject specialism associated with A100. It is not intended for applicants who have taken but failed to achieve the necessary grades in subjects required for entry into the A100 Programme.
Typical International Baccalaureate offerFor specific requirements, please contact the medical admissions team.
Other qualificationsAll applicants should sit the UKCAT examination prior to applying. For more details, please see the information under Admissions Tests.

Detailed alternative entry requirements are available for this course.
QAA subject benchmark

Medicine and GMC ‘Tomorrow’s Doctors 2009

Admissions tutor(s)

Miss Emma Walker, Course Administrator

Professor Aled Phillips, Admissions Tutor

Important Legal Information: The programme information currently being published in Course Finder is under review and may be subject to change. The final programme information is due to be published in July 2016 and will be the definitive programme outline which the University intends to offer. Applicants are advised to check the definitive programme information after the update, to ensure that the programme meets their needs.

Our curriculum blends basic medical sciences, pathological sciences and clinical experiences. It is delivered using a variety of teaching methods, including small-group tutorials, lectures and practical laboratory-based sessions. Clinical skills are learned initially in clinical skills sessions, using models and simulators, before being put into practice on clinical placements.

In order to produce the best doctors, we believe that patients must be the focus of a medical degree. Throughout your course you will therefore spend time with patients in clinical settings in order to provide context to what you are learning. As you progress, your exposure to patients increases along with the complexity of your clinical cases and your responsibilities for patients' care.

Clinical placement teaching takes place at hospitals, community medical centres and over 150 general practices across the whole of Wales, meaning we can offer you a uniquely diverse clinical learning experience. Your skills and professional behaviours are developed throughout the curriculum so that when you graduate you are fully prepared for your Foundation Programme and postgraduate medical training.

Wales is a great place to study Medicine, for so many reasons. The course combines early, hands-on clinical learning, with innovative teaching from leaders in their field. These are renowned academics and talented clinicians who are passionate about medical education and, in my experience, always happy to help. We get to see patients early on and experiencing medicine in different communities across Wales helps a lot when it’s time to choose our future specialties.

Amy Butlin, Medical Student

Preliminary year

During the preliminary year, you will study twelve modules alongside students from a variety of other science disciplines. The combination of modules you'll study will depend on your prior qualifications but normally includes modules on biological and chemical sciences, mathematics and a range of optional modules in other subjects such as psychology and languages.

Provided you satisfactorily complete the Preliminary year, you will progress onto year one of the five year MBBCh programme.

Year one

Introduction to Science and Health

At the start of year one, we'll introduces you to the core knowledge, skills and behaviour expected of a doctor, to prepare you for the challenging and exciting programme of study ahead.

  • Your Introduction will run for the first 12 weeks, covering the basics of anatomy, biochemistry, physiology, cell and molecular biology, immunology, microbiology and pathology
  • You will also develop the fundamental communication, clinical skills and professionalism required of a doctor
  • This is supported by short clinical experience days, in hospitals and GP practices around Cardiff.

Clinical scenarios

The remainder of years one and two is based on a series of clinical scenarios linking the basic sciences to common clinical conditions such as heart disease, diabetes, hypertension and obesity

  • You will learn to address medical problems from first principles and develop your scientific reasoning skills
  • Small group sessions will be supported by lectures and seminars, access to life science and clinical skills resources, a Doctoring programme focusing on Professionalism, Ethics and Personal Development, and patient contact,  all linked to the cases you are working on
  • To give you real experience of such cases, you will spend one day a week seeing patients with similar conditions in local hospitals, general practices and other community based services around South East Wales
  • Initially you will concentrate on normal structure and function but, as the cases progress, you will move on to more complex clinical presentations which focus on abnormal structure and function
  • Whilst on placement you will be working alongside other healthcare professionals and you will benefit from a range of inter-professional learning opportunities
  • Teaching will be based at our state-of-the-art facilities in the Cochrane building (our flagship £18m development on the site of University Hospital of Wales, Cardiff) and at the School of Biosciences as well as rotating through regional Clinical Teaching & Learning centres in Merthyr Tydfil, Bridgend, and Newport.

