Dr David Reynolds

Dr David Reynolds

Postdoctoral Research Associate

School of Earth and Ocean Sciences

Email:
reynoldsd3@cardiff.ac.uk
Telephone:
+44 (0)29 2087 0188
Location:
2.53, Main Building, Park Place, Cardiff, CF10 3AT

David’s research focuses on the generation and application of high resolution (annual and sub-annual resolution) proxy archives and numeric model outputs to derive a quantitative understanding of the mechanisms and forcings that drive marine and atmospheric climate variability. In particular, he is interested in the role natural forcings and mechanisms/feedbacks (e.g. ocean circulation dynamics, ocean-atmosphere interactions, solar variability and volcanic aerosols) play in driving seasonal to millennial scale climate variability during the Holocene.

David’s current research projects involve the development of millennial length annually resolved absolutely-dated marine sclerochronological records derived from the long-lived marine bivalve molluscs Glycymeris glycymeris and Arctica islandica (growth increment width chronologies and geochemical timeseries [e.g., δ13C, δ18O and 14C]) and the application of multi-proxy and spatial networking techniques in conjunction with integrated proxy model analyses from across the North Atlantic region to better understand the role North Atlantic circulation dynamics play in the global climate system.

 

2015-present: Postdoctoral Research Associate, School of Earth and Ocean Science Cardiff University.

2013-2015: Lecturer Climate System Science, School of Earth and Ocean Science Cardiff University.

2011-2013: Postodctoral Research Officer, School of Ocean Science, Bangor University UK.

2007-2011: PhD in Ocean Science, School of Ocean Science Bangor University.

2004-2007: BSc (hons) Marine Biology, School of Ocean Science Bangor Universit

David’s research focuses on the generation and application of high resolution (annual and sub-annual resolution) proxy archives and numeric model outputs to derive a quantitative understanding of the mechanisms and forcings that drive marine and atmospheric climate variability. In particular, he is interested in the role natural forcings and mechanisms/feedbacks (e.g. ocean circulation dynamics, ocean-atmosphere interactions, solar variability and volcanic aerosols) play in driving seasonal to millennial scale climate variability during the Holocene. 

David’s current research projects involve the development of millennial length annually resolved absolutely-dated marine sclerochronological records derived from the long-lived marine bivalve molluscs Glycymeris glycymeris and Arctica islandica (growth increment width chronologies and geochemical timeseries [e.g., δ13C, δ18O and 14C]) and the application of multi-proxy and spatial networking techniques in conjunction with integrated proxy model analyses from across the North Atlantic region to better understand the role North Atlantic circulation dynamics play in the global climate system.