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Dr Mathew Clement

Dr Mathew Clement

Research Associate

School of Medicine

Email
clementm@cardiff.ac.uk
Telephone
+44 (0)29 2068 7078
Campuses
Henry Wellcome Building for Biomedical Research, University Hospital of Wales, Heath Park, Cardiff, CF14 4XN

I am a Research Asscoiate working with Professor Ian Humphreys in the Humphreys Research laboratory within the Division of Infection & Immunity, School of Medicine under the theme of Persistent and Resistent Infections.

Education:

2013 - PhD in Immunology, Cardiff University, Cardiff

2001 - BSc in Biomedical Sciences, UWIC, Cardiff

Career overview:

Cardiff University:

2003 - present - Division of Infection & Immunity

2002 - 2003 - Dept of Psychological Medicine

Honours and awards

2019 - CURE Infection annual meeting oral presentation award

2018 - Hodge Centre for Neuropsychiatric Immunology project grant award

2017 - Hodge Centre for Neuropsychiatric Immunology seedcorn award

2016 - BSI Bright Spark in Immunology oral presentation award (post-doc session)

2016 - Cardiff University Animal Welfare Symposium NC3Rs award

2015 - BSI travel award

2014 - Cardiff University Infection & Immunity annual meeting oral presentation award

2013 - Cardiff University Independent Researcher Secondment Lecturer position

Professional memberships

British Society of Immunology 

Academic positions

Cardiff University:

2013 - present - Research Asscoiate - Division of Infection & Immunity, Cardiff University

2003 - 2013 - Research Assistant - Division of Infection & Immunity, Cardiff University

2002 - 2003 - Research Technician - Division of Psychological Medicine, Cardiff University

Speaking engagements

Oral presentation:

2019 - CMV 2019, Birmingham, Alabama, USA - invited speaker

2018 - Systems Immunity Research Institute Technologies event, Cardiff University - invited speaker

2018 - Hodge Centre for Neuropsychiatric Immunology, Cardiff University - invited speaker

2017 - Cardiff University Infection & Immunity annual meeting - invited speaker

2016 - UK CMV meeting, Cardiff - invited speaker

2016 - International Herpesvirus Workshop, Madison, Wisconsin, USA - invited speaker

2016 - British Society of Immunology annual meeting, Liverpool, UK - invited speaker

2015 - International Cytokine & Interferon Society annual meeting, Bamberg, Germany - invited speaker

2014 - UK CMV meeting, Birmingham, UK - invited speaker

2014 - Cardiff University Infection & Immunity annual meeting - invited speaker

2011 - Cardiff University Infection & Immunity annual meeting - invited speaker

Poster presentation:

2019 - CMV 2019, Birmingham, Alabama, USA

2016 - International Herpesvirus Workshop, Madison, Wisconsin, USA

2011 - AAI Immunology annual meeting, San Francisco, USA

2011 & 2013 - British Society of Immunology annual meeting, Liverpool, UK

2012, 2013, 2015, 2016 - Cardiff University Infection & Immunity annual meeting

Committees and reviewing

Journal reviewer - Immunology, Scientific Reports, guest reviewer for Journal of Virology and Journal of General Virology

2020

2019

2018

2017

2016

2015

2013

2012

2011

2010

2009

2008

2006

2005

2004

Virology Tutor, C21

Small Group (PCS) Tutor, Applied Immunology, C21

SSC Year 2 – Laboratory Placement Supervisor, C21

SSC Year 2 – Applied Immunology lectures, C21

To effectively study antiviral immunity, we employ the use of multiple in vivo models of viral infection. Currently my research focuses on the pathogen Cytomegalovirus (CMV).

CMV is a fairly ubiquitous β-Herpesvirus infecting approximately 50-80% of the world's population where the infection will remain asymptomatic in immuno-competent individuals. However in immune-compromised individuals such as HIV and AIDS patients, post-transplant recipient patients and during pregnancy, infection can cause morbidity and mortality. Further congential CMV infection can result in infants born with blindness, mental retardation and is the leading cause of congenital deafness. The significant area of my research is to study the immune responses to the virus within the mucosa of infected individuals in organs such as the Salivary Glands, a key area which we have identified that allows the virus to persist and replicate, and how the virus has developed immune escape mechanisms that promotes persistent infection. We have recently discovered using the MCMV model of infection that the immune regulatory cytokine IL-10 (which has been shown to suppress antiviral immunity (Humphreys et al, J Exp Med, 2007, Jones et al, J Immunol, 2010)) is produced by T-cells in both mouse and human mucosa which in turn is induced by IL-27. This then promotes viral persistence and viral shedding as a result of a suppressive response upon antiviral immunity (Clement et al PLoS Pathogens 2016).

Another area of my research is to identify the exact mechanisms that drive this cytokine induced antiviral immunity and how these cytokines can have both protective and pathological effects during infection (Clement & Humphreys, Front Immunol, 2019). We have identified an immune protein interferon-induced transmembrane protein 3 (ifitm3) that can restrict viral pathogenensis. The absence of such protein dramatically impacts on organ pathology as driven by the inflammatory cytokine IL-6 (Stacey, Clement et al, J Clin Invest, 2017). This has important implications in understanding how you can therapeutically target infected individuals with anti-inflammatory agents. This is especially important in ifitm3 as natural genetic polymorphisms which reduce the protective function of ifitm3 have been identified within specific human subsets.

2010 - Participation in the Wellcome Trust funded Researchers in Residence scheme, which included a featured article written about my teaching experience; http://wellcometrust.wordpress.com/2011/03/02/guest-post-researchers-in-residence/

(2006-Present) - Participated in coordination of the Immunology section of Cardiff University's Annual Science in Health Day, promoting biomedical research to students from South Wales and Southwest England.

2018 - Participated in St Brides Major primary school life sciences event, highlighting infectious diseases to Year 4 students, including practical use of Microscopes, buiding Lego antibodies and having fun making various types of 'snot & slime'.

External profiles

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