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Dr Mark Cuthbert

Dr Mark Cuthbert

Research Fellow and Lecturer

School of Earth and Ocean Sciences

Email:
cuthbertm2@cardiff.ac.uk
Telephone:
+44 (0)29 2087 4051
Location:
2.53, Main Building, Park Place, Cardiff, CF10 3AT

My research is currently focussed on coupled hydrological-climate process dynamics in order: to understand & quantify groundwater sustainability, particularly in drylands; to improve interpretations of terrestrial paleoclimate proxy archives; to understand Quaternary paleoenvironments & how they influenced our evolution as a species.

Please get in touch for more information about my research, for copies of papers, or if you are interested in collaborating.

  • Education and qualifications

    • 2006: PhD (Hydrogeology) University of Birmingham, UK
    • 1999: MSc (Hydrogeology & Groundwater Resources), University College London, UK
    • 1998: BA, MA (Earth Sciences), University of Oxford, UK
  • Career overview

    • 2017 - present: NERC Independent Research Fellow & Lecturer, School of Earth & Ocean Sciences, Cardiff University, UK
    • 2017 - 2017: Research Fellow, Water Research Institute, Cardiff University, UK
    • 2016 - 2017: Senior Research Associate, University College London, UK
    • 2014 - 2016: Research Fellow, University of Birmingham, UK
    • 2012 - 2014: Marie Curie Research Fellow: University of New South Wales, Australia
    • 2008 - 2012: Research Fellow, University of Birmingham, UK
    • + 6 years outside academia in Environmental Consultancy & the charitable sector

2019

2018

2017

2016

2015

2014

2013

2012

2011

2010

2009

2007

2002

Climate-Groundwater Interactions and Paleohydrology

How has groundwater availability varied with climate over Earth’s history? How has this influenced the evolution of humans and other species? How will future climate change affect groundwater availability?

A better understanding of climate-groundwater interactions in the past and present is crucial to developing strategies for future human resilience to climate change.

Key papers: Cuthbert et al 2017 Nature Communications; Cuthbert & Ashley 2014 PLOS ONE; Holman et al. 2012 HJ; Acworth.., Cuthbert et al. (2016) HJ

Hydrological Controls on Paleoclimate Proxy Archive Geochemistry

How do features of the water chemistry that are preserved in speleothems vary along a flow path from ‘drop’ (rainfall) to ‘drip’ (cave exfiltration)? How do groundwater inputs to lakes influence the chemistry of lake carbonate deposits?

Improved processes understanding of the links between hydrology, climate and the geochemistry of terrestrial paleoclimate proxy archives in the present, can improve our understanding and models of past climates.

Key papers: Cuthbert et al. 2014 EPSL; Cuthbert et al. 2014 Sci. Rep.; Rau, Cuthbert et al. (2015) QSR; Jones, Cuthbert et al. (2016) QSR

Groundwater recharge

How and why does groundwater recharge occur? How has recharge changed as the climate has varied, and how might it in the future? How can we best estimate groundwater recharge?

Answering these questions is key to developing strategies for sustainable groundwater management, a critical part of meeting our global food-water-energy needs.

Key papers: Cuthbert et al. 2009 QJEG&H; Cuthbert 2010 WRR; Cuthbert et al. 2010a JoH; Cuthbert et al. 2010b JoW&CC; Cuthbert et al. 2013 HESS; Cuthbert et al. 2016 WRR

Surface water-groundwater interactions

What are the fundamental controls on exchange fluxes between surface water and groundwater? How does human activity change these dynamics? How can we best estimate these fluxes?

Such interactions control catchment water quality and hydroecological health and are fundamental for underpinning sound integrated catchment management.

Key papers: Cuthbert et al. 2010 AWR; Cuthbert & Mackay 2013 WRR; Krause et al. 2014 WRR; Roshan et al. 2014 AWR

Groundwater flow and transport processes

What governs the form of groundwater recessions? How can we characterise preferential flow phenomena in porous media? How do bacteria move in the subsurface? How can biomineralisation be used for reducing the spread of groundwater contaminants?

Exploring fundamental groundwater flow and transport processes is critical to managing human impact on the natural environment.

Key papers: Cuthbert 2014 WRR; Cuthbert et al 2013 ES&T; Tobler et al. 2014; Handley-Sidhu et al. 2014