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Welsh and History (BA)

  • UCAS code: QV51
  • Next intake: September 2021
  • Duration: 3 years
  • Mode: Full time

Entry Year

Welsh students

Why study this course

By combining Welsh and History, you will gain a wealth of transferable skills and knowledge, opening the doors to a variety of career paths. The time spent on each subject is effectively halved, allowing you to study the Welsh language, its literature and culture, while exploring and understanding key moments in history.

The Welsh course is relevant to contemporary Wales and delivered by a school noted for its research quality and impact. The course aims to produce graduates with a thorough academic and practical understanding of the Welsh language, its literature and culture, a high level of skill in written and spoken Welsh and well-developed employability and creative skills relevant to modern Wales.

The History course covers the period from the fall of the Roman Empire to the present day. There is a balance between modules covering specific historical periods and thematic modules that examine broad social and cultural topics, such as warfare, gender, religion, art, medicine and science. You will learn to think independently, assess the strengths and weaknesses of a body of historical evidence for yourself, and present your findings clearly.

Distinctive features

The distinctive features of the course include:

  • the opportunity to follow a degree course that develops skills relevant to both the academic world and the workplace
  • a core module which focuses on employability skills and which offers a period of work experience
  • a range of core and optional modules in Welsh language, literature and culture as well as the opportunity to specialise in areas of personal and career interest
  • the emphasis on practical research skills, that will benefit you throughout your career
  • the emphasis on independent learning in a supportive environment
  • the involvement of research-active staff in teaching
  • the experience of being taught by staff who will recognise you as an individual
  • History provides significant opportunities for learning and teaching through the medium of Welsh

Where you'll study

School of Welsh

We are committed to the development of language, society and identity in contemporary Wales through teaching and research of the highest standard.

  • icon-chatGet in touch
  • Telephone+44 (0)29 2087 5594
  • MarkerColum Drive, Cardiff, CF10 3EU

School of History, Archaeology and Religion

Curious about the human experience across millennia and cultures, we are seeking to better understand our past, to illuminate our present and improve our future.

  • icon-chatGet in touch
  • Telephone+44 (0)29 2087 4470
  • MarkerColum Drive, Cardiff, CF10 3EU

Entry requirements

ABB-BBB. Must include History and Welsh First or Second Language.

Extended Project Qualification: Applicants with grade A in the EPQ will typically receive an offer one grade lower than the standard A level offer. Please note that any subject specific requirements must still be met.

The Welsh Baccalaureate Advanced Skills Challenge Certificate will be accepted in lieu of one A-Level (at the grades listed above), excluding any specified subjects.

DM in a BTEC Diploma in Humanities or Social Science subjects and grade B in A-level Welsh First or Second Language.

32-31 overall or 665 in 3 HL subjects. Must include grade 5 in HL History. You must also have a Welsh language qualification equivalent to grade B at A-level.

Other UK qualifications may also be accepted, often in lieu of A-levels, but subject requirements must be met. If you are offering non-UK qualifications, our qualification equivalences guide should allow you to calculate what kind of offer you are likely to receive.

Please be aware that this is a general guide, and that some programmes may have more detailed or specific entry requirements which will be reflected in your offer.

GCSE

Grade C or grade 4 in GCSE English Language.

IELTS (academic)

At least 6.5 overall with a minimum of 5.5 in each subskill.

TOEFL iBT

At least 90 overall with minimum scores of 17 for writing, 17 for listening, 18 for reading and 20 for speaking.

PTE Academic

At least 62 overall with a minimum of 51 in all communicative skills.

Trinity ISE II/III

II: at least two Distinctions and two Merits.
III: at least a Pass in all components.

Other accepted qualifications

Please visit our English Language requirements page for more information on our other accepted language qualifications.

You must have or be working towards:
- English language or Welsh language at GCSE grade C/4 or an equivalent (such as A-levels). If you require a Tier 4 visa, you must ensure your language qualification complies with UKVI requirements.

We do not accept Critical Thinking, General Studies, Citizenship Studies, or other similar equivalent subjects.
We will accept a combination of BTEC subjects, A-levels, and other qualifications, subject to the course specific grade and subject requirements.

You are not required to complete a DBS (Disclosure Barring Service) check or provide a Certificate of Good Conduct to study this course. If you are currently subject to any licence condition or monitoring restriction that could affect your ability to successfully complete your studies, you will be required to disclose your criminal record. Conditions include, but are not limited to:

  • access to computers or devices that can store images
  • use of internet and communication tools/devices
  • curfews
  • freedom of movement, including the ability to travel to outside of the UK or to undertake a placement/studies outside of Cardiff University
  • contact with people related to Cardiff University.

