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English Literature and Creative Writing (BA) Part time

Entry year


The BA English Literature and Creative Writing programme allows you to study all periods of literature in English, from the Anglo-Saxon period to the twenty-first century, together with training in Creative Writing.

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Course overview

Our BA English Literature and Creative Writing programme allows you to study all periods of literature in English, from the Anglo-Saxon period to the twenty-first century, together with training in Creative Writing. We cover all genres, from contemporary and historical fiction to poetry, drama, film and music.

The Creative Writing element of the programme provides you with the opportunity to progress from introductory modules on reading and writing creatively to specialised work within specific forms and genres such as fiction, poetry, creative non-fiction and scriptwriting, culminating in the production of an extended collection of creative work.

Throughout the programme you will be encouraged to stretch yourself intellectually and imaginatively by exploring literature as both a practitioner and a critic. Our approach will help you develop an understanding of the creative process, as well as enhancing your knowledge of genre, literary history, and the varied and dynamic academic field which is English Literature.

You will focus on becoming a careful, attentive, and informed reader and writer, sensitive to the nuances of language and style and able to produce polished and sophisticated creative work, as well as to articulate your responses to texts in writing which is precise, stylish, and effective. 

You join a friendly and supportive environment with an international reputation for both teaching and research. Our talented Creative Writing team regularly scoop national and international awards, and collectively share experience in theatre, television and film. Our public platforms Cardiff BookTalk and Cardiff Poetry Experiment are popular and hugely engaging.

Distinctive features

  • Emphasis on combining the critical study of literary texts with the practice of writing creatively.
  • The ability to tailor module options towards your own creative interests.
  • Opportunities to take advantage of the creative aspects of our Engagement Platforms - Cardiff BookTalk, Cardiff Poetry Experiment, Fiction Fiesta.
  • MA guest reader performances that are an established part of the creative-critical environment in the School.
  • The opportunity to participate in a lively and thriving literary community and learn from a wide array of practitioners of contemporary literature.

Applying for 2019 or 2020

UCAS codeDirect entry
Next intakeSeptember 2020
Duration6 years
ModePart time
Typical places availableThe School of English, Communication and Philosophy typically has 350 places available.
Typical applications receivedThe School of English, Communication and Philosophy typically receives 1450 applications for full-time and part-time study.

Entry requirements

ABB, including an A in English Literature or English Literature and Language or Creative Writing. Please note: General Studies and Critical Thinking are not accepted.

Extended Project Qualification: Applicants with grade A in the EPQ will typically receive an offer one grade lower than the standard A level offer. Please note that any subject specific requirements must still be met.

The Welsh Baccalaureate Advanced Skills Challenge Certificate will be accepted in lieu of one A-Level (at the grades listed above), excluding any specified subjects.

The Welsh Baccalaureate Advanced Skills Challenge Certificate will be accepted in lieu of one A-Level (at the grades listed above), excluding any specified subjects.

36 points, including 6,6,5 in Higher Level subjects to include English Literature.

Alternative qualifications may be accepted. For further information on entry requirements, see the School of English, Communication & Philosophy admissions criteria pages.

GCSE

Grade C or grade 4 in GCSE English Language.

IELTS (academic)

At least 6.5 overall with a minimum of 5.5 in each subskill.

TOEFL iBT

At least 90 overall with minimum scores of 17 for writing, 17 for listening, 18 for reading and 20 for speaking.

PTE Academic

At least 62 overall with a minimum of 51 in all communicative skills.

Trinity ISE II/III

II: at least two Distinctions and two Merits.
III: at least a Pass in all components.

Other accepted qualifications

Please visit our English Language requirements page for more information on our other accepted language qualifications.

You will require GCSE English or Welsh Language at grade C or grade 4. Alternatively, IGCSE English First Language or English Second Language will be considered at grade C.  Applications from those offering alternative qualifications are welcome. 

Tuition fees

UK and EU students (2020/21)

Tuition feeDeposit
£3,500None

Visit our tuition fee pages for the latest information.

Financial support may be available to individuals who meet certain criteria. For more information visit our funding section. Please note that these sources of financial support are limited and therefore not everyone who meets the criteria are guaranteed to receive the support.

