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Clinical Geriatrics

These e-learning modules offer Continuing Professional Development (CPD) education to professionals, from a range of health and social care settings the opportunity to explore the complex health and social needs of older people living in today’s society.

All modules can be studied individually as part of your continuing professional development portfolio as part of the MSc Clinical Geriatrics.

The standalone modules provide flexibility in that some are 10 credits and other are 20 credit Level 7 modules. Please see the distribution of these below. They are all delivered by a core team of clinical experts via our digital learning platform, Learning Central Ultra. You will be supported and helped with navigating though the content and activities held on this platform by the team.

Please refer to the course pages for full details of each of the modules.

The aim of this module is to provide students with a critical appreciation of key biological, social, ethical, demographic, economic and psycho-social aspects of ageing together with an assessment of their relevance and the implications for work with older people.

On completion of this 20 credit module, students should be able to:

  • reflect upon the biological basis and physiological aspects of the ageing process.
  • critically assess the biological determinants, causation, and potential control of age related disease.
  • systematically analyse demographic, economic and psycho-social factors that influence the care of older adults and their experience of ageing.
  • investigate societal attitudes and predominant preconceptions with respect to ageing and older people.
  • interpret psychological theories relating to ageing and its perception.
  • critically evaluate complex issues in gerontology such as the economics and financial implications of ageing in relation to health and social care.
  • articulate the social and ethical aspects of ageing.
  • apply appropriate models of ethical decision-making to the analysis of major ethical issues in relation to ageing, health and society.

Module dates

3rd October - 12th December 2022

The module will offer you the opportunity to explore the influence of normal and abnormal health on pathological process and disease presentation. It will also enable you to critically evaluate the evidence base behind the common physical and mental illnesses encountered in older individuals, in order to synthesise outcomes to practice.

On completion of this 20 credit module, students should be able to:

  • reflect on the presentation of disease in old age and the multidimensional nature of ill health in older adults.
  • conduct multidimensional assessments that appropriately inform the diagnosis and management of disease in the elderly.
  • formulate and evaluate integrated and interdisciplinary care plans for the rehabilitation of older people who are ill.
  • critically evaluate the assessment and management of patients with wounds and pressure sores.
  • critically appraise the concept of ‘Geriatric Giants’ in the assessment and management of older people with physical health problems.
  • accurately identify significant differences between normal and abnormal mental health in older people.
  • debate different approaches to assessment and diagnosis of common mental health problems in older people.
  • critically appraise approaches to meeting the needs of older people with mental health problems.

Module dates

12th December 2022 - 13th March 2023

This module provides an introduction to research methods and their application to health provision and improvement using an evidence-based approach. Research will be distinguished from audit, service development, service evaluation and innovation, and the relationships between and amongst these activities will be explored.  This will provide you with an advanced understanding of various methods to research and evaluate health care which will be the basis of your learning throughout the programme. The module will provide an overview of the structure of a research project as well as project management methods. Overall approaches and methods for data collection and analysis in quantitative and qualitative research paradigms and systematic reviews will be covered, as well as their application to health and social care of older people. There is a very strong emphasis on the development and application of critical evaluation, including critical analysis, reflection and synthesis to practice, throughout the module.

On completion of this 20 credit module, students should be able to:

  • identify and critically review the different research methods (both qualitative and quantitative research), that are and can be used within health care, reflecting on appropriate methods to address clinically meaningful questions;
  • undertake robust search strategies to reduce bias in academic writing when identifying appropriate literature to answer clinically orientated questions;
  • evaluate literature critically and reflect on implications for practice using appropriate methods for evaluating qualitative and quantitative research;
  • debate appropriate data collection methods and Integrate statistical principles in analysing data; being able to delineate the appropriate methods to use for differing data sets;
  • reflect on and synthesise research findings, to clinical practice.
  • critically evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of research, service evaluation and clinical audit in order to reflect on how these can improve patient care, promote innovation and improve service delivery.
  • reflect on current ethical and governance frameworks and processes applied to the conduct of research with human subjects, service evaluation and clinical audit.
  • critique the concept of evidence-based practice, methods for development of clinical guidelines, and the role of current statutory and advisory regulatory bodies governing health care.

Module dates

13th March - 5th June 2023

This module offers you the opportunity to consider how the particular needs of older people can be met across the range of service/care sectors. You will be expected to investigate and reflect on how the different factors (historical, social, political, and ideological) have influenced care provision for older people.