Please see our admissions policies for more information about the application process.

Tuition fees

UK and EU students (2021/22)

We are currently awaiting confirmation on tuition fees for the 2021/22 academic year. Fees for the previous year were £9,000.

Students from outside the EU (2021/22)

We are currently awaiting confirmation on tuition fees for the 2021/22 academic year.

Additional costs

Course specific equipment

You will not need any specific equipment.

Accommodation

We have a range of residences to suit your needs and budget. Find out more on our accommodation pages.

Course structure

We are currently working with our students to update and improve the content of this course. The information shown below reflects the current curriculum and is likely to change. The review of the course is expected to be completed by August 2021 and this page will be updated by end of October 2021 to reflect the changes.

This is a three-year full-time degree, consisting of 120 credits a year. You’ll study six 20-credit modules a year, split equally between Welsh and History.

The modules shown are an example of the typical curriculum and will be reviewed prior to the 2021/22 academic year. The final modules will be published by September 2021.

Year one

You will take 120 credits in all. There are two routes in the first year, one for students who have studied Welsh as a first language and the other for students who have studied Welsh as a second language. First-language Welsh students will take 60 credits in Welsh and 60 in History, while second-language students will take 80 credits in Welsh and 40 in History.

The emphasis in year one Welsh is on developing key skills (linguistic, analytical, creative and employability) in the fields of language and literature, and all students follow a set number of modules with an appropriate number of contact hours. The School will also provide additional arrangements for second language students to develop and practise their language skills.

For the first-language route the core modules are:

  • Iaith ac Ystyr [Language and Meaning]
  • Awdur, Testun a Darllenydd [Author, Text and Reader]
  • Y Gymraeg yn y Gymru Gyfoes [The Welsh Language in Contemporary Wales]

As a first year History student you will take modules that introduce you to the different frameworks that underpin historical research and the many different ways of writing history, while providing training in the skills necessary to practice history at undergraduate level.

Module titleModule codeCredits
History in Practice Part 1: Questions, Frameworks and Audiences.HS111920 credits
Module titleModule codeCredits
Sgiliau llafarCY150020 credits
Defnyddio'r GymraegCY150120 credits
Y Gymraeg HeddiwCY150820 credits
Astudio Testunau LlenyddolCY151220 credits
Iaith ac YstyrCY160020 credits
Awdur, Testun a DarllenyddCY160120 credits
Y Gymraeg yn y Gymru GyfoesCY160220 credits
A World Full of GodsHS000120 credits
Projecting the Past: Film, Media and HeritageHS000220 credits
The Making of The Modern World, 1750-1970HS110520 credits
Medieval Worlds, AD 500 -1500HS111220 credits
Renaissance, Reformation and RevolutionHS111720 credits
History in Practice Part 2: Sources, Evidence and Argument.HS112020 credits
Modern Britain: Ideas, Politics, Society and CultureHS113520 credits
Introduction to Ancient History 1: Gods, Kings and Citizens, 1000-323 BCEHS310520 credits
Introduction to Ancient History 2: Empires East and West, 323 BCE to 680 CEHS310620 credits

Year two

You will take 60 credits in Welsh and 60 credits in History.

In year two Welsh, you will build on the skills and knowledge acquired in year one. The core linguistic elements of the course focus on language skills within both an academic and a vocational context, and include a period of work experience in a workplace in which Welsh is used on a daily basis.

Alongside these core elements, the Welsh course offers optional modules in years two and three in Welsh language, literature and culture, including several with direct relevance to specific fields of employment, such as language planning, scriptwriting and translation.

In History, while you will have completed smaller guided tasks in year one, you will now also write longer essays to help you learn, but which do not always contribute to your final marks. The emphasis shifts further towards seminar work, with individual supervision for extended essays and dissertations.

The core course comprises weekly lectures supplemented by fortnightly seminars in small groups. The Independent Study module has no lectures or seminars but is taught through individual supervisions with academic staff.