Students from outside the EU (2020/21)

Tuition feeDeposit
£8,850None

Visit our tuition fee pages for the latest information.

Financial support may be available to individuals who meet certain criteria. For more information visit our funding section. Please note that these sources of financial support are limited and therefore not everyone who meets the criteria are guaranteed to receive the support.

Additional costs

Accommodation

We have a range of residences to suit your needs and budget. Find out more on our accommodation pages.

Course structure

In each year of the Programme, you will take Modules to the value of 60 credits. The programme is offered in part-time mode over six academic years.  360 credits are studied (normally 60 credits per year).

You must pass each academic year before proceeding to the next stage of your studies. The classification of your degree is based on the grades you achieve in the Modules that you take in years three to six.

The modules shown are an example of the typical curriculum and will be reviewed prior to the 2020/21 academic year. The final modules will be published by September 2020.

Year one

Year one and year two are foundation years, designed to equip you with the skills and practice for advanced study and to give you an overview that will enable you to make informed choices from the modules available in years three to six while laying down the foundations of your engagement with Creative Writing.

You will take three compulsory 20-credit modules in year one. These will provide you with a solid base for the next five years of your degree by offering the opportunity to develop your critical and creative skills through reading, analysing and producing imaginative work across a wide array of different genres.

Module titleModule codeCredits
Creative ReadingSE214420 credits
Creative WritingSE214520 credits
Critical Reading and Critical WritingSE214620 credits

Year two

In year two, you will take three modules amounting to 60 credits, choosing from the range of options available.

Year three

In year three you will take two modules in Creative Writing, continuing your studies within a variety of forms and genres, including fiction, poetry and scriptwriting. You will also select from a range of period-, genre- or theme-based modules in English Literature, building on the foundation year, reading a selection of texts in their historical and cultural contexts.

Module titleModule codeCredits
Style and GenreSE141620 credits
The Robin Hood TraditionSE236720 credits
Modernist FictionsSE244520 credits
Children's Literature: Form and FunctionSE244720 credits
Introduction to Romantic PoetrySE245020 credits
African-American LiteratureSE245120 credits
Modernism and the CitySE246320 credits
Gothic Fiction: The Romantic AgeSE246820 credits
Social Politics and National Style: American Fiction and Form, 1920-1940SE247020 credits
Literature and ScienceSE247120 credits
Dickens in Many MediaSE247220 credits
Seventeenth and Eighteenth Century Women WritersSE247620 credits
Shakespeare's Tragedies and HistoriesSE247720 credits
Contemporary Poetry: Tradition and InnovationSE248120 credits
GirlsSE248220 credits
Creative Writing: Children's and Young Adult FictionSE248320 credits
Creative Writing: Experiments in FictionSE248420 credits
Creative Writing: MicrofictionSE248620 credits
Creative Writing: Poetry lSE248720 credits
Creative Writing: Playwriting - Stage and RadioSE248820 credits
Creative Writing: ScreenwritingSE248920 credits
Creative Writing: Poetry IISE249020 credits
Creative Writing: The Short StorySE249120 credits
Object Women in Literature and FilmSE249420 credits
Renaissance Poetry, Prose and Drama: The Principal Genres, Issues and AuthorsSE249720 credits
Decadent Men, 1890s-1910s: Wilde to ForsterSE249820 credits
Creative Writing: Stories from the Real World -- NarrativeSE249920 credits
Chaucer's Gender Politics: Chivalry, Sex and Subversion in the Canterbury TalesSE261820 credits
Contemporary British FictionsSE261920 credits
Experimental Early Modern DramaSE262020 credits
Writing MourningSE262120 credits
Philosophy and LiteratureSE262320 credits
Jane Austen in ContextSE262520 credits
ENCAP Employability ModuleSE625520 credits

Year four

In year four you will take modules amounting to 60 credits, choosing from the range of options available.

