Ancient History and German (BA)

Ancient History and German (BA) offers students the chance to examine ancient civilization alongside a contemporary and increasingly popular language at degree level.

The BA in Ancient History and German (joint honours) gives students the opportunity to combine learning a major world language with the study of the ancient Greek and Roman world. With in-depth study of both Ancient History and German, graduates will develop the tools to compete in an increasingly global workforce.

The BA in Ancient History and German aims to develop your knowledge and critical understanding of the political, social, economic, and cultural structures of other societies, and to cultivate intellectual skills such as the ability to assess evidence critically, to evaluate different interpretations of the evidence, to construct arguments on the basis of evidence, and to express opinions cogently in speech and in writing. In German, you develop high-level language skills with the aim of achieving near-native competency along with in-depth knowledge of aspects of the culture, history, politics and society of German and other German-speaking countries. 

The course  will enable you to develop your writing skills through a range of exercises including resumes and essays with your oral and aural skills being practised through a varied pool of audio-video material, websites, films and computer programmes. It is important to remember that studying languages is not just about the language itself. It involves examining many aspects of a country and its culture, its social structures and institutions, politics, history, literature and cinema. Through the study of such areas you are able to gain a better understanding of German culture and of how Germany has evolved over the centuries, becoming what it is today.

Ancient History covers the period from the Aegean Bronze Age to the fall of the Roman Empire in the west and its survival in the east as the Byzantine Empire. There is a balance between modules covering specific historical periods and thematic modules that examine broad social and cultural topics, such as warfare, gender, religion, art, medicine and science. 

The degree provides the training necessary for students who wish to study Ancient History or German at postgraduate level, and a valuable range of intellectual and transferable skills for students who enter other professions.

The German department places firm emphasis on vocational linguistic training, giving students first-hand experience of using vital language skills alongside their historical academic studies.Students spend their third year in Germany, practising and developing their language skills.

Key facts

UCAS CodeRV21
Entry pointSeptember 2016
Duration4 years
Typical places availableThe School of History, Archaeology and Religion typically has 320 places available.
Typical applications receivedThe School of History, Archaeology and Religion typically receives 1800 applications.
Typical A level offerABB. Three A-level subjects, generally including a B in a modern foreign language for beginners or B in German for the advanced pathway. Exceptions can be made according to personal circumstances. Two AS subjects may be considered in lieu of a third A-level.
Typical Welsh Baccalaureate offerGrade A in the Core plus AA grades at A-level (must include a modern foreign language at A-level).
Typical International Baccalaureate offerConsidered on individual merit but must include 6 in a modern foreign language.
Other qualificationsApplications from those offering alternative qualifications are welcome.

Detailed alternative entry requirements are available for this course.
QAA subject benchmark
Admissions tutor(s)

Dr Louis Rawlings, Course Administrator

Dr Louis Rawlings, Admissions Tutor

Ms Elke Oerter, Admissions Tutor

Important Legal Information: The programme information currently being published in Course Finder is under review and may be subject to change. The final programme information is due to be published by May 2016 and will be the definitive programme outline which the University intends to offer. Applicants are advised to check the definitive programme information after the update, to ensure that the programme meets their needs.

This is a four-year degree programme comprising of some core modules that provide essential skills and training as well as a wide variety of optional modules for you to select from in order to tailor your degree to meet your interests.  

Ancient History provides you with the opportunity to study Greek and Roman history and society from the emergence of Greek communities after the end of the Bronze age to the fall of the Roman Empire in the west and its survival in the east as the Byzantine Empire. It offers a balance between modules on historical periods (such as fifth and fourth century BC Greece, the conquests of Alexander the Great, the Roman Republic, Early Imperial Rome and the Later Roman Empire) and thematic social and cultural aspects (such as warfare, religion, politics, art, medicine, gender and ethnicity).

It is a discipline concerned with the understanding of ancient societies through the interpretation of ancient evidence and the construction of historical arguments. An Ancient History degree at Cardiff will provide you with a critical understanding of the essential characteristics and achievements of Greek and Roman societies, which have exercised a profound and continuous influence on the subsequent development of European and many other societies and cultures.