Year two

Clinical scenarios

The remainder of years one and two is based on a series of clinical scenarios linking the basic sciences to common clinical conditions such as heart disease, diabetes, hypertension and obesity

  • You will learn to address medical problems from first principles and develop your scientific reasoning skills
  • Small group sessions will be supported by lectures and seminars, access to life science and clinical skills resources, a Doctoring programme focusing on Professionalism, Ethics and Personal Development, and patient contact, all linked to the cases you are working on
  • To give you real experience of such cases, you will spend one day a week seeing patients with similar conditions in local hospitals, general practices and other community based services around South East Wales
  • Initially you will concentrate on normal structure and function but, as the cases progress, you will move on to more complex clinical presentations which focus on abnormal structure and function
  • Whilst on placement you will be working alongside other healthcare professionals and you will benefit from a range of inter-professional  learning opportunities
  • Teaching will be based at our state-of-the-art facilities in the Cochrane building (our flagship £18m development on the site of University Hospital of Wales, Cardiff) and at the School of Biosciences as well as rotating through regional Clinical Teaching & Learning centres in Merthyr Tydfil, Bridgend, and Newport.

Year three

During years three and four you will spend most of your time on clinical placements as you learn medicine by following patients through the healthcare system.

  • Each year has three 8-10 week placements, in South East Wales in year three and across Wales in year four, offering you a variety of clinical learning experiences and exposure to life as a front line doctor
  • You'll get broader experience of the healthcare system in your 3rd year by following patient 'pathways' through your placements, looking closely at what happens to people as they go through the 'Hospital Front Door', as Oncology patients dealing with malignant disease, and when they are suffering from Chronic Diseases such as diabetes and ischaemic heart disease
  • In your 4th year your time will be concentrated on increasingly specialist and complex cases. You'll continue to focus on Chronic Disease but also explore the specific medical needs of Children, Women and the Family, and of Clinical Neuroscience and Psychological Medicine patients
  • Working as part of a clinical team, you will undertake your share of the on-call duties, learn the essentials of excellent clinical care, become proficient at clinical assessment and come to understand the investigation, management and treatment of common disease
  • Between placements you'll learn the fundamentals of good medical practice and the science needed as a competent medic, as well as having expert teaching on pathology, therapeutics, social sciences and ethics
  • In year three you will have opportunities for multiple short projects or a single longitudinal study, while in year four a 'Science in Practice' block will give you exposure to leading University and NHS experts and researchers.

Year four

During years three and four you will spend most of your time on clinical placements as you learn medicine by following patients through the healthcare system.

  • Each year has three 8-10 week placements, in South East Wales in year  three and across Wales in year four, offering you a variety of clinical learning experiences and exposure to life as a front line doctor
  • You'll get broader experience of the healthcare system in your 3rd year by following patient 'pathways' through your placements, looking closely at what happens to people as they go through the 'Hospital Front Door', as Oncology patients dealing with malignant disease, and when they are suffering from Chronic Diseases such as diabetes and ischaemic heart disease
  • In your 4th year your time will be concentrated on increasingly specialist and complex cases. You'll continue to focus on Chronic Disease but also explore the specific medical needs of Children, Women and the Family, and of Clinical Neuroscience and Psychological Medicine patients
  • Working as part of a clinical team, you will undertake your share of the on-call duties, learn the essentials of excellent clinical care, become proficient at clinical assessment and come to understand the investigation, management and treatment of common disease
  • Between placements you'll learn the fundamentals of good medical practice and the science needed as a competent medic, as well as having expert teaching on pathology, therapeutics, social sciences and ethics
  • In year 3 you will have opportunities for multiple short projects or a single longitudinal study, while in year 4 a 'Science in Practice' block will give you exposure to leading University and NHS experts and researchers.

Year five

Our unique Harmonisation Programme brings together all of the elements of your course and blends existing knowledge and skills with those required by the Foundation Programme in order to better prepare you for life after graduation.