Module titleModule codeCredits
Style and GenreSE141620 credits
The Robin Hood TraditionSE236720 credits
Modernist FictionsSE244520 credits
Children's Literature: Form and FunctionSE244720 credits
Introduction to Romantic PoetrySE245020 credits
African-American LiteratureSE245120 credits
Modernism and the CitySE246320 credits
Gothic Fiction: The Romantic AgeSE246820 credits
Social Politics and National Style: American Fiction and Form, 1920-1940SE247020 credits
Literature and ScienceSE247120 credits
Dickens in Many MediaSE247220 credits
Seventeenth and Eighteenth Century Women WritersSE247620 credits
Shakespeare's Tragedies and HistoriesSE247720 credits
Contemporary Poetry: Tradition and InnovationSE248120 credits
GirlsSE248220 credits
Creative Writing: Children's and Young Adult FictionSE248320 credits
Creative Writing: Experiments in FictionSE248420 credits
Creative Writing: MicrofictionSE248620 credits
Creative Writing: Poetry lSE248720 credits
Creative Writing: Playwriting - Stage and RadioSE248820 credits
Creative Writing: ScreenwritingSE248920 credits
Creative Writing: Poetry IISE249020 credits
Creative Writing: The Short StorySE249120 credits
Object Women in Literature and FilmSE249420 credits
Renaissance Poetry, Prose and Drama: The Principal Genres, Issues and AuthorsSE249720 credits
Decadent Men, 1890s-1910s: Wilde to ForsterSE249820 credits
Creative Writing: Stories from the Real World -- NarrativeSE249920 credits
Chaucer's Gender Politics: Chivalry, Sex and Subversion in the Canterbury TalesSE261820 credits
Contemporary British FictionsSE261920 credits
Experimental Early Modern DramaSE262020 credits
Writing MourningSE262120 credits
Philosophy and LiteratureSE262320 credits
Jane Austen in ContextSE262520 credits
ENCAP Employability ModuleSE625520 credits

Year five

In years five and six you will choose from a range of more specialised modules, allowing you to pursue interests developed in the previous four years. You will engage with current issues in research and scholarship, enabling you further to develop analytical and presentation skills that employers will value, as well as equipping you for postgraduate study.

In either year five or year six you will also undertake a portfolio dissertation in Creative Writing that complements your work in the English Literature modules and allows you to produce an extended piece of writing in a specialist genre. The dissertation also allows you to develop research and project management skills.

Year six

In year six you will take modules amounting to 60 credits. This may include the compulsory 40-credit Creative Writing portfolio dissertation, if you did not choose to take it in year five. As in year five, the range of optional modules will allow you to pursue interests developed in the previous five years.

The University is committed to providing a wide range of module options where possible, but please be aware that whilst every effort is made to offer choice this may be limited in certain circumstances. This is due to the fact that some modules have limited numbers of places available, which are allocated on a first-come, first-served basis, while others have minimum student numbers required before they will run, to ensure that an appropriate quality of education can be delivered; some modules require students to have already taken particular subjects, and others are core or required on the programme you are taking. Modules may also be limited due to timetable clashes, and although the University works to minimise disruption to choice, we advise you to seek advice from the relevant School on the module choices available.

Learning and assessment

How will I be taught?

You will be taught through a combination of lectures and seminars, with all modules including seminar or small-group teaching. In Creative Writing the small-group teaching takes the form of workshops based on peer review of student writing.

Teaching stresses the importance of the way texts interact with their contexts, and each module is designed to encourage you to focus on a number of specific texts and to prepare carefully a considered answer to specific topics dealt with in the module, while the workshops in Creative Writing ask you to engage with the critical creative process through evaluative discussion of peer writing.

Learning activities will vary from module to module as appropriate, but may include such activities as: interactive lectures, seminar discussions of prepared texts/topics, student individual or group presentations, small-group work within seminars, peer review in workshops, translation classes, formative writing exercises, journal entries, and film viewings.

You are expected to do the reading and other relevant preparation to enable you to participate fully in these activities. You are encouraged to explore the resources of the library as appropriate. For the workshops, peer work is previously circulated and you are expected to bring prepared comments as part of the exchange of ideas informing the sessions.

How will I be supported?

You will be assigned a personal tutor and will meet him/her for regular academic progress meetings (one per semester). There is a form to fill in before each Academic Progress meeting which is designed to help you reflect on the written feedback and the reasons for the marks you have received from the previous round of assessment. You will discuss this feedback and your reflections on it with your personal tutor.