German is the native language of nearly one hundred million people. To speak German is to be in touch with a vibrant cultural and political world. In addition, Germany's economic and political role in Europe makes a deep knowledge of German language and Germanic culture a great asset in life. A recent survey by the UK's leading employers' organisation CBI rates German as the language most valued by UK managers. German is one of the two key languages of the EU and very useful if you want to work for EU institutions including the Directorate General for Translation.

At Cardiff, we consider the linguistic skill that you acquire as a key competence for studying German and Austrian culture, in particular literature, history, and film. Your understanding of German will also be deepened and enhanced during your time abroad, when you will be fully immersed in the culture of a German-speaking country.

Our German department combines traditional coverage and breadth with new interdisciplinary and theoretical approaches. Our students receive a comprehensive introduction to the language, literatures, cultures and intellectual history of the German-speaking countries and to the increasingly multicultural, transnational, and global contexts that define these cultures today.

At undergraduate level, we offer challenging language, culture, literature, and intellectual history courses. German contributes significantly to a first-rate humanities education in Cardiff and to the intellectual core of our large, research-orientated university. Our teaching of languages and cultures aims to prepare students for global citizenship and for that reason we offer many year abroad opportunities.

Year one

As well as students with A-level German, we also welcome students who have no previous knowledge of German. Such applicants will generally require an A-level in another modern foreign language. 

Students studying this course will take 60 credits in Ancient History and 60 credits in German. Our ‘Key optional modules’ indicate the modules you would be required to study depending on your subject specific A-levels, for example, modules at beginner or advanced level. 

Please note that for 2016/17, the Language element will increase from 20 credits to 40 credits.

