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 Jennifer Keating

Jennifer Keating

Research Associate

School of Healthcare Sciences

Email
keatingj@cardiff.ac.uk
Campuses
13th floor, Eastgate House, 35-43 Newport Road, Cardiff CF24 0AB

Overview

I am a Research Associate working on the Coordination, Movement, and the Brain (CoMB) Study. The CoMB study is investigating the neural correlates of Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD), in particular mirror neuron activity in children with DCD.

My main research interest lies in understanding and identifying factors, such as sleep and family factors, that may impact healthy brain and behaviour development in children. I am also interested in sensory processing difficulties and their impact on child development. My PhD was focused on the early development of children with a family history of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD).  

Biography

Undergraduate education

2017: BA Psychology, University College Dublin (First Class Honours)

Postgraduate education

2020: PhD Psychology, University College Dublin

Employment 

2020-current: Research Associate, School of Healthcare Sciences, Cardiff University 

Honours and awards

  • Shortlisted for Psychological Society of Ireland Division of Neuropsychology Early
    Career Award – November 2019
  • SPARC Public Engagement Funding, UCD – November 2019
  • Seed Funding – Dissemination and Outputs, UCD – April 2019
  • Graduate Research and Innovation Fund, UCD – March 2019
  • Graduate Research and Innovation Fund, UCD – October 2018
  • Travel Award, Guarantors of Brain – May 2018
  • Postgraduate Scholarship in Arts, UCD – March 2018

My current research investigates the neural correlates of Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD). I am using electroencephalography (EEG) to examine mirror neuron system activity in children with DCD. My doctoral research was focused on sensory processing, sleep, and family functioning in infants and young children at familial risk of ADHD. This involved using a variety of methodologies, including EEG, eye-tracking, parent-report measures, and behavioural assessments of children.