History with Welsh History (BA)

The dynamic and contested history of modern Wales is a particular area of teaching strength at Cardiff University.

The BA History with Welsh History at Cardiff University offers a unique opportunity to specialise in aspects of Wales's past alongside the study of wider themes and periods. It allows you to place Wales in context, but also to reflect upon Wales's contributions to broader historical developments.

The History department has internationally-renowned specialists offering courses in areas such as Welsh migration in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, the inter-war Depression and the impact of socialist thought. Another area of expertise is early modern Wales, where the subjects covered include the nature of Welsh identity in a period of political and religious upheaval and the nature of crime and punishment.

In studying the BA History with Welsh History you will, above all, learn to 'do history' yourself, and will thus acquire the sorts of skills that employers prize. You will learn to think independently, assess the strengths and weaknesses of a body of historical evidence for yourself, and present your findings clearly. Our friendly academic staff will be on hand to guide you and provide full and constructive feedback throughout your studies.

Distinctive features

This degree allows you to develop your own research agenda for exploring Welsh history and historical writing through independent study in the second and third years. 

Key facts

UCAS CodeV1V2
Next intakeSeptember 2017
Duration3 years
ModeFull time
Studying in WelshUp to 28% of this course is available through the medium of Welsh. Please contact the Admissions tutor for more information
Typical places availableThe School of History, Archaeology and Religion typically has 320 places available.
Typical applications receivedThe School of History, Archaeology and Religion typically receives 1800 applications.
Admissions tutor(s)

Entry requirements

For detailed entry requirements see the School of History, Archaeology & Religion admissions criteria pages.

Typical A level offerAAB-ABB, including History. General Studies and Critical Thinking are not accepted.  
Typical Welsh Baccalaureate offerAAB-ABB from the Welsh Baccalaureate and two A-level subjects, to include History.
Typical International Baccalaureate offer33 points from the International Baccalaureate, to include 6 points in Higher Level History.
Other qualificationsApplications from those offering alternative qualifications are welcome.

BA History with Welsh History is a three year degree programme. You will study modules totalling 120 credits each year.  

Our year-long courses are the product of rigorous design and continuous re-evaluation. Academics staff, students and outside experts work together to ensure that degree schemes meet quality standards in their disciplines.

You may choose to specialise in History with Welsh History from the beginning of your first year, or you may choose to combine the study of history with a subject taken from elsewhere in the College of Arts, Humanities and Social Science.

The modules shown are an example of the typical curriculum and will be reviewed prior to the 2017/18 academic year. The final modules will be published by July 2017.

Year one

You will study 120 credits in Year One.

All first-year History students take ‘History in Practice’ which introduces you to the different frameworks that underpin historical research and the many different ways of writing history, while providing training in the skills necessary to practice history at undergraduate level.

You can choose to study modules outside of the School of History, Archaeology and Religion. These can be chosen from modules from participating Academic Schools.

 

Module titleModule codeCredits
Modern WalesHS110420 credits
Early Modern England and Wales 1500-1700HS110620 credits
History in Practice: Fury, Folly and FootnotesHS110720 credits
Module titleModule codeCredits
Module titleModule codeCredits
Medieval EuropeHS110120 credits
The Making of The Modern World, 1750-1970HS110520 credits
Making Global Histories: Asia and the WestHS110820 credits

Year two

In years two and three, the emphasis shifts further towards seminar work, with individual supervision for extended essays and dissertations.

The core course comprises weekly lectures supplemented by fortnightly seminars in small groups. The Independent Study module has no lectures or seminars but is taught through individual supervisions with academic staff.

Module titleModule codeCredits
Approaches To HistoryHS170130 credits
Exploring Historical DebateHS170230 credits

Year three

In year three you will study the compulsory dissertation module, taught through individual supervisions with an academic adviser. Your dissertation will be based on original sources about a Welsh subject.

You will also take three optional modules and may, if you wish, choose to specialise in terms of period, approach or geographical area.

Module titleModule codeCredits
DissertationHS180130 credits
Module titleModule codeCredits
Module titleModule codeCredits
The World of the Anglo-Saxons, c.500-c.1087HS180330 credits
The Military Orders 1100-1320HS180530 credits
Slavery and SinHS181830 credits
Crime in England and Wales, c.1570-c.1790HS182330 credits
Witchcraft and Witch-Hunting in Early Modern Europe, 1400-1750HS182430 credits
Cultures of Power: The Gentry of Tudor and Stuart EnglandHS182730 credits
Deviants, Rebels and Witches in Early Modern Britain and IrelandHS182830 credits
From Bismarck To Goebbels: Biography and Modern German History, 1870-1945HS182930 credits
Germany's New Order in Europe 1933-1945HS183230 credits
Conflict, Coercion and Mass Mobilisation in Republican China 1911-1945HS183830 credits
Men in Black: The Jesuits in the Early Modern WorldHS184430 credits
Glimpses of the Unfamiliar: Travellers to Japan from 1860 to the Post-War EraHS185830 credits
Socialism, Society and Politics in Britain 1880-1918HS186030 credits
Llafur, Sosialaeth a Chymru, 1880-1979HS186230 credits
Culture, Soc & I.D. in Wales 1847-1914HS186530 credits
Class, Protest and Politics: South Wales 1918-39HS186830 credits
Violence and Ideology in Inter-War Soviet RussiaHS188330 credits
Czechoslovakia: The View from Central EuropeHS188430 credits
Europe and the Revolutionary Tradition in the Long Nineteenth CenturyHS188730 credits
Slavery and Slave Life in North America, 1619-1865HS189030 credits
Gender, Power and Subjectivity in Twentieth-Century BritainHS189430 credits
The Arts in War and Peace: Culture and Politics in Britain, c.1930-1960HS189730 credits
Nineteenth-century British Social HistoryHS189830 credits
The University is committed to providing a wide range of module options where possible, but please be aware that whilst every effort is made to offer choice this may be limited in certain circumstances. This is due to the fact that some modules have limited numbers of places available, which are allocated on a first-come, first-served basis, while others have minimum student numbers required before they will run, to ensure that an appropriate quality of education can be delivered; some modules require students to have already taken particular subjects, and others are core or required on the programme you are taking. Modules may also be limited due to timetable clashes, and although the University works to minimise disruption to choice, we advise you to seek advice from the relevant School on the module choices available.