Year two

Module titleModule codeCredits
Japanese HistoryML150110 credits
Contemporary Japanese SocietyML250510 credits
Linear AlgebraMA021210 credits
GroupsMA021310 credits
Elementary Number Theory IIMA021610 credits
Analysis IIIMA022110 credits
Modelling with Differential EquationsMA023210 credits
Elementary Fluid DynamicsMA023510 credits
Operational ResearchMA026120 credits
Visual Basic Programming For ORMA027610 credits
AccountancyMA029110 credits
Calculus of Several VariablesMA200110 credits
Matrix AlgebraMA200210 credits
Complex AnalysisMA200310 credits
Series and TransformsMA200410 credits
Ordinary Differential EquationsMA200510 credits
Mechanics IIMA230010 credits
Vector CalculusMA230110 credits
Foundations of Probability and StatisticsMA250020 credits
Programming and StatisticsMA250110 credits
Numerical Analysis IIMA270010 credits
Yr Ystafell Newyddion 1MC261720 credits
Yr Ystafell Newyddion 2MC261820 credits
C ProgrammingCE514010 credits
C++ ProgrammingCE514310 credits
Computer Forensics Investigation and ResponseCE517810 credits
Java ProgrammingCE514610 credits
Shell and Perl ProgrammingCE514710 credits
Windows Powershell ProgrammingCE514810 credits
The Archaeology of the VikingsHS237920 credits
Elementary Sanskrit IRT120120 credits
Elementary Sanskrit IIRT120220 credits
Intermediate Sanskrit TextsRT122420 credits
Elementary Arabic IRT120320 credits
Elementary Arabic IIRT120420 credits
New Testament Greek Texts IRT320920 credits
Emotions, Symbols, and Rituals: Studying Societies Through FilmRT121520 credits
New Testament EpistlesRT320520 credits
Beliefs in the CrucibleRT520420 credits
Christian 'Church' Today: Its Meaning, Life and MissionRT520520 credits
Reformation HistoryRT420520 credits
The Early Church: History and MemoryRT420820 credits
Julian the ApostateHS330710 credits
Greek ValuesHS330910 credits
Gender & Sexuality in Greece and RomeHS336220 credits
Hellenistic Art and ArchitectureHS435610 credits
Reading Latin 1HS342120 credits
Latin Historical TextsHS334310 credits
Reading Greek IHS342320 credits
Greek Historical TextsHS334510 credits
Byzantium: The Golden Age, c. 850 - 1050HS332910 credits
Science and Technology in the Graeco-Roman WorldHS337310 credits
Ancient Persia: the Achaemenid Dynasty 559-331 BCEHS337820 credits
Early Rome: History and ArchaeologyHS436010 credits
Art and Power in Rome, 211 BC - AD138HS436810 credits
Reading Latin 2HS332220 credits
Latin Historical TextsHS334410 credits
Reading Greek 2HS332420 credits
Greek Historical TextsHS334610 credits
Conquest & Crisis: The Roman RepublicHS331630 credits
Rome and CarthageHS333320 credits
Myth and History in Ancient Greek CultureHS337520 credits
The Roman ArmyHS436720 credits
The History of Archaeological ThoughtHS235020 credits
Neolithic/Early Bronze Age BritainHS235720 credits
Structure & Corrosion of MetalsHS235910 credits
Structure & Decay of Inorganic MaterialsHS236010 credits
Roman BritainHS236220 credits
Complex Societies in Barbarian EuropeHS236510 credits
Medieval ArchaeologyHS238220 credits
Art & Archaeology of Archaic GreeceHS238620 credits
Technology and MaterialsHS240010 credits
Museums Collections ManagementHS242120 credits
Neolithic Beginnings: Last Foragers and First Farmers in the Eastern MediterraneanHS242420 credits
Archaeology Independent StudyHS243320 credits
Independent Science ProjectHS243420 credits
War, Peace and Diplomacy, c.900-c.1250HS170730 credits
Heresy & Dissent 1000-1450HS171030 credits
'The Devil's Brood' The Angevin Kings of England 1154-1272HS171330 credits
Building the Modern WorldHS174430 credits
Nations, Empire and Borderlands from 1789 to the presentHS174930 credits
A Great Leap Forward China Transformed 1840-PresentHS175230 credits
From King Coal To Cool Cymru: Society and Culture in Wales, 1939-2000HS175630 credits
Diwydiannaeth, Radicaliaeth a'r Bobl Gyffredin yng Nghymru a Phrydain mewn Oes Chwyldro, c. 1789-1880HS175730 credits
Radicalism and the Common People, 1789-1880HS175830 credits
The Making of 'World Religions' in South Asia: Hindus, Sikhs and Muslims from the fifteenth century to the present dayHS176630 credits
The Search for an Asian Modern: Japanese History from 1800 to the Post-War EraHS176830 credits
Martyrs and Collaborators: Catholicism behind the Iron CurtainHS177230 credits
Making Empires: Britain and the World, 1541 - 1714HS179330 credits
Arabic Texts IRT131020 credits
Religion and the News: Conflict and ContextRT130020 credits
Myth and The Movies: Anthropology and Psychology in Contemporary CinemaRT135020 credits
Socially Engaged Buddhism: Politics, Justice and EthicsRT133520 credits
The Life of the BuddhaRT135220 credits
The Making of 'World Religions' in South Asia: Hindus, Sikhs and MuslimsRT133620 credits
The Most Famous Hindu Text: Bhagavadgita, Text & ContextRT135520 credits
Exploring GnosticismRT135920 credits
Christian Spirituality, 150-1550 CERT430720 credits
Understanding Christian WorshipRT432020 credits
Pastor, Martyr, Prophet, Spy: Bonhoeffer's Life and LegacyRT432620 credits
Christian Social Ethics TodayRT731720 credits
Majority World Voices: Global South TheologiesRT734220 credits
Islam in the Contemporary WorldRT132720 credits
Islamic Law and SocietyRT136120 credits
God, Good and the Ugly: Topics in Applied Islamic EthicsRT135720 credits
History & Religion of Ancient IsraelRT230120 credits
Module titleModule codeCredits
Reading Latin 2HS332220 credits
Reading Greek 2HS332420 credits
Latin Historical TextsHS334310 credits
Latin Historical TextsHS334410 credits
Greek Historical TextsHS334610 credits
Reading Latin 1HS342120 credits
Reading Greek IHS342320 credits
Independent 2nd Year StudyHS433420 credits
German Language Year 2 (Ex-Advanced)ML729920 credits
German Language Year 2 (Ex-Beginners)ML729820 credits
Innovations in European LiteratureML129820 credits
Principles of Translation TheoryML229920 credits
Greek Historical TextsHS334510 credits
Pots, Poems and Pictures: Using Evidence for Ancient HistoryHS433620 credits
Business German IML728820 credits
At the Roots of European CulturesML129520 credits
Introduction to Specialised Translation (German)ML229520 credits
Bertolt BrechtML729020 credits
Storm and StressML729120 credits
Julian the ApostateHS330710 credits
Greek ValuesHS330910 credits
Gender & Sexuality in Greece and RomeHS336220 credits
Hellenistic Art and ArchitectureHS435610 credits
Byzantium: The Golden Age, c. 850 - 1050HS332910 credits
Science and Technology in the Graeco-Roman WorldHS337310 credits
Ancient Persia: the Achaemenid Dynasty 559-331 BCEHS337820 credits
Early Rome: History and ArchaeologyHS436010 credits
Art and Power in Rome, 211 BC - AD138HS436810 credits
Introduction to Computing for Archaeologists and Ancient HistoriansHS241610 credits
Computer Projects for Archaeologists and Ancient HistoriansHS241710 credits
Roman BritainHS236220 credits
Art & Archaeology of Archaic GreeceHS238620 credits
Conquest & Crisis: The Roman RepublicHS331630 credits
Rome and CarthageHS333320 credits
Myth and History in Ancient Greek CultureHS337520 credits
The Roman ArmyHS436720 credits
National Socialism & its LegacyML728620 credits

