Ancient History and Spanish (BA)

Within this degree scheme students will have the option to pair a rapidly growing international language with traditional academic study of ancient civilization.

The BA in Ancient History and Spanish (Joint Honours) gives students the opportunity to combine learning a major world language with the study of the ancient Greek and Roman world. With in-depth study of both Ancient History and Spanish, graduates will develop the tools to compete in an increasingly global workforce.

The BA in Ancient History and Spanish aims to develop your knowledge and critical understanding of the political, social, economic, and cultural structures of other societies, and to cultivate intellectual skills such as the ability to assess evidence critically, to evaluate different interpretations of the evidence, to construct arguments on the basis of evidence, and to express opinions cogently in speech and in writing.

Paired with study abroad in Spain, students will have first-hand experience of using vital language skills alongside their historical academic studies – leading to important (and employable) skills acquisition.

In Spanish, you develop high-level language skills with the aim of achieving near-native competency along with in-depth knowledge of aspects of the culture, history, politics and society of Spain and other Spanish-speaking countries. The course will enable you to develop your writing skills through a range of exercises including resumes and essays with your oral and aural skills being practised through a varied pool of audio-video material, websites, films and computer programmes.

It is important to remember that studying languages is not just about the language itself. It involves examining many aspects of a country and its culture, its social structures and institutions, politics, history, literature and cinema. Through the study of such areas you are able to gain a better understanding of Spanish culture and of how Spain has evolved over the centuries, becoming what it is today.

Ancient History covers the period from the Aegean Bronze Age to the fall of the Roman Empire in the west and its survival in the east as the Byzantine Empire. There is a balance between modules covering specific historical periods and thematic modules that examine broad social and cultural topics, such as warfare, gender, religion, art, medicine and science.

The degree provides the training necessary for students who wish to study Ancient History or Spanish at postgraduate level, and a valuable range of intellectual and transferable skills for students who enter other professions.

Students spend their third year in Spain or a Spanish speaking country, practicing and developing their language skills.

Key facts

UCAS CodeRV4C
Entry pointSeptember 2016
Duration4 years
Typical places availableThe School of History, Archaeology and Religion typically has 320 places available.
Typical applications receivedThe School of History, Archaeology and Religion typically receives 1800 applications.
Typical A level offerABB. Three A-level subjects to include a B in a modern foreign language for beginners, or B in Spanish for the advanced pathway. General Studies is excluded. Two AS subjects may be considered in lieu of a third A-level.
Typical Welsh Baccalaureate offerGrade A in the Core and grades AB at GCE A-level, to include grade B in a Language subject.
Typical International Baccalaureate offer30-32 points to include 5 points in Spanish at Higher Level.
Other qualificationsApplications from those offering alternative qualifications are welcome.

Detailed alternative entry requirements are available for this course.
QAA subject benchmark

Linguistics

Classics and Ancient History

 

Admissions tutor(s)

Dr Louis Rawlings, Admissions Tutor

Important Legal Information: The programme information currently being published in Course Finder is under review and may be subject to change. The final programme information is due to be published by May 2016 and will be the definitive programme outline which the University intends to offer. Applicants are advised to check the definitive programme information after the update, to ensure that the programme meets their needs.

Year one

Students of this course study 60 modules from Ancient History and 60 modules from Spanish.

Year two

Students studying this course may take one or two modules from another Academic School, selected from the University’s Free Standing Module Collection.

