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Dr Georgina Klemencic

Dr Georgina Klemencic

Lecturer
Astronomy Instrumentation Group

School of Physics and Astronomy

Email
klemencicg@cardiff.ac.uk
Telephone
+44 (0)29 2082 0197
Campuses
N/3.18, Queen's Buildings - North Building, 5 The Parade, Newport Road, Cardiff, CF24 3AA

Overview

I am currently Disglair Lecturer in Astronomy Instrumentation. My cross-disciplinary research draws on developments in condensed matter physics at low temperatures and transfers them to applications that range from astronomical telescopes to quantum computation. My most recent research goes in the opposite direction – turning telescopes around and using them as powerful probes of the behaviour of novel materials at low temperatures.

Biography

  • Disglair Lecturer in Astronomy Instrumentation 2019 - present
  • Postdoctoral Research Associate (Condensed Matter and Photonics, Cardiff University) 2015 - 2019
  • Postdoctoral Research Associate (Astronomy Instrumentation, Cardiff University) 2013 - 2015
  • PhD (Condensed Matter Physics, University of Birmingham) 2008 - 2012

Publications

2021

2019

2018

2017

2016

2014

Teaching

  • Module Organiser for the Masters' level 'Instrumentation for Astronomy' course
  • Deputy Module Organiser for 'LabVIEW Programming for Physicists'
  • Assistant for the Gregynog residential course for final-year MPhys students

I am an experimental physicist and enjoy the challenge of building experiments to answer difficult questions. My primary research interest is the physics of novel disordered superconductors, such as granular diamond, and their application to astronomical detectors and quantum devices. Following on from fundamental studies, in my most recent work, I am studying the surprising observation of superconducting phase slip behaviour in three-dimensional superconducting diamond devices and the potential application towards a quantum current standard. I also work closely with industrial partners on the development of continuous cryogenic coolers for both far-infrared astronomical telescopes and as low-cost platforms for quantum computers.