Year three: Sandwich year

Your third year is spent studying abroad.

Year four

In Year 4, you choose a further 60 credits of Ancient History and 60 credits of German, including a core module in German language. If you wish, you can write a dissertation on a topic of your choice in either Ancient History or German.

Module titleModule codeCredits
German Language (BA Languages)ML739020 credits

Module titleModule codeCredits
Spin Unspun: Public Relations and The News MediaMC359620 credits
KnotsMA032210 credits
Fluid DynamicsMA033210 credits
Mathematical ProgrammingMA035810 credits
Time Series Analysis & ForecastingMA036710 credits
Complex Function TheoryMA300010 credits
Groups, Rings, and FieldsMA300310 credits
CombinatoricsMA300410 credits
Introduction to Functional and Fourier AnalysisMA300520 credits
Introduction to Coding Theory and Data CompressionMA300620 credits
Applied Nonlinear SystemsMA330110 credits
Theoretical and Computational Partial Differential EquationsMA330320 credits
Methods of Applied MathematicsMA330420 credits
Elements of Mathematical StatisticsMA350110 credits
Regression Analysis and Experimental DesignMA350220 credits
Stochastic Processes For Finance and InsuranceMA350320 credits
Official StatisticsMA350410 credits
Multivariate StatisticsMA350510 credits
Queueing, Inventory and Game TheoryMA360120 credits
Algorithms and HeuristicsMA360210 credits
Mathematical Methods For Data MiningMA370010 credits
Functional AnalysisMA400120 credits
Measure TheoryMA400720 credits
Computational Fluid DynamicsMA400820 credits
Mathematical Principles of Image ProcessingMA400920 credits
COMBINATORIAL AND ANALYTIC NUMBER THEORYMA401120 credits
FINITE ELASTICITYMA401220 credits
Advanced topics in Analysis with application to PDEsMA401320 credits
Reading ModuleMA490120 credits
Cyflwyniad i addysgu Mathemateg mewn ysgol uwchraddMA390020 credits
Theori a Beirniadaeth LenyddolCY333020 credits
Llenyddiaeth PlantCY331020 credits
SosioieithyddiaethCY353020 credits
TafodieithegCY345020 credits
Technoleg Iaith mewn Cymdeithas DdigidolCY380520 credits
Ailddehongli Llenyddiaeth yr Oesoedd CanolCY310020 credits
Llenyddiaeth er 1900CY320020 credits
Julian the ApostateHS330710 credits
Greek ValuesHS330910 credits
Gender & Sexuality in Greece and RomeHS336220 credits
Hellenistic Art and ArchitectureHS435610 credits
Reading Latin 1HS342120 credits
Latin Historical TextsHS334310 credits
Reading Greek IHS342320 credits
Greek Historical TextsHS334510 credits
Byzantium: The Golden Age, c. 850 - 1050HS332910 credits
Science and Technology in the Graeco-Roman WorldHS337310 credits
Ancient Persia: the Achaemenid Dynasty 559-331 BCEHS337820 credits
Early Rome: History and ArchaeologyHS436010 credits
Art and Power in Rome, 211 BC - AD138HS436810 credits
Reading Latin 2HS332220 credits
Latin Historical TextsHS334410 credits
Reading Greek 2HS332420 credits
Greek Historical TextsHS334610 credits
Conquest & Crisis: The Roman RepublicHS331630 credits
Rome and CarthageHS333320 credits
Myth and History in Ancient Greek CultureHS337520 credits
The Roman ArmyHS436720 credits
The History of Archaeological ThoughtHS235020 credits
Neolithic/Early Bronze Age BritainHS235720 credits
Structure & Corrosion of MetalsHS235910 credits
Structure & Decay of Inorganic MaterialsHS236010 credits
Roman BritainHS236220 credits
Complex Societies in Barbarian EuropeHS236510 credits
Medieval ArchaeologyHS238220 credits
Art & Archaeology of Archaic GreeceHS238620 credits
Technology and MaterialsHS240010 credits
Museums Collections ManagementHS242120 credits
Neolithic Beginnings: Last Foragers and First Farmers in the Eastern MediterraneanHS242420 credits
Archaeology Independent StudyHS243320 credits
Independent Science ProjectHS243420 credits
Archaeology DissertationHS243540 credits
Archaeological Science DissertationHS243640 credits
The World of the Anglo-Saxons, c.500-c.1087HS180330 credits
The Military Orders 1100-1320HS180530 credits
Slavery and SinHS181830 credits
Crime in England and Wales, c.1570-c.1790HS182330 credits
Cultures of Power: The Gentry of Tudor and Stuart EnglandHS182730 credits
Deviants, Rebels and Witches in Early Modern Britain and IrelandHS182830 credits
Conflict, Coercion and Mass Mobilisation in Republican China 1911-1945HS183830 credits
Glimpses of the Unfamiliar: Travellers to Japan from 1860 to the Post-War EraHS185830 credits
Socialism, Society and Politics in Britain 1880-1918HS186030 credits
Llafur, Sosialaeth a Chymru, 1880-1979HS186230 credits
Culture, Soc & I.D. in Wales 1847-1914HS186530 credits
Class, Protest and Politics: South Wales 1918-39HS186830 credits
Czechoslovakia: The View from Central EuropeHS188430 credits