Module titleModule codeCredits
Reading Latin 2HS332220 credits
Reading Greek 2HS332420 credits
Latin Historical TextsHS334310 credits
Latin Historical TextsHS334410 credits
Greek Historical TextsHS334610 credits
Reading Latin 1HS342120 credits
Reading Greek IHS342320 credits
Independent 2nd Year StudyHS433420 credits
Spanish Language Year 2 (Ex-Advanced)ML029920 credits
Spanish Language Year 2 (Ex-Beginners)ML029820 credits
Introduction to Catalan Culture and LanguageML029420 credits
Principles of Translation TheoryML229920 credits
Innovations in European LiteratureML129820 credits
Pots, Poems and Pictures: Using Evidence for Ancient HistoryHS433620 credits
Greek Historical TextsHS334510 credits
Business Spanish IML028720 credits
Landmark Films from Spain and Latin AmericaML029120 credits
Miguel de Cervantes, Don QuijoteML029620 credits
At the Roots of European CulturesML129520 credits
Introduction to Specialised Translation (Spanish)ML229720 credits
Inscriptions and Athenian HistoryHS332610 credits
Gods & the Polis: Athenian FestivalsHS333010 credits
Roman ReligionHS333110 credits
Greek and Roman MedicineHS337620 credits
Life in Ancient RomeHS435810 credits
Houses in Roman ItalyHS436310 credits
Introduction to Spatial Techniques and TechnologiesHS241810 credits
Geographic Information Systems for Archaeologists and Ancient HistoriansHS241910 credits
Aegean Bronze Age: Emergence To CollapseHS238720 credits
Art & Archaeology of Classical GreeceHS238920 credits
Heritage CommunicationHS242820 credits
Roman Imperial History 31BC - AD138HS331730 credits
The Later Roman Empire AD284 - 602HS331830 credits
Tyrants, Kings and Democrats: the Rise of Classical GreeceHS337420 credits
King and Court in the Ancient Near EastHS337720 credits
Death and Burial in the Roman WorldHS430820 credits
Greek WarfareHS436620 credits

Year three: Sandwich year

You spend your third year studying abroad.

Year four

In Year 4, you choose a further 60 credits of Ancient History and 60 credits of Spanish, including a core module in Spanish language. If you wish, you can write a dissertation on a topic of your choice in either Ancient History or Spanish.

Module titleModule codeCredits
Spanish Language (BA Languages)ML038220 credits

Module titleModule codeCredits
Reading Latin 2HS332220 credits
Reading Greek 2HS332420 credits
Latin Historical TextsHS334310 credits
Latin Historical TextsHS334410 credits
Greek Historical TextsHS334610 credits
Reading Latin 1HS342120 credits
Reading Greek IHS342320 credits
Greek Historical TextsHS334510 credits
Researching the Ancient World: Final Year DissertationHS433540 credits
Politics and Society in SpainML038020 credits
May 68. Marking Changes in European Politics and CultureML139920 credits
Catalan Language and Society (Prereq EU0294)ML038120 credits
Student Language AmbassadorML139820 credits
Spanish for professional purposesML038320 credits
Translation as a ProfessionML239320 credits
Advanced Translation Practice (Spanish)ML038620 credits
Pots, Poems and Pictures: Using Evidence for Ancient HistoryHS433620 credits
Dissertation Joint Honours - in SpanishML038920 credits
European Cinema: thinking the real of fictionML230220 credits
Dissertation (Translation)ML238920 credits
Women's Voices in Contemporary SpainML039720 credits
Dissertation Joint Honours - in EnglishML039620 credits
Inscriptions and Athenian HistoryHS332610 credits
Gods & the Polis: Athenian FestivalsHS333010 credits
Roman ReligionHS333110 credits
Greek and Roman MedicineHS337620 credits
Life in Ancient RomeHS435810 credits
Houses in Roman ItalyHS436310 credits
Introduction to Spatial Techniques and TechnologiesHS241810 credits
Geographic Information Systems for Archaeologists and Ancient HistoriansHS241910 credits
Aegean Bronze Age: Emergence To CollapseHS238720 credits
Art & Archaeology of Classical GreeceHS238920 credits
Heritage CommunicationHS242820 credits
Roman Imperial History 31BC - AD138HS331730 credits
The Later Roman Empire AD284 - 602HS331830 credits
Tyrants, Kings and Democrats: the Rise of Classical GreeceHS337420 credits
King and Court in the Ancient Near EastHS337720 credits
Death and Burial in the Roman WorldHS430820 credits
Greek WarfareHS436620 credits
European Cinema DissertationML230320 credits
The University is committed to providing a wide range of module options where possible, but please be aware that whilst every effort is made to offer choice this may be limited in certain circumstances. This is due to the fact that some modules have limited numbers of places available, which are allocated on a first-come, first-served basis, while others have minimum student numbers required before they will run, to ensure that an appropriate quality of education can be delivered; some modules require students to have already taken particular subjects, and others are core or required on the programme you are taking. Modules may also be limited due to timetable clashes, and although the University works to minimise disruption to choice, we advise you to seek advice from the relevant School on the module choices available.