In addition, all staff have weekly office hours during teaching weeks and you may make appointments to see your personal tutor or module leaders on a one-to-one basis about any issues. Staff may also be contacted by email.

Key information for each module will be available on our Virtual Learning Environment, Learning Central, together with appropriate additional learning resources, such as lecture notes and slides.

The University offers a range of services including the Careers Service, the Counselling Service, the Disability and Dyslexia Service, the Student Support Service, and excellent libraries and resource centres.

Feedback

Written feedback is provided on both formative and summative assessment and you are encouraged to discuss your ideas with module tutors in seminars and, where appropriate, on a one-to-one basis in office hours.

Your achievement and progress are also discussed in regular progress meetings with personal tutors.

How will I be assessed?

All English Literature modules offer you the opportunity to undertake unassessed formative work appropriate to the module. Most modules are assessed by essay and/or examination, but some include other forms of assessment such as journal entries, a portfolio, or presentations.

Creative Writing modules are assessed by short portfolios of creative work that include a critical commentary. The assessment strategy is structured to lead you from formative thinking throughout the module towards the production of an informed critical/creative response.

Your final year project consists of a substantial, independently-researched and original portfolio of creative work, produced under the guidance of a member of staff, in the field of fiction, creative non-fiction, poetry, playwriting, or screenwriting. The portfolio includes a critical commentary on the work produced.

What skills will I practise and develop?

Knowledge and understanding

  • Awareness of different literary periods, movements and genres and of the variety of English literature.
  • Understanding of the importance of historical and cultural contexts.
  • Ability to sustain a critical argument that is responsive to the workings of language and literary styles.
  • Awareness of the bibliographic conventions of the discipline and their role in communicating information.
  • Knowledge of the critical issues and/or debates surrounding or raised by texts.
  • Understanding of the shaping effects of historical and cultural circumstances on the production and meaning of texts.
  • Knowledge of appropriate critical vocabulary and terminology.
  • An awareness of editorial approaches and processes.
  • Understanding, through reading and your own practice, of the key elements of different forms of writing.
  • Ability to produce original literary work in a variety of forms and genres.
  • An awareness of tone, register, structure, genre and audience in your own writing.

Intellectual skills

  • Ability to handle complex ideas with clarity.
  • Ability to analyse and interpret material drawn from a diversity of literary periods.
  • Ability to apply high level critical skills of close analysis to literary texts.
  • Ability to select and organise material purposefully and cogently.
  • Ability to use the views of others in the development and enhancement of practice; formulate considered practical responses to the critical judgements of others, while developing a generous yet rigorous critical scrutiny in peer review and workshop activities.

Professional Practical Skills

  • Advanced communication skills (written and oral).
  • Ability to give an efficient critical evaluation of documents in various styles.
  • Ability to give oral and written feedback on others’ work.
  • Ability to access, use and evaluate electronic data.
  • Ability to interact effectively with others, in team or group work situations.

Transferable skills

  • Ability to handle complex ideas with clarity.
  • Ability to select and organise material purposefully and cogently.
  • Plan, organize, and deliver work to a deadline.
  • Initiate and take responsibility for independent projects.
  • Respond creatively and imaginatively to research tasks.

 

 

Careers and placements

Career prospects

Our graduates commonly go on to pursue careers in freelance writing, academia, teaching, publishing, arts management and administration, public relations and journalism.

Many employers welcome graduates with high-level literacy skills. Together with such skills, our students develop the kind of insights into the creative process that are valued by business, from design to sales.

Imaginative writing transfers readily into advertising and tourism as well as advertising companies. As a graduate of our School you will have a portfolio of creative writing to demonstrate to potential employers.

Our graduates transfer readily into HR, the book trade, professional areas such as librarianship but also local government and other areas of public life concerned with communication.

Placements

We have an established portfolio of internships with Wales-based literary/cultural magazines for which students can apply. 

You may also apply for exchanges with the range of University partners through the University’s Global Opportunities Centre.

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Next Undergraduate Open Day

Spring 2020

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Applying for 2018 or 2019