Module titleModule codeCredits
Yr Iaith ar WaithCY220520 credits
Module titleModule codeCredits
Sgiliau Academaidd UwchCY221020 credits
Llenyddiaeth PlantCY231020 credits
Ysgrifennu CreadigolCY236020 credits
Bywydau LlênCY242520 credits
TafodieithegCY245020 credits
SosioieithyddiaethCY253020 credits
Treftadaeth a ThwristiaethCY266520 credits
Digital Games and the Practice of HistoryHS160230 credits
Making Modern AfricaHS160330 credits
Modern France, 1789 to the presentHS160530 credits
Approaches to HistoryHS170130 credits
Exploring Historical DebateHS170230 credits
Entangled Histories: Wales and the wider World, 1714 - 1858HS170330 credits
War, Peace and Diplomacy, c.900-c.1250HS170730 credits
Reformation and Revolution: Stuart Britain, 1603-1714HS172130 credits
Blood and Honour: the Viking Age in the WestHS172330 credits
The British Civil Wars and Revolution, c.1638-1649HS174230 credits
A Great Leap Forward China Transformed, 1840-presentHS175230 credits
Europe between the two World WarsHS175330 credits
From King Coal to Cool Cymru: Society and Culture in Wales, 1939-2000HS175630 credits
"An Empire for Liberty": Race, Space and Power in the United States, 1775-1898HS176030 credits
Urban Visions, Rural Dreams: City and Country in Britain and the United States, 1850-2000HS176430 credits
India and The Raj, 1857-1947HS176530 credits
The Search for an Asian Modern: Japanese History from 1800 to the Post-War EraHS176830 credits
Belonging in early modern Europe: identity, community and cultureHS176930 credits
Martyrs and Collaborators: Catholicism behind the Iron CurtainHS177230 credits
Europe, East and West, 1945-1995HS177530 credits
The Soviet Century: Russia and the Soviet Union, 1905-1991HS177630 credits
A global history of riversHS179430 credits

Year three

You will take 60 credits in Welsh and 60 credits in History.

In Welsh it is compulsory to choose one of the following modules:

  • Blas ar Ymchwil [Research Taster]
  • Ymchwilio Estynedig [Extended Research]

You have a choice of an essay or project of 5,000 words (20 credits) or 9,000 words (40 credits), to be completed under the direction of a member of staff who is an expert in the relevant field. This may lead to further research or provide an effective showcase for potential employers. You will also choose more optional modules.

In History, progression is evident in the growing emphasis on lengthier, independent work. You will study the compulsory dissertation module, taught through individual supervisions with an academic adviser, as well as three optional modules.

Module titleModule codeCredits
Llenyddiaeth PlantCY331020 credits
Ysgrifennu CreadigolCY336020 credits
Bywydau LlênCY342520 credits
TafodieithegCY345020 credits
SosioieithyddiaethCY353020 credits
Yr Ystafell DdosbarthCY366020 credits
Treftadaeth a ThwristiaethCY366520 credits
Cyfieithu ProffesiynolCY370520 credits
Blas ar YmchwilCY390020 credits
Ymchwilio EstynedigCY390540 credits
DissertationHS180130 credits
Ridicule, Republics, Revolutions: The (Awkward) Enlightenment in EnglandHS180230 credits
The World of the Anglo-Saxons, c.500-c.1087HS180330 credits
Kingship: Image and Power, c.1000-1399HS181330 credits
City Lives: Urban Culture and Society, c.1550-1750HS182630 credits
Deviants, Rebels and Witches in Early Modern Britain and IrelandHS182830 credits
Germany's New Order in Europe, 1933-1945HS183230 credits
Conflict, Coercion and Mass Mobilisation in Republican China 1911-1945HS183830 credits
Fascism and Anti-Fascism in FranceHS184830 credits
Race, Sex and Empire: Britain and India, 1765-1929HS185530 credits
Cymru, y Mudiad Diwygio a Chwyldro Ffrengig 1789HS185730 credits
Glimpses of the Unfamiliar: Travellers to Japan from 1860 to the Post-War EraHS185830 credits
Remembering the Holocaust in Germany: Coming to Terms with the Past?HS186430 credits
Class, Protest and Politics: South Wales, 1918-39HS186830 credits
Health and Medicine in Early Modern BritainHS187530 credits
Violence and Ideology in Inter-War Soviet RussiaHS188330 credits
Czechoslovakia: The View from Central EuropeHS188430 credits
Europe and the Revolutionary Tradition in the Long Nineteenth CenturyHS188730 credits
Slavery and Slave Life in North America, 1619-1865HS189030 credits
The Dangerous City? Urban Society and Culture, 1800-1914HS189630 credits
The Arts in War and Peace: Culture and Politics in Britain, c.1930-1960HS189730 credits

The University is committed to providing a wide range of module options where possible, but please be aware that whilst every effort is made to offer choice this may be limited in certain circumstances. This is due to the fact that some modules have limited numbers of places available, which are allocated on a first-come, first-served basis, while others have minimum student numbers required before they will run, to ensure that an appropriate quality of education can be delivered; some modules require students to have already taken particular subjects, and others are core or required on the programme you are taking. Modules may also be limited due to timetable clashes, and although the University works to minimise disruption to choice, we advise you to seek advice from the relevant School on the module choices available.