You will be engaged in various approaches to management and leadership that are directly relevant to healthcare and will work in teams using the learning relating to group theory as part of the module.

On completion of this 20 credit module, students should be able to:

  • reflect on the particular needs of older people and the ways in which these should influence the provision and establishment of services and care.
  • critically evaluate the current and historical models for the delivery and organisation of care and the types of care provision for older people.
  • synthesise publicly available data relevant to the planning and evaluation of services and care for the elderly.
  • select appropriate methods for monitoring the quality of care for older people.
  • assess the standards of the quality of care delivered in a service for older people
  • contrast different types of leadership and models of organisational change.
  • debate the importance of personality dynamics in team working.
  • summarise and effectively communicate specific aspects of service planning for older people to a particular target audience.

Module dates

Running in the 2023/4 academic year - dates to be confirmed.

Through this module, you will explore the scientific and clinical background to dementia in older people (Alzheimer’s disease, vascular dementia and the rarer subtypes) and consider practical issues related to comprehensive management. Beyond dementia, reflection on the wider psychiatric illnesses in the older person, will be undertaken. For example, depression, anxiety and psychoses.

On completion of this 20 credit module, students should be able to:

  • evaluate the main dementing and psychiatric diseases affecting older people based on their incidence, occurrence patterns, risk, severity and their impact on patients and their carers.
  • reflect on the scientific basis of dementia occurring in old age.
  • Critically analyse the differential diagnosis, diagnostic criteria, treatment options and alternative care provision available for people with dementia and psychiatric disease.
  • review the evidence and synthesis to clinical practice how the most frequently encountered dementias and psychiatric diseases in old age present and progress.
  • evaluate the role of carers in the choices and delivery of treatment options and alternative care plans, demonstrating awareness of carers’ needs for education and support.
  • critically evaluate the practical issues related to good care of people with dementia conditions, taking into account issues including personhood, quality of life, and support for patients, carers and family.
  • defend and critique current policies and service development relating to dementia and psychiatric diseases in old age and likely future therapeutic interventions.

Module dates

Running in the 2023/4 academic year - dates to be confirmed.

The module will offer you the opportunity to critically evaluate the development, assessment and management of older people living with frailty.

On completion of this 20 credit module, students should be able to:

  • reflect on the differences between normal ageing and frailty, evaluating the role and importance of sarcopenia within the concept of the frail older adult
  • evaluate the aetiology, pathology and epidemiology of frailty and the increasing importance of frailty in the modern health care system.
  • critically review the concepts of inflam-aging, reduced immunosenesence and reduced microbiota diversity interact to cause the development of frailty
  • evaluate the markers of frailty, and synthesise their usefulness in assessment of the health and perceived risk of adverse outcomes to practice
  • assess and formulate an integrated and interdisciplinary care plan for the management of older people living with frailty, based on sound analysis of current literature, reflection on the strength of evidence and patient and lay carer needs.
  • reflect upon the increasing geopolitical importance of frailty and its relevance to the recent pandemic and the relevance of frailty in non-first world countries.

Module dates

Running in the 2023/4 academic year - dates to be confirmed.

The module will offer you the opportunity to explore the assessment, management and evaluation of people (and their carers) affected by stroke and understand the implications for, and management of, the resulting disability and handicap.

On completion of this 20 credit module, students should be able to:

  • evaluate the pathologic mechanisms and epidemiology associated with the development of stroke.
  • critically review the differential diagnosis of stroke, assessing the likelihood of other possibilities.
  • critically evaluate of the importance of pathology and epidemiology in developing a management plan.
  • review the importance of vascular risk factors associated with stroke, synthesising these to inform practice.
  • critically analyse the evidence in order to develop a vascular risk prevention strategy.
  • reflect on the clinical assessment and formulate an integrated and interdisciplinary care plan for the management of stroke, based on sound analysis of current literature, reflection on the strength of evidence and patient and lay carer needs.
  • critically evaluate the various models used for the organisation of stroke care.

Module dates

Running in the 2023/4 academic year - dates to be confirmed.

This module will consider continence and enable you to reflect on both urinary and faecal incontinence and the association with anatomical and physiological impacts of ageing. You will critically review the approaches to assessing and managing incontinence, and the associated sequelae and the role of specialist healthcare providers in supporting care.