  • Your integration within clinical teams and responsibility for patient care will increase through this final year of study, which focuses on preparing you for your role as a doctor so that you are in the best possible position to start work within the NHS and ready for your postgraduate studies
  • This year you will focus on the assessment and management of acute and chronic clinical presentations, with increasing responsibility throughout the year
  • There will be two 8-week clinical placements, one hospital based and the other community (general practice) based, where you will be expected to contribute to patient care under supervision
  • Learning will be predominantly based in the workplace, with sessions in the simulation centre and small group sessions designed to refine your clinical thinking and decision-making
  • These placements will be followed by an 8-10 week student elective at a destination of your choice, anywhere in the world, in order to study aspects of medicine that capture your imagination
  • You will also have four 2-week core learning blocks that will address important aspects of a medical career. These Cardiff-based activities, themed "Preparing for Practice", "Changing Practice", "Science in Practice" and "Practise for Practice," will provide you with a better understanding of what to expect when you start work, including team-working, leadership, service improvement, academic research skills, and life as a Foundation doctor
  • The Harmonisation Programme will culminate in the senior student assistantship, allowing you to really work as part of the clinical team by directly managing patients under the supervision of the hospital teams. This will take place in the hospital where you will undertake your first Foundation (F1) job, if it is in Wales. If your F1 job is to be elsewhere, you can choose either to arrange a senior student assistantship at that hospital yourself or else to have us organise your senior student assistantship for you in Wales
  • The final year will ensure that you are ready for your career in medicine, consolidating the skills and knowledge required to perform at the highest level within the NHS.
The University is committed to providing a wide range of module options where possible, but please be aware that whilst every effort is made to offer choice this may be limited in certain circumstances. This is due to the fact that some modules have limited numbers of places available, which are allocated on a first-come, first-served basis, while others have minimum student numbers required before they will run, to ensure that an appropriate quality of education can be delivered; some modules require students to have already taken particular subjects, and others are core or required on the programme you are taking. Modules may also be limited due to timetable clashes, and although the University works to minimise disruption to choice, we advise you to seek advice from the relevant School on the module choices available.

The School of Medicine provides an educational experience based on academic excellence, rooted in world-leading research and scholarship.  The curriculum has been developed using evidence-based best practice in order to provide you with the best possible learning experience.

Learning

The Medical programme is a modern integrated curriculum providing you with a unique diversity of learning experience. Teaching is delivered in partnership with the Schools of Biosciences, Psychology and Social Science and clinical placement teaching takes place in more than 200 hospitals and General Practices, across the whole of Wales.

The programme uses a blend of teaching methods with small group teaching and case based  learning being used extensively throughout. This learning is supported and reinforced by a coordinated programme of lectures, seminars, practicals, lab and clinical skills sessions, and relevant clinical experience.

Central to the course is a programme of self-directed learning, providing you with the opportunity to take more responsibility for your own learning and to tailor the programme to fit with your own interests. As the programme progresses, you will be expected to take increasing responsibility for your own learning, preparing you for a life-time of continued personal development.

Assessment

Our programme of assessment is designed to be appropriate, fair, valid, reliable and supports student learning. All of the assessment methods we use are evidence-based and employ a broad range of methodologies in recognition of students' diverse academic strengths and different approaches to learning. For example, Single Best Answer questions are used extensively for testing knowledge and Objective Structured Clinical Examinations (OSCEs) for testing clinical skills.

Wherever possible, clinical examinations are enhanced by the use of real patients with clinical problems. The School is also using Workplace Based Assessment approaches for assessing clinical skills, such as portfolios and clinical logbooks to demonstrate reflective learning and professionalism.

At the heart of our assessment programme is the principle of "Frequent review and rapid remediation, and the use of formative assessment, allowing you to use assessment as a learning tool, and to help us to identify those students who are beginning to struggle academically so that appropriate support can be put in place.

In 2012, 100% of the School's graduates had secured employment or engaged in further study within six months of graduation.

