Dr Andreas Aaserud

Dr Andreas Aaserud

Research Associate

School of Mathematics

Research Group

Geometry, Algebra, Mathematical Physics and Topology

Research Interests

Von Neumann algebras, ergodic theory, operator algebraic K-theory, approximately finite (AF) C*-algebras, subfactors

Personal Website

For the time being, Andreas has no personal website.  His papers and preprints can be found on arXiv.

Academic degrees

2016: PhD in Mathematics, UCLA, under Professor Sorin Popa

2011: MSc in Mathematics, University of Copenhagen, under Professor Uffe Haagerup

2009: BSc in Mathematics, University of Copenhagen, under Professor Henrik Schlichtkrull

Biographical Data

Andreas Naes Aaserud was born in New York, USA, on September 10, 1987, to Norwegian parents, but grew up in Copenhagen, Denmark, where he lived until he was accepted into graduate school at UCLA in Los Angeles, USA, in August, 2011.  Since October 2016, he has been a research associate (postdoc) at Cardiff University under the supervision of Professor David E. Evans.

Andreas taught the year 3 mathematics module "Rings and Fields" in the spring semester of 2018.

Prior to this, he was a teaching assistant for a number of classes at the University of Copenhagen and the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), including calculus, linear algebra, real analysis and complex analysis.

Overview of research activities

At UCLA, Andreas’ research focussed on ergodic theory and von Neumann algebras, and especially on the use of von Neumann algebras in studying measure preserving actions of countable discrete groups.  His PhD thesis was titled “Weak and approximate equivalence of group actions in the framework of ultrapower Cartan inclusions” and was based on joint work with his advisor, Professor Sorin Popa, concerning some new notions of equivalence of group actions, namely approximate versions of conjugacy and orbit equivalence that were defined using ultrapowers of von Neumann algebras.  Currently, Andreas is working on a K-theoretical project with Professor David E. Evans inspired by subfactor theory.  His papers and preprints can be found on arXiv.