How will I be taught?

The School of History, Archaeology and Religion enables you to develop in a high-quality learning environment, supported by a student-orientated approach to the acquisition of knowledge and skills.

Teaching methods include lectures, seminars, practicals, field trips, and one-to-one tutorials. You will also undertake independent study and research, with guidance from tutors.

Lectures provide an overview of the key concepts and frameworks for a topic, equipping you to carry out independent research for the seminars and to develop your own ideas.  Seminars provide an opportunity for you to explore the ideas outlined in the lecture in a small group environment.

Seminars usually consist of about 15 students and the seminar leader (a member of the teaching team). Seminars may take various formats, including plenary group discussion, small group work and student-led presentations. They offer a rewarding opportunity to engage critically with the key ideas and reading of a topic, and to explore areas of particular interest with an expert in the field.

Welsh language teaching

The department provides significant opportunities for learning and teaching through the medium of Welsh. Subject to staff availability, seminar teaching in Welsh is available on some or all of the major core courses, and at least one Welsh language option is offered in years two and three. Welsh language supervision is also available for long essays (Exploring Historical Debate) and dissertations, and students may elect to write all or some of their assessed work and examinations in Welsh.

How will I be supported?

As well as having regular feedback from your personal tutor in each course, you will have a reading week each semester for guided study and a chance to catch up on assessed work, reading and revision. 

You will have access through the Learning Central website to relevant multimedia material, presentations, lecture handouts, bibliographies, further links, electronic exercises and discussion circles.

The University offers a range of services including the Careers Service, the Counselling Service, the Disability and Dyslexia Service, the Student Support Service, and excellent libraries and resource centres.

Feedback

You will receive feedback through formative written work, seminar discussion, written feedback on essays, essay tutorials, and Dissertation and Exploring Historical Debate supervision sessions (which include oral and written feedback on bibliographies, research plans, and draft chapters).

How will I be assessed?

Modules are assessed by various methods, including coursework essays, written reports, source criticisms, critical reviews, examinations, class tests and oral presentations.

Coursework and examinations are used not only for assessment purposes but also as a means of developing your capacities to gather, organise, evaluate and deploy relevant information and ideas from a variety of sources in reasoned arguments.  Assessment, including coursework, exams, and oral presentations, will test the different skills you have learned. 

Progression is built into assessment, in that you will do smaller guided tasks in Year One, as well as formative essays in Years Two and Three. Progression is also evident in the growing emphasis on lengthier, independent work culminating in a 10,000-word dissertation in Year Three.  Final Year modules also demand deeper engagement with independent methods of working, together with greater demands on handling critically a larger number of bibliographical tasks and items.

What skills will I practise and develop?

This degree develops develop a range of important intellectual skills, including critical thinking, evaluating evidence, constructing arguments based on evidence, and presenting opinions effectively in writing and in debate. You will also gain valuable practical skills for example, team-working, independent research and time management.

The acquisition of skills and of intellectual understanding generally is progressive. As you progress through your degree we will raise our expectations of the depth and breadth of your studies. In broad terms:

  • Year One introduces you to a variety and range of approaches used in history.
  • Year Two provides you with specific training in the critical analysis of concepts, theories and methods used by historians.
  • Final Year provides you with the opportunity to develop these skills through a systematic engagement with, and interrogation of primary sources in your modules and in the production of a Dissertation based on original research.

You are encouraged to take increasing responsibility for your own learning and for the presentation of your findings. We cannot learn for you, but it is our responsibility to help you learn through a combination of lectures, seminars, workshops and tutorials, and to help you become independent learners. By the end of the degree, you will have acquired a thorough grounding in what the great historian Marc Bloch once famously described as ‘the historian’s craft’.

In 2013/14, 92% of the School’s graduates who were available for work reported they were in employment and/or further study within six months of graduation.

We organise interactive workshops with the Careers Service to help students identify their skills and attributes. History graduates find work in a wide range of related and non-related professional employment. Some choose to undertake postgraduate study at Cardiff or elsewhere, and some have become internationally reputed historians.

Jobs

  • Historian
  • Teacher
  • Lecturer
  • Academic Researcher

Tuition fees

UK and EU students (2017/18)

Please see our fee amounts page for the latest information.

Students from outside the EU (2017/18)

Please see our fee amounts page for the latest information.

Will I need any specific equipment to study this course/programme?

You will not need any specific equipment.

The school has a dedicated Work Placements Officer who supports students with work experience opportunities both in and out of term time.


Key Information Sets (KIS) make it easy for prospective students to compare information about full or part time undergraduate courses, and are available on the Unistats website.