Europe and the Revolutionary Tradition in the Long Nineteenth CenturyHS188730 credits
Gender, Power and Subjectivity in Twentieth-Century BritainHS189430 credits
The Arts in War and Peace: Culture and Politics in Britain, c.1930-1960HS189730 credits
Arabic Texts IRT131020 credits
Religion and the News: Conflict and ContextRT130020 credits
Myth and The Movies: Anthropology and Psychology in Contemporary CinemaRT135020 credits
Socially Engaged Buddhism: Politics, Justice and EthicsRT133520 credits
The Life of the BuddhaRT135220 credits
The Making of 'World Religions' in South Asia: Hindus, Sikhs and MuslimsRT133620 credits
The Most Famous Hindu Text: Bhagavadgita, Text & ContextRT135520 credits
Exploring GnosticismRT135920 credits
Christian Spirituality, 150-1550 CERT430720 credits
Understanding Christian WorshipRT432020 credits
Pastor, Martyr, Prophet, Spy: Bonhoeffer's Life and LegacyRT432620 credits
Christian Social Ethics TodayRT731720 credits
Majority World Voices: Global South TheologiesRT734220 credits
Islam in the Contemporary WorldRT132720 credits
Islamic Law and SocietyRT136120 credits
God, Good and the Ugly: Topics in Applied Islamic EthicsRT135720 credits
History & Religion of Ancient IsraelRT230120 credits
The Archaeology of the VikingsHS237920 credits
Elementary Sanskrit IRT120120 credits
Elementary Sanskrit IIRT120220 credits
Intermediate Sanskrit TextsRT122420 credits
Elementary Arabic IRT120320 credits
Elementary Arabic IIRT120420 credits
New Testament Greek Texts IRT320920 credits
Emotions, Symbols, and Rituals: Studying Societies Through FilmRT121520 credits
New Testament EpistlesRT320520 credits
Beliefs in the CrucibleRT520420 credits
Christian 'Church' Today: Its Meaning, Life and MissionRT520520 credits
Reformation HistoryRT420520 credits
The Early Church: History and MemoryRT420820 credits
Module titleModule codeCredits
Reading Latin 2HS332220 credits
Reading Greek 2HS332420 credits
Latin Historical TextsHS334310 credits
Latin Historical TextsHS334410 credits
Greek Historical TextsHS334610 credits
Reading Latin 1HS342120 credits
Reading Greek IHS342320 credits
The GDR in Literature & Visual CultureML739120 credits
May 68. Marking Changes in European Politics and CultureML139920 credits
Student Language AmbassadorML139820 credits
German for professional purposesML738720 credits
Translation as a ProfessionML239320 credits
Greek Historical TextsHS334510 credits
Researching the Ancient World: Final Year DissertationHS433540 credits
Advanced Translation Practice (German)ML738920 credits
Dissertation (German-JH)ML738820 credits
Joint Honours German Dissertation (in ENGLISH/WELSH)ML738620 credits
Pots, Poems and Pictures: Using Evidence for Ancient HistoryHS433620 credits
European Cinema: thinking the real of fictionML230220 credits
Dissertation/Project (Translation)ML238920 credits
Geschichte oder Geschichten? - die Gegenwartsliteratur im historichen KontextML737020 credits
Julian the ApostateHS330710 credits
Greek ValuesHS330910 credits
Gender & Sexuality in Greece and RomeHS336220 credits
Hellenistic Art and ArchitectureHS435610 credits
Byzantium: The Golden Age, c. 850 - 1050HS332910 credits
Science and Technology in the Graeco-Roman WorldHS337310 credits
Ancient Persia: the Achaemenid Dynasty 559-331 BCEHS337820 credits
Early Rome: History and ArchaeologyHS436010 credits
Art and Power in Rome, 211 BC - AD138HS436810 credits
Introduction to Computing for Archaeologists and Ancient HistoriansHS241610 credits
Computer Projects for Archaeologists and Ancient HistoriansHS241710 credits
Roman BritainHS236220 credits
Art & Archaeology of Archaic GreeceHS238620 credits
Conquest & Crisis: The Roman RepublicHS331630 credits
Rome and CarthageHS333320 credits
Myth and History in Ancient Greek CultureHS337520 credits
The Roman ArmyHS436720 credits
Dissertation (Single honours - in German)ML739740 credits
Dissertation (Single Honours - in English)ML739640 credits
The University is committed to providing a wide range of module options where possible, but please be aware that whilst every effort is made to offer choice this may be limited in certain circumstances. This is due to the fact that some modules have limited numbers of places available, which are allocated on a first-come, first-served basis, while others have minimum student numbers required before they will run, to ensure that an appropriate quality of education can be delivered; some modules require students to have already taken particular subjects, and others are core or required on the programme you are taking. Modules may also be limited due to timetable clashes, and although the University works to minimise disruption to choice, we advise you to seek advice from the relevant School on the module choices available.