School of History, Archaeology and Religion
The School of History, Archaeology and Religion enables you to develop in a high-quality learning environment, supported by a student-orientated approach to the acquisition of knowledge and skills.
You will develop a range of intellectual skills: critical thinking, evaluating evidence, constructing evidence-based arguments, and presenting opinions effectively in writing and in debate. Additionally, you will gain practical skills such as team-working, independent research, and time management. Teaching methods include lectures, seminars, practicals, field trips, and one-to-one tutorials. You will also undertake independent study and research, with guidance from tutors. Assessment, including coursework, exams, practical work, and oral presentations, will test the different skills you have learned.

School of Modern Languages
Lectures provide an overview of the key concepts and frameworks for a topic, equipping students to carry out independent research for the seminars and to develop their own ideas.

Seminars provide an opportunity for students to explore the ideas outlined in the lecture in a small group environment. Seminars would usually consist of about 15 students and the seminar leader (a member of the teaching team). Seminars may take various formats, including plenary group discussion, small group work and student-led presentations. Seminars offer a rewarding opportunity to engage critically with the key ideas and reading of a topic, and to explore areas of particular interest with an expert in the field. It is vital that students prepare for seminars (undertaking any set reading, developing independent critical thought) in order to gain the maximum benefit from the sessions.

Lectures and seminars enable students to develop communication and analytical skills, and to develop critical thinking in a supportive environment.

Essays and examinations are used not only for assessment purposes but also as a means of developing students’ capacities to gather, organise, evaluate and deploy relevant information and ideas from a variety of sources in reasoned arguments. Dedicated essay workshops and individual advice enables students to produce their best work, and written feedback on essays feeds forward into future work, enabling students to develop their strengths and address any weaker areas.

School of History, Archaeology and Religion
In 2013/14, 92% of the School's graduates who were available for work reported they were in employment and/or further study within six months of graduation.
 
School of Modern Languages
In 2013/14, 95% of the School's graduates who were available for work reported they were in employment and/or further study within six months of graduation.

The destinations from the School are often international in nature, with many graduates enjoying their overseas student experience to such an extent that they opt to take time out to travel further, or go abroad on graduation in the hope of securing employment. 

Of those who choose to remain in the UK, many start work immediately following their studies. Their employment options are varied and many opt to utilise the language skills that they have developed over their degree, in roles such as Translators, Language Assistants, Export Assistants and Proofreaders, working with their languages in organisations such as Bearmach Ltd, the British Council, Global Response and Inter Global.

Duration

4 Year(s)

Next intake

September 2016

Places available

Typical places available

Applications received

Typical applications received

Accreditations

QAA subject benchmark

QAA subject benchmark

Linguistics

Classics and Ancient History

 

What are the aims of this Programme?

The BA in Ancient History and Spanish (Joint Honours) gives students the opportunity to combine learning a major world language with the study of the ancient Greek and Roman world. Students divide their modules equally between Ancient History and Spanish, with a third subject in the first year. The School of European Languages, Translation and Politics aims to create ‘global citizens’ of its students and, with in-depth study of both Ancient History and Spanish, graduates will be an asset in an increasingly global workforce.

In Spanish, students develop high-level language skills, with the aim of achieving near-native competency.  Students will also spend their third year in Spain, practising and developing their acquired language skills.

Ancient History covers the period from the Aegean Bronze Age to the fall of the Roman Empire in the west and its survival in the east as the Byzantine Empire. The emphasis is on developing students’ knowledge and critical understanding of the political, social, economic and cultural structures of Greek and Roman societies, which were significantly different from modern industrialised societies, but have exercised a profound and continuous influence on the subsequent development of European and many other societies and cultures. There is a balance between modules covering specific historical periods and thematic modules that examine broad social and cultural topics, such as warfare, gender, religion, art, medicine and science.

What is expected of me?

Students are expected to attend all scheduled teaching, including lectures, seminars, classes, workshops and tutorials, and to engage in independent study outside scheduled teaching hours in order to familiarise themselves with a good range of primary evidence and modern approaches to the subject. Each 10-credit module should involve a minimum of 100 hours’ work.

Full expectations for students are outlined in the University’s Student Charter:

http://www.cardiff.ac.uk/for/current/student-charter/

 

How is this Programme Structured?

BA Ancient History and Spanish is a four-year degree programme, including a year spent abroad.Students take 120 credits in each year, progressing from more general modules in the first year to more specialised modules in the second and fourth years.