Jobs

  • General Practitioner
  • Registrar
  • Genetic Counsellor
  • Dermatologist

Duration

6 Year(s)

Next intake

September 2016

Places available

Typical places available

Applications received

Typical applications received

Accreditations

QAA subject benchmark

QAA subject benchmark

Medicine and GMC ‘Tomorrow’s Doctors 2009

Overview and aims of this course/programme

The primary purpose of the medicine programme is to prepare graduates for working life as a Foundation Doctor in the NHS and their career beyond.  The 5-year MBBCH programme is structured so that there is progressive acquisition of knowledge, clinical skills and professional attitudes within an integrated spiral curriculum.  The programme initially focuses on preparing you for learning in higher education and building a platform for integrated clinical sciences.  This is achieved through the acquisition of theoretical knowledge, delivered in the classroom, practical classes, lectures and the virtual learning environment.  You will then learn to apply your knowledge in the clinical environment both in hospital and community settings.  The programme emphasises the importance of learning science in the clinical context and the central place of the patient in the work of a doctor.  Patient safety, science knowledge, scholarship, and the service role of doctors are unifying themes throughout the programme.  As you progress through the programme you will find there is increasing emphasis on the acquisition of clinical skills, initially in a simulated environment progressing to extended clinical placements with increasing responsibility in hospital and community settings throughout Wales.  Throughout the programme you must display the professional attributes expected of doctors in training.

This 6-year programme includes a Preliminary Year (Year 0) before Year 1 of the specific MBBCH programme. The Preliminary Year is designed for students who do not have the full scientific background required for direct entry into Year 1 of the medical programme. The Preliminary Year provides an opportunity for students, including mature students and those with qualifications in other disciplines, to gain background knowledge in the biosciences, chemistry and mathematics. Preliminary Year modules are delivered through lectures, tutorials, and practical classes, with supporting information available through the virtual learning environment. Coursework is used to develop written and oral communication skills. Students who satisfactorily complete the Preliminary Year and achieve module marks that meet the progression criteria may then progress into Year 1 of the MBBCH programme.

By the time you graduate you will have demonstrated that you make the care of patients your first concern, are able to apply your knowledge and skills in a competent and ethical manner and use your ability to provide leadership and to analyse complex and uncertain situations.  You will have achieved all the outcomes and clinical competencies required by the General Medical Council set out in ‘Tomorrow’s Doctors 2009’.

The Medicine programme is recognised as a Primary Medical Qualification under the Medical Act, and graduates of the programme may apply for provisional registration with the General Medical Council.

What should I know about year five?

Students are expected to attend all scheduled teaching, including small group sessions and tutorials, lectures, timetabled laboratory sessions and all-clinical learning opportunities, throughout the course.

All absence should be reported in accordance with the procedures approved by the Undergraduate Board of Studies.

Full expectations of students are outlined in the Student Charter.

As a medical student you are expected to demonstrate professional behaviour, appropriate to that of a doctor in training, at all times from the start of the course.  The General Medical Council set out the standards for all doctors (including those in training) in “Good Medical Practice” (http://www.gmc-uk.org/guidance/good_medical_practice.asp) and for students in “Medical students: professional values and fitness to practise” (http://www.gmc-uk.org/education/undergraduate/professional_behaviour.asp). 

You must comply with the health screening processes for medical students to ensure you do not pose a risk to patients, this includes completion of Occupational Health screening processes, vaccination programmes, and following recommended treatments – detailed information can be found in the GMC publication “Medical students: professional values and fitness to practise” referred to above.

All medical students are required to have membership of a recognised medical protection organisation for the duration of their medical studies.

How is this course/programme structured?

The primary mode of delivery in years 1 and 2 of the programme will be via case based learning where learners are supported in small groups by a trained facilitator. You will learn basic and clinical science via the theme of the ‘Chronological Life Course’.  Each unit of study will consist of a series of patient cases (typically each case will last approximately 2 weeks).  Your learning will be linked to these cases to ensure you have the opportunity to meet the learning outcomes for each unit of study.  The clinical scenarios (cases) will form the vehicle by which you will learn the biomedical (basic sciences) related to common clinical conditions that affect patients of different ages. The psychological and social science principles will also be studied as they apply to clinical practice.  Setting learning in the context of patient scenarios will allow you to explore in context, the wider determinants of health, population health and the methods required to improve health and healthcare.

You will participate in seminars and tutorials, work in small groups, carry out laboratory work, attend a small number of lectures and direct your own learning supported by our virtual learning environment and learning resource centres.  You will develop and practise your clinical skills in a simulated environment before putting these into practice during clinical placements in hospital and community settings. In years 1 and 2 you will spend a day most weeks in a clinical environment of a hospital or community setting, where you will meet patients who have some of the clinical problems you have been learning about. 

