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Professor Paul Chaney

Professor Paul Chaney

WISERD Co-Director

School of Social Sciences

Email:
chaneyp@cardiff.ac.uk
Telephone:
+44 (0)29 2087 4459
Fax:
+44 (0)29 2087 4175

I am Professor of Policy and Politics at Cardiff University School of Social Sciences. I have been a member of a number of public advisory bodies - including the UK government Steering Group on the Equality and Human Rights Commission. I was a panel member/ special adviser to the RAE (2008) and REF (2010-11).

2018

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2016

2015

2014

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2012

2011

2010

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2000

Undergraduate

  • SI0171 Introduction to Social and Public Policy
  • SI0206 Power, Politics and Policy
  • SI0202 Equality and Diversity in Education and Work

Postgraduate

  • SIT034 Social Policy Masters citizenship
  • SIR056 Public Policy and Administration

Part of ESRC Large Centre Grant £7M ES/L009099/

Project Title: Territoriality and third sector engagement in policymaking and welfare provision.

Aims and objectives of the research in context: Notwithstanding the global trend of devolution and transfer of a broad range of welfare functions to regional governments and legislatures - and the rise of 'welfare pluralism' (Kendall 2000) - whereby the third sector is allocated a key role in service delivery, welfare state theory (Cf. Esping Andersen, 1990) has struggled to come to terms with these processes. To address the resultant knowledge gap this study will: (1). explore the how the territorial administration of the third sector in Wales has changed over the post-war period in response to shifting patterns and processes of governance; and (2). Examine how this has affected the way third sector organisations' shape and deliver welfare.

Research Questions: What are the key historical and spatial patterns and processes associated with third sector (re-)configuration in relation to the changing nature of governance? What are third sector organisations' views and understanding of the inherent issues, progress and challenges of engaging government in welfare policy-making and service delivery? To what extent do meso-structures, institutional procedures and enactments facilitate and/ or frustrate effective third sector engagement in welfare policy-making and delivery? How and to what extent is state decentralisation territorialising policy-making and citizen rights thereby (re-)defining the nature of care extended to different groups under welfare pluralism?