Year One students study:

  • 40 credits of Ancient History modules, covering Greek and Roman history;
  • 40 credits of Spanish language modules at Beginners or Advanced level;
  • 40 credits in another Humanities subject.

Year Two students study:

  • 60 credits of optional modules in Ancient History, which may include a practical course on using different types of historical evidence and an independent study on a topic of their choice;
  • 60 credits of modules in Spanish, including a core module in Spanish language.

Year Three is spent abroad.

Year Four students study:

  • 60 credits of optional modules in Ancient History;
  • 60 credits of modules in Spanish, including a core module in Spanish language.
  • Students may opt to write a dissertation on a topic of their choice in either subject.

Will I need any specific equipment to study this Programme?

No

What skills will I practise and develop?

Students will acquire and develop a range of essential transferable and discipline-specific skills, including:

  • intellectual skills,such as critical thinking, reasoning, assimilating and summarising complex information and ideas, analysing and evaluating evidence, critiquing interpretations or arguments, coping with uncertainty or incomplete data, constructing arguments based on evidence, and presenting them effectively in writing and in debate;
  • employability skills,such as effective communication through written reports and oral presentations, contributing to group discussions, working independently and in teams, using IT resources effectively, and time management;
  • enterprise skills,such as creativity(practised especially in the Independent Study project), problem-solving, initiative, and independent thinking;
  • research skills(developed especially in the Independent Study and Dissertation modules): defining a project, formulating research questions, locating relevant information, and presenting the results in an oral presentation and an extended written report;
  • discipline-specific skills:analysing historical problems, locating and using appropriate evidence and bibliographic resources, handling literary and archaeological material, analysing images, reading inscriptions, papyri and coins, and understanding the scholarly conventions used in relation to these types of evidence;
  • language skills:the development of high-level language skills with the aim of achieving near-native competency in Spanish; the programme also offers an opportunity for students to study Latin and Greek at beginner’s and intermediate level, and to read texts in the original languages.

How will I be taught?

Teaching is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars, classes, practical workshops, field trips and individual tutorials.  Spanish is taught in small interactive classes designed to enable students to acquire grammatical precision and advanced written and oral communication skills.Students also undertake independent study and research, under the guidance of a supervisor.

How will I be assessed?

Assessment:

Modules are assessed by various methods, including coursework essays, written reports, source criticisms, examinations, class tests, and oral presentations.

Feedback:

Students receive written feedback on all their coursework assessments, and oral feedback on assessed presentations and work done in classes and seminars. Feedback on assessed coursework may be supplemented by one-to-one tutorials. Individual or class feedback may be provided for exams. Students receive oral and written feedback from their supervisor on preparatory work and drafts for the Independent Study and Dissertation.

How will I be supported?

All modules make extensive use of Cardiff University’s Virtual Learning Environment, Learning Central, where students can access course materials and links to related reading and online resources. In addition to the main University libraries, students have access to the Sheila White Library, which contains additional copies of books on Greek and Roman history and culture. All students are assigned a Personal Tutor in both Ancient History and Spanish, who are able to advise on academic and pastoral matters in a confidential and informal manner. Personal Tutors meet students regularly to discuss progress and provide advice and guidance, and are available for consultation at other times as needed. Opportunities for students to reflect on their abilities and performance are made available through a structured programme of Personal Development Planning and through scheduled meetings with Personal Tutors.

What are the Learning Outcomes of this Programme?

Upon completion of the programme, a typical graduate will demonstrate:

  • a high level of language competency in Spanish, both orally and in writing;
  • a knowledge and critical understanding of a broad range of Greek, Roman and Spanish history, politics, society and culture;
  • a knowledge and critical understanding of a wide variety of primary source material, including literary, documentary, epigraphic, visual, and archaeological evidence;
  • an understanding of different modern approaches to the study of ancient history, and an ability to evaluate and employ a range of approaches and methods;
  • an awareness of different interpretations of ancient history, and an ability to evaluate and critique them;
  • an ability to construct arguments and solve problems through critical use of primary evidence, with reference to appropriate modern approaches;
  • an ability to appreciate and understand different cultures;
  • an ability to formulate research questions and to conduct independent research;
  • an ability to present ideas and arguments effectively and coherently in written and oral form.

Other information

None

Admissions tutors

Dr Louis Rawlings, Admissions Tutor


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