Learning and assessment

We offer a supportive learning environment, where you are enabled to acquire a range of skills and a wealth of specialist knowledge. Our courses foster intellectual skills, such as critical thinking, close analysis, evaluating evidence, constructing arguments, using theory and the effective deployment of language in writing and in debate. We also help you gain experience in team working, independent research and time management.

You will be taught both by lecture and seminar. Lectures provide an overview of the key concepts and frameworks for a topic, equipping you to carry out independent research for the seminars and to develop your own ideas. Seminars provide an opportunity for you to explore the ideas outlined in the lectures.

Seminars usually consist of about 15 students and the seminar leader (a member of the teaching team). Seminars may take various formats, including plenary group discussion, small-group work and student-led presentations. For Welsh, there is also an important role to be played by tutorials, workshops and language classes (especially for students following the second language route).

Year 1

Scheduled learning and teaching activities

27%

Guided independent study

73%

Placements

0%

Year 2

Scheduled learning and teaching activities

17%

Guided independent study

81%

Placements

2%

Year 3

Scheduled learning and teaching activities

13%

Guided independent study

87%

Placements

0%

How will I be supported?

As well as having regular feedback from your personal tutor in each course, you will have a reading week each semester for guided study and a chance to catch up on assessed work, reading and revision. These weeks are also used by staff to visit students on their year abroad.

You will have access through the Learning Central website to relevant multimedia material, presentations, lecture handouts, bibliographies, further links, electronic exercises and discussion circles.

The University offers a range of services including the Careers Service, the Counselling Service, the Disability and Dyslexia Service, the Student Support Service, and excellent libraries and resource centres.

Feedback

We’ll provide you with frequent feedback on your work. This comes in a variety of formats including oral feedback during tutorials, personalised feedback on written work, feedback in lectures and seminars, generic written feedback and feedback on tutorial performance.

Coursework will be marked by your module tutor and your tutor will give you written feedback on your work. You will also have a feedback class after each assessment. Students will be given general feedback in relation to examinations following the May/June examination period and you will be able to discuss your overall performance with your personal tutor as part of the monitored student self-assessment scheme.

Year 1

Written exams

27%

Practical exams

8%

Coursework

65%

Year 2

Written exams

33%

Practical exams

10%

Coursework

58%

Year 3

Written exams

33%

Practical exams

7%

Coursework

60%

What skills will I practise and develop?

As a result of engaging fully with this course, you will acquire and develop a range of valuable skills, both those which are discipline specific and more generic ‘employability skills’. These will allow you to:

  • grasp complex issues with confidence
  • ask the right questions of complex texts
  • have an imaginative appreciation of different views and options and analyse these critically
  • identify and apply relevant data
  • develop practical research skills
  • propose imaginative solutions of your own that are rooted in evidence
  • communicate clearly, concisely and persuasively in writing and speech
  • work to deadlines and priorities, managing a range of tasks at the same time
  • learn from constructive criticism and incorporate its insights
  • work as part of a team, developing a collaborative approach to problem-solving
  • use IT programmes and digital media, where appropriate
  • take responsibility for your own learning programme and professional development

Careers and placements

Career prospects

The demand for Welsh speakers means that a degree in Welsh can be highly valuable for jobs and roles that require bilingual speakers. Many of our graduates are now following careers in areas such as law, politics, media, performing arts, administration and education, or engaged in postgraduate study.

We organise interactive workshops with the Careers Service to help students identify their skills and attributes. History graduates find work in a wide range of related and non-related professional employment. Some choose to undertake postgraduate study at Cardiff or elsewhere, and some have become internationally reputed historians.

In 2016/17, 91% of the School of Welsh’s graduates who were available for work reported they were in employment and/or further study within six months of graduating, while 94% of graduates from the School of History, Archaeology and Religion who were available for work reported they were in employment and/or further study within six months of graduation.

Placements

Year two includes a period of work experience in a workplace in which Welsh is used on a daily basis. This period of work experience is part of a programme of events designed to focus on developing employability and career skills.

The School of History, Archaeology and Religion also has a dedicated Work Placements Officer who supports students with work experience opportunities both in and out of term time.

Studying in Welsh

Up to 56% of this course is available through the medium of Welsh. Please contact the Admissions tutor for more information.

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