Dr Gareth M. Thomas

Dr Gareth M. Thomas

Lecturer in Sociology

+44(0) 29 2087 9675
2.35, Glamorgan Building

I was appointed as Lecturer in Sociology in 2015. I am a sociologist interested in (among other things) medicine, disability, stigma, health, reproduction, genetics, parenthood, and place. My PhD was an ethnographic study of screening for Down's syndrome in two UK prenatal clinics. This study forms the basis of my research monograph, Down's Syndrome Screening and Reproductive Politics: Care, Choice, and Disability in the Prenatal Clinic, which will be published by Routledge in March 2017. I am also Co-Convenor of the Medicine, Science and Culture Research Group (MeSC) at Cardiff University and Co-Book Reviews Editor for the Sociology of Health and Illness journal.

Speaking engagements

Invited Presentations (Most Recent)

  • The digitised pregnant body. Pregnancy, Parenting and Digital Media, University of Canberra, Australia, 27 June 2015 
  • An ethnographic study of prenatal screening for Down's syndrome: reflections on findings and the challenges of sensitive research. SAPPHIRE, University of Leicester, 23 February 2015 
  • 'Everything's data, darling': an ethnography of screening for Down's syndrome in antenatal care. Researching Human Reproduction: Methodological and Ethical Aspects. De Montfort University, 5 December 2014 

Conference Presentations (Most Recent) 

  • Threats and thrills: pregnancy apps, risk, and consumption. European Sociological Association RN13 Interim Meeting. University of Bristol, 7 July 2016
  • Threats and thrills: pregnancy apps, risk, and consumption. Eastern Sociological Society Annual Meeting. The Boston Park Plaza Hotel, Boston, MA, 18 March 2016
  • ‘Hands-off work’: how professionals routinise prenatal screening for Down syndrome in the clinic. BSA Medical Sociology 46th Annual Conference. University of York, 11 September 2015
  • ‘It’s just a normal place’: how young people imagine, negotiate and resist the stigmatisation of a post-industrial community. ESHMS 3rd Special Interest Meeting: Europe in a Global Perspective. Norwegian University of Science and Technology, 3 September 2015
  • Sticky reputations: young peoples' negotiation of stigma and place in a post-industrial community. American Sociological Association Annual Meeting. Chicago Hilton, Illinois, 24 August 2015
  • Picture perfect: 4D ultrasound and the commoditisation of the private prenatal clinic. American Sociological Association Annual Meeting. Chicago Hilton, Illinois, 23 August 2015
  • The Organization of Care: How Professionals Perform, Routinize, and Downgrade Screening for Down Syndrome in the Prenatal Clinic. Society for the Study of Symbolic Interaction Annual Conference 2015. The Public Chicago Hotel, Illinois, 22 August 2015
  • 'Hands-Off Work': How Professionals Routinize Prenatal Screening for Down Syndrome in the Clinic. SKAT25: New Directions After a Quarter-Century of the Sociology of Science, Knowledge, and Technology. Chicago Prentice Women's Hospital, Illinois, 21 August 2015
  • Having a hard(d) time? Young peoples' experiences of safety, regulation, and place in a marginalised South Wales community. Pacific Sociology Association Annual Conference. Hyatt Regency Long Beach, California, 4 April 2015
  • In/exclusion in the clinic: Down's syndrome, dysmorphology, and the ethics of everyday care (with Joanna Latimer). BSA Medical Sociology 46th Annual Conference. Aston University, 11 September 2014
  • Odd man out: the male researcher studying a female-dominated hospital setting. BSA Medical Sociology 46th Annual Conference. Aston University, 11 September 2014
  • Expectant parents, expecting perfection: constructing Down's syndrome in British antenatal care. XVIII ISA World Congress of Sociology Conference. Pacifico Yokohama, Japan, 14 July 2014

I teach in both the School of Social Sciences and the School of Medicine on a range of topics including medical encounters, disability, reproduction, stigma, illness, risk, health and genetic technologies, and qualitative methods.

Before my lectureship, I was previously employed as a Research Associate on the ESRC-funded 'Productive Margins: Regulating for Engagement' project (Feb 2014-May 2015). This involved working collaboratively with academics, artists, and community organisers/members to map young peoples' experiences of health and wellbeing, regulation, and place. In June 2015, I was a visiting fellow at the University of Canberra where I carried out a study with Professor Deborah Lupton on pregnancy and parenting 'apps'. I am in the process of working on a grant application to carry out a collaborative qualitative study on patients' and professionals' experiences of non-invasive prenatal testing (NIPT).