In years 3 and 4 you will be expected to apply and build upon your earlier learning and this will be by increased clinical time in hospitals and GP surgeries, throughout Wales. Your learning will be centred around the patient experience as you will follow patients along the care pathway from community settings into hospital care and back into the community on placements.  Whilst on placement you will be practising the clinical skills, previously done in a simulated setting, in real life clinical settings. You will have an educational supervisor who will monitor your progress, review patient cases seen and provide feedback.  Clinical placement learning will be complemented with further periods of instruction back in Cardiff, where you will revisit core scientific principles and build upon these, but with an increased emphasis on the patho-physiology, diagnostic methods, management and treatment of common diseases. As you progress through the phase the level of complexity of the cases, the skills required and the application of knowledge will increase.

By the time you reach year 5 you will be ready to take a more active role within clinical teams.  The emphasis during year 5 is on consolidation of the knowledge and skills acquired earlier in the programme in order to prepare you for working as a doctor in the NHS so that there is a smooth transition from student to Foundation Doctor.

Throughout your learning you should demonstrate the professional behaviours expected of doctors in training and you will be supervised by Educational Supervisors in the NHS with Honorary University appointments. 

The core learning is supplemented by a series of “Student selected components” in all years of the programme, allowing you to choose projects from a list of available options, or to develop your own project.  In the final year you will have an opportunity to go on an ‘elective’ and visit medical settings anywhere in the UK or internationally. These ‘options’ enable you to pursue an aspect of medicine of particular interest to you. 

What should I know about year four?

Any specific equipment, such as a stethoscope will be provided at the start of the course by the School of Medicine.

What should I know about year three?

Throughout the programme you will develop discipline specific and generic ‘employability’ skills, these include:

  • Scientific method and approaches to research
  • Analysis and interpretation of quantitative and qualitative data
  • Communication skills – written and oral
  • Numeracy
  • IT skills
  • Verbal presentation skills
  • Problem solving
  • Clinical history and examination skills
  • Diagnosis and management of clinical presentations
  • Carrying out practical procedures safely and effectively
  • Emergency medical care
  • Prescribing
  • Leadership and management skills
  • Teaching skills

What should I know about the preliminary year?

In years 1 and 2 of the programme you will be taught by a small number of lectures, practical sessions in the anatomy centre and other laboratories, small group tutorials and case based learning groups. Case based learning is a structured and supported method of learning. A clinical case forms the basis of study, and you will learn the relevant anatomy, physiology, biochemistry, social sciences and therapeutics for example. This method of learning in the clinical context will make it easier to recall the knowledge. You will learn practical clinical skills, such as communication, examination and practical procedural skills in clinical skills centres. Communication skills are taught by using actors who are trained to behave as patients. This is a safe environment for you to learn how to gather information, explain diseases and treatment. The workshops continue through the course and the scenarios become more complex and challenging.

In years 3 and 4 you will spend most of your time in clinical environments such as out patient clinics, wards and GP surgeries. You will be taught by hospital doctors, General Practitioners, and clinical skills tutors. You will learn by talking to and examining patients, which you will then discuss with clinicians. You will be taught in the clinical situation, in small group tutorials, using the clinical skills centres, simulation suites and by some lectures.

By the final year of the course most of the time will be spent in clinical situations, with only a few weeks of teaching based in Cardiff, to cover areas such as NHS management and organisation, the principles of service improvement and to revisit key areas of science that are relevant to clinical practice.

Throughout the course your teachers will include scientists, active researchers and clinicians. Some of the staff are members of Cardiff University, but many of the clinicians who are NHS staff have honorary appointments with the university. You will therefore benefit from the experience and enthusiasm of those who are looking after patients daily or from researchers who are at the cutting edge of clinical advances. 

What should I know about year one?

Assessment:

Assessment throughout the programme will be based on an ethos of frequent look and rapid remediation.  You will complete a balance of formative ( ie tests to help you know whether you are making progress) and summative assessments ( ie tests that have to be passed, in order to be able to move on to next phase).

Achievement of the programme outcomes will be assessed using a variety of methods which include:

In course assessments; short written reports and oral presentations

Knowledge examinations are usually in the format of ‘single best answers’ (SBAs). These assessments will occur three times a year from year 2 and you will need to demonstrate progression and increasing levels of knowledge and understanding.

