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Dr Liz Bagshaw

Dr Liz Bagshaw

Lecturer

School of Earth and Ocean Sciences

Email:
bagshawe@cardiff.ac.uk
Telephone:
+44 (0)29 2087 4488
Location:
1.34, Main Building

Interests

  • Glaciology
  • Biogeochemistry
  • Geomicrobiology
  • Sensors
  • Environmental Monitoring
  • Lecturer in Earth and Ocean Sciences, Cardiff University 2014-present
  • Postdoctoral Research Assistant, biogeochemical sensor development and testing, Bristol Glaciology Centre, University of Bristol 2013-2014
  • Postdoctoral Research Assistant, subglacial wireless sensor development and testing, Queens School of Engineering, University of Bristol, 2010-2013
  • Postdoctoral Research Assistant and Lecturer in Glaciology, School of Geographical Sciences, University of Bristol, 2008-2010
  • PhD in Glacial Biogeochemistry, Bristol Glaciology Centre, University of Bristol, 2008
  • MSci in Physical Geography, University of Bristol, 2005

2018

2017

2016

2014

2013

2012

2011

2010

2008

2007

Liz is a glaciologist with particular interest in biogeochemical processes in the cryosphere, and in the development and testing of new technologies to monitor them. She has conducted over ten seasons of fieldwork in Antarctica and Greenland, monitoring the impact of physical processes on microbial communities through geochemical changes in meltwater.

Glacial environments are home to a diverse range of microorganisms, which have a profound impact on surrounding environments via the export of runoff. This impact is poorly quantified, primarily because it is challenging to take measurements in isolated and cold locations.

Liz is interested in new methods for measuring aquatic biogeochemistry in glacial environments, in order to interpret processes and changes occurring in extreme ecosystems. Current projects include: testing of new generation sensors for pH and H2S in glacial runoff; development of wireless sensors for measuring simple parameters in UK rivers and subglacial melt channels; microsensor monitoring of carbon exchange in glacier surface ecosystems.