School of History, Archaeology and Religion

The School of History, Archaeology and Religion enables you to develop in a high-quality learning environment, supported by a student-orientated approach to the acquisition of knowledge and skills. You will develop a range of intellectual skills: critical thinking, evaluating evidence, constructing evidence-based arguments, and presenting opinions effectively in writing and in debate. Additionally, you will gain practical skills such as team-working, independent research, and time management. Teaching methods include lectures, seminars, practicals, field trips, and one-to-one tutorials. You will also undertake independent study and research, with guidance from tutors. Assessment, including coursework, exams, practical work, and oral presentations, will test the different skills you have learned.

School of Modern Languages 

Lectures provide an overview of the key concepts and frameworks for a topic, equipping students to carry out independent research for the seminars and to develop their own ideas.

Seminars provide an opportunity for students to explore the ideas outlined in the lecture in a small group environment. Seminars would usually consist of about 15 students and the seminar leader (a member of the teaching team). Seminars may take various formats, including plenary group discussion, small group work and student-led presentations. Seminars offer a rewarding opportunity to engage critically with the key ideas and reading of a topic, and to explore areas of particular interest with an expert in the field. It is vital that students prepare for seminars (undertaking any set reading, developing independent critical thought) in order to gain the maximum benefit from the sessions.

Lectures and seminars enable students to develop communication and analytical skills, and to develop critical thinking in a supportive environment.