As medicine is a vocational programme you will be assessed on your acquisition of clinical skills of communication, clinical examination and assessment and practical procedures. These will be done in the clinical environment where feedback can be given and then in a formalised examination, using actors and patients. These assessments (OSCE- objective structured clinical examinations) will occur at several points in the course.

Throughout the programme your professionalism will be assessed using portfolios which encourage you to reflect on your experiences, assessments that use feedback from your colleagues and clinicians when on clinical placements.

You must demonstrate the outcomes defined by the General Medical Council in ‘Tomorrow’s Doctors 2009’.  Reasonable adjustments will be made, where appropriate, to enable you to achieve these outcomes, but the outcomes themselves will not be adjusted.

Feedback:

You will receive oral feedback on your performance in oral presentations and in the clinical environment on clinical skills and professionalism.  Written feedback will be provided on written reports / projects.

Feedback on SBA papers is provided to each student, to demonstrate which questions you answered correctly and with specific learning points for questions answered incorrectly.   

Performance in clinical examinations (OSCE) will be demonstrated by providing you with the  marks for the station, together with results for overall performance of the cohort and individual comments from the examiner about ‘ what was done well’ and what can be done to improve’.  

In the event of failing an exam students will be able to meet with an academic member of staff for further feedback, advice and support.

All students should discuss their academic progress with their academic mentor at least once a year. 

Other information

The whole programme makes extensive use of Cardiff University’s Virtual Learning Environment (VLE), Learning Central, on which you will find course materials, links to related materials, and e-learning materials. 

You will have a named academic mentor, for help and support with academic needs, who will schedule regular meetings to discuss progress, provide advice and guidance. You should take the opportunity to reflect on your abilities and performance through developing a personal development plan. 

You have access to further support for personal issues through a personal mentor scheme and in some special circumstances may require additional support through the Student Support Unit, who may make specialist onward referrals, especially for health issues, communications skills and particular academic support.

Distinctive features

Graduates from this programme will be able to:

Demonstrate all of the outcomes for medical graduates as defined by the GMC in Tomorrow’s Doctors 2009. These include:

·         Take responsibility for the care, diagnosis, management and treatment of patients.

·         Place patients’ needs and safety at the centre of the care process

·         Show respect for their patients at all times.

·         Take responsibility for their own practice and actions.

·         Display the capacity for inquiry and be prepared to continue learning, teaching, doing evaluation and research throughout their careers.

·         Develop their existing knowledge, deepen understanding and improve performance through experiential learning.

·         Adapt effectively in response to uncertainty and change

·         Combine directed, self-directed and simulated learning

·         Display a sound appreciation of ethical, legal and community issues.

·         Relate the scientific basis of medicine, including its most recent developments to the diagnosis and treatment of disease.

·         Extrapolate the importance of physical, psychological and social determinates of health to medical practice;

·         Act as an effective member of multidisciplinary teams.

·         Practice effectively as a Foundation Programme doctor in the NHS.

How will I be taught?

Cardiff University offers a number of intercalated degree opportunities in health related disciplines, eg pharmacology, public health and epidemiology, neurosciences, genetics and psychological medicine, for medical students. There are also agreements with other Higher Education Institutes within Wales for medical students to gain a bachelor degree in one year in subjects such as sports science. This intercalated degree provides those students with an interest in a research or academic career to pursue an area of medicine in depth and to further develop their research skills should they wish.

During the penultimate year of the programme (year 4) a number of students with language skills will have the opportunity to apply to participate in the ERASMUS exchange scheme.  The School of Medicine has established exchange links with other medical schools in France, Spain, Portugal and Italy so that you are able to study some clinical disciplines abroad for 12 weeks.

In addition during the final year all students will complete an Elective, which is an opportunity to do a project in a medical setting of your choosing anywhere in the world (subject to Foreign Office travel advice).

Admissions tutors

Miss Emma Walker, Course Administrator

Professor Aled Phillips, Admissions Tutor


Key Information Sets (KIS) make it easy for prospective students to compare information about full or part time undergraduate courses, and are available on the Unistats website.

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