On completion of this 10 credit module, students should be able to:

  • reflect on the anatomical and physiological impact of ageing on structures and functions of the genitourinary and gastro-intestinal tracts.
  • reflect on the various types of incontinence, the aetiology and associated investigations required
  • critically review contemporaneous evidence to support the clinical management of incontinence (urinary and faecal) and synthesise the strongest evidence to inform practice
  • review the physical, mental and social sequelae and the long-term implications of incontinence on the individual
  • reflect on the role of specialist healthcare providers in supporting care and the long-term implications for the wider health and social services

Module dates

Running in the 2023/4 academic year - dates to be confirmed.

This module will allow you to explore the scientific and clinical background to delirium. Delirium subtypes (hypo and hyperactive) and clinical trajectory will be reflected upon. The pathophysiology and emerging links to subsequent dementia will be critically appraised. You will be able to consider the practical issues related to comprehensive management, especially in the context of a multidisciplinary approach.

On completion of this 10 credit module, students should be able to:

  • categorise delirium, specifically subtypes and clinical trajectory of people based on their incidence, occurrence patterns, risk, severity and synthesise the impact of these on patients and their carers.
  • reflect on the scientific basis of delirium.
  • critically analyse the differential diagnosis, diagnostic criteria, treatment options and alternative care provision available for people with delirium and its influence in the development of subsequent incident dementia
  • evaluate the role of carers in the choices and delivery of treatment options and alternative care plans, demonstrating awareness of carers’ needs for education and support.
  • critically evaluate the practical issues related to good multidisciplinary care of people with delirium and both pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatment options.

Module dates

Running in the 2023/4 academic year - dates to be confirmed.

The module will offer you the opportunity to explore the assessment, management and evaluation of individuals who have problems associated with bone, joints, and falls.

On completion of this 10 credit module, students should be able to:

  • reflect on the age-related changes in bone and joints and the importance of how these influence pathology, disease presentation and patient care.
  • evaluate the evidence to consider the aetiology, pathology and epidemiology of osteoporosis and the importance of these factors in developing management plans and prevention strategies.
  • critically analyse contemporaneous evidence to assess and formulate an integrated and interdisciplinary care plan for the management for older adults with bone and joint disease, particularly osteoporosis and arthritis, reflecting on the strength of evidence and patient and lay carer needs.
  • critically evaluate the common approaches to the assessment and management of trauma in the older population, especially with reference to hip fracture.
  • evaluate the epidemiology, causes and management of falls in the elderly using literature that has been critically reviewed.
  • assess and formulate an integrated and interdisciplinary care plan for the management of older people suffering from falls, based on sound analysis of current literature, reflection on the strength of evidence and patient and lay carer needs.

Module dates

Running in the 2023/4 academic year - dates to be confirmed.

This module will enable you to explore the scientific and clinical background to movement disorders in older people, typically Parkinson’s disease, but also less common movement disorders and to consider practical issues related to comprehensive management and support for family and carers.

On completion of this 10 credit module, students should be able to:

  • categorise the main movement disorders affecting older people based on their incidence, occurrence patterns, risk, severity and their impact on patients and their carers.
  • reflect on the scientific basis of movement occurring in old age.
  • critically analyse the evidence on the differential diagnosis, diagnostic criteria, treatment options and alternative care provision available for people with Parkinsonism.
  • reflect on the presentation and progression of the most frequently encountered movement disorders in old age and contrast this with younger people.
  • evaluate the role of carers in the choices and delivery of treatment options and alternative care plans, demonstrating awareness of carers’ needs for education and support.
  • critically evaluate the practical issues related to good care of people with neurodegenerative conditions, taking into account issues including personhood, quality of life, and support for patients, carers and family.

Module dates

Running in the 2023/4 academic year - dates to be confirmed.

We reserve the right to cancel the delivery of a standalone module. This could happen if a course is under-subscribed or if there is a change in circumstances. This is due to the fact that some modules have minimum student numbers required before they can run. This is to ensure that an appropriate quality of education can be delivered. When this happens we will issue a full or partial refund depending on whether any classes took place.

Entry requirements

In addition to satisfying the University’s minimum entry requirements, including English language requirements, applicants must:

  • hold a qualification in a medicine, nursing, or an allied profession (e.g. physiotherapy, dietetics, occupational therapy, social services and other professionals and managers who work with older people)
  • be currently working in a relevant area

Applicants who do not meet the above requirements should contact the Postgraduate Taught Admissions Team, School of Medicine for advice.

How to apply

Please contact our Postgraduate Taught Medical Admissions Team at PGTMedAdmissions@cardiff.ac.uk for details on how to apply.

Funding and fees

Please check our fees pages for tuition fees for these programmes.

Postgraduate Taught Admissions Team

School of Medicine