Essays and examinations are used not only for assessment purposes but also as a means of developing students’ capacities to gather, organise, evaluate and deploy relevant information and ideas from a variety of sources in reasoned arguments. Dedicated essay workshops and individual advice enables students to produce their best work, and written feedback on essays feeds forward into future work, enabling students to develop their strengths and address any weaker areas.

School of History, Archaeology and Religion

In 2013/14, 92% of the School's graduates who were available for work reported they were in employment and/or further study within six months of graduation.

Cardiff School of Modern Languages

In 2013/14, 95% of the School's graduates who were available for work reported they were in employment and/or further study within six months of graduation.

The destinations from the School are often international in nature, with many graduates enjoying their overseas student experience to such an extent that they opt to take time out to travel further, or go abroad on graduation in the hope of securing employment. 

Of those who choose to remain in the UK, many start work immediately following their studies. Their employment options are varied and many opt to utilise the language skills that they have developed over their degree, in roles such as Translators, Language Assistants, Export Assistants and Proofreaders, working with their languages in organisations such as Bearmach Ltd, the British Council, Global Response and Inter Global.

Duration

4 Year(s)

Next intake

September 2016

Places available

Typical places available

SCHOOL OF MODERN LANGUAGES

In 2013/14, 95% of the School’s graduates who were available for work reported they were in employment and/or further study within six months of graduation.

Many graduates enjoy their year overseas so much that they take time out for more travel, or go abroad on graduation in the hope of finding a job. Of those who choose to remain in the UK, many start work immediately following their studies.

Employment options include roles as translators, language assistants, export assistants and proofreaders, working with their languages in organisations such as Bearmach Ltd, the British Council, Global Response and Inter Global.

There has been an upsurge in career opportunities for graduates in German in the commercial and institutional links within the European Union. Opportunities also exist in teaching, museum work, the fine arts, banking, insurance, marketing, publishing, the media, the civil service and tourism.

SCHOOL OF HISTORY, ARCHAEOLOGY AND RELIGION

In 2013/14, 92% of the School’s graduates who were available for work reported they were in employment and/or further study within six months of graduation.

We organise interactive workshops with the Careers Service to help students identify their skills and attributes. History graduates find work in a wide range of related and non-related professional employment. Some choose to undertake postgraduate study at Cardiff or elsewhere, and some have become internationally reputed historians.

Applications received

Typical applications received

Accreditations

QAA subject benchmark

QAA subject benchmark

Overview and aims of this course/programme

Many students find studying a joint honours stimulating and rewarding as they are able to observe both similarities and differences between the two subjects. By combining Ancient History and German, you will gain a variety of transferable skills and knowledge beneficial for your future.

The Ancient History courses at Cardiff University cover the period from the Aegean Bronze Age to the fall of the Roman Empire in the west and its survival in the east as the Byzantine Empire. There is a balance between modules covering specific historical periods and those that examine broad social and cultural topics, such as warfare, gender, religion, art, medicine and science.

German is the native language of nearly one hundred million people. To speak German is to be part of a crucially important political, economic and cultural world. A recent survey by the UK's leading employers' organisation, the CBI, rated German as the language most valued by UK managers. Germany is considered to be the lynchpin of the European Union, making knowledge of the language as important in Brussels as in Berlin.

You will develop high-level language skills with the aim of achieving near-native competency along with in-depth knowledge of aspects of the culture, history, politics and society of Germany. You will spend your third year in a German-speaking country, practising and developing your language skills. We offer German for both advanced students and beginners.

It is important to remember that studying languages is not just about the language itself. It involves examining many aspects of a country and its culture, its social structures and institutions, politics, history, literature and cinema. Through the study of such areas you are able to gain a better understanding of German culture and of how it has evolved over the centuries, becoming what it is today.

As a joint honours student, you will find that often there are complementary issues and perspectives that link subjects, be they critical analysis, historical contexts or recent research. 

Each school involved in delivering the degree offers a challenging course of modules, supported by a friendly atmosphere and excellent staff-student relationships.

What should I know about year five?

How is this course/programme structured?

This full-time course lasts for four years with two semesters per year. There are 120 credits a year, split equally between the two subjects. Most modules are worth 20 credits. The third year is spent abroad.

What should I know about year four?

In your final year you will take 60 credits in Ancient History and 60 credits in German.

We no longer distinguish between beginner and advanced German students in the final year and all students will take the same language modules. You will refine your linguistic skills in terms of expression and translation, and specialise in your areas of interest by choosing specialised module options. 

Our final year dissertation module gives you the option to write a dissertation and engage more deeply with a chosen topic area, as well as extending your research and analytical skills.

What should I know about year three?

Year three is spent in Germany or Austria.  Your options include studying at one of our partner universities, working as an English assistant in a school through the British Council Scheme, or working for a German organisation or company.

If you choose the study option, we have established academic links with universities in Berlin, Frankfurt, Kassel, Saarbrucken, Mainz, Heidelberg, Rostock, Bochum and Passau.

Placements for teaching assistants on a scheme run by the British Council can take you to either a major city or a small, rural town. This option provides first-hand teaching experience and allows you to earn a salary sufficient to live on, although you only work on a part-time basis. Prior to the start of your placement, the British Council provides a training weekend in the destination country. In addition, the school you have been assigned to should also guide you in your role as a teacher and help you to find a place to live.

The third option consists of a work placement with an organisation or company in the German-speaking world. The necessary arrangements can be made through personal contacts you may have or by approaching organisations directly. In order to ensure that your work placement affords you plenty of opportunity to speak German and provides you with a beneficial experience, such arrangements will require prior approval by the School.

Any student who undertakes a study placement or a traineeship/work placement in Europe is eligible to apply for an Erasmus grant.     

The year abroad is a great opportunity for you to improve your understanding of the language, immerse yourself in another culture, and gain international study or work experience.

While you are away from Cardiff, you will be assigned a year abroad coordinator, who will keep in touch with you and monitor your progress. You may also get a visit from one of your lecturers who will be keen to find out how you are getting on.

Final year students are usually happy to help with our regular year abroad briefings and have contributed to our extensive ‘year abroad module’ on Learning Central which provides you with student-centred advice throughout your year abroad.

What should I know about the preliminary year?

What should I know about year one?

You will take 60 credits from Ancient History and 60 credits from German during their first year

The first year of Ancient History provides you with a focused introduction to the study of Greek and Roman history at University which fosters your critical and analytical skills through close engagement with the ancient sources and modern interpretations.

In year one German you will build on core linguistic skills and be introduced to German culture, literature, civilisation and politics. There are two pathways available: an advanced pathway for students with an A-level or equivalent competence in German and a beginner’s pathway for students with limited or no knowledge of German.

The first year of this programme provides a thorough foundation in the grammar of the language for those students on the beginner’s pathway, and develops the linguistic skills for post A-level students on the advanced pathway.

Other information

Distinctive features

The distinctive features of the course include:

  • core modules that provide a solid base for all, but then allow you, with advice from your personal tutor, to carve out a programme that will best fit your interests and career aspirations
  • research-led teaching allowing you to engage with new ideas that are helping to shape the future of Ancient History and German studies
  • a pathway into this degree for beginners who do not have German A-level
  • a year spent studying or working in a German-speaking country.

How will I be taught?

We offer a supportive learning environment, where you are enabled to acquire a range of skills and a wealth of specialist knowledge. Our courses foster intellectual skills, such as critical thinking, close analysis, evaluating evidence, constructing arguments, using theory and the effective deployment of language in writing and in debate. We also help you gain experience in team working, independent research and time management.

You will be taught both by lecture and seminar. Lectures provide an overview of the key concepts and frameworks for a topic, equipping you to carry out independent research for the seminars and to develop your own ideas. Seminars provide an opportunity for you to explore the ideas outlined in the lectures.

Seminars usually consist of about 15 students and the seminar leader (a member of the teaching team). Seminars may take various formats, including plenary group discussion, small-group work and student-led presentations.

Admissions tutors

Dr Louis Rawlings, Course Administrator

Dr Louis Rawlings, Admissions Tutor

Ms Elke Oerter, Admissions Tutor


Key Information Sets (KIS) make it easy for prospective students to compare information about full or part time undergraduate courses, and are available on the Unistats website.

Applying

Get information and advice about making an application, find out when the key dates are and learn more about our admissions criteria.

How to apply
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