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 Amy Sparkes

Amy Sparkes

Research student, School of Earth and Ocean Sciences

Email
sparkesav@cardiff.ac.uk
Campuses
1.71, Main Building, Park Place, Cardiff, CF10 3AT

Mae'r cynnwys hwn ar gael yn Saesneg yn unig.

  • PhD Earth and Ocean Sciences (Oct 2014 – Present)
    Project title: 'Sea level changes during Earth's Greenhouse-Icehouse Transition: a combined data and modelling approach'
  • MRes Applied Marine Science, Plymouth University (2012 - 2013)
    Project title: 'Sea level during MIS 9: Evidence from the Nar Valley, north Norfolk, UK'
  • BSc Geography, Plymouth University (2009 – 20

Interests

  • Paleoceanography
  • Foraminifera
  • Eocene-Oligocene Transition
  • Geochemical Proxies

Thesis

Sea level changes during Earth’s Greenhouse-Icehouse transition: a combined data and modelling approach The overall aim of my PhD research is to increase understanding of the processes and feedbacks that led to the establishment of the Antarctic Ice Sheet (AIS) at the Eocene-Oligocene transition (EOT), around 34 million years ago. My project aims to generate benthic foraminiferal trace metal and stable isotope records from two deep water Atlantic sites; ODP Site 925 (Ceara Rise) and IODP Site 1406 (Newfoundland Sediment Drifts) to provide proxy records of temperature and seawater δ18O. Combining this proxy record with climate models to simulate changes across the EOT will give insight into the relationship between different forcing mechanisms and feedbacks within the climate system.

The overall aim of my PhD research is to increase understanding of the processes and feedbacks that led to the establishment of the Antarctic Ice Sheet (AIS) at the Eocene-Oligocene transition (EOT), around 34 million years ago. My project aims to generate benthic foraminiferal trace metal and stable isotope records from two deep water Atlantic sites; ODP Site 925 (Ceara Rise) and IODP Site 1406 (Newfoundland Sediment Drifts) to provide proxy records of temperature and seawater δ18O. Combining this proxy record with climate models to simulate changes across the EOT will give insight into the relationship between different forcing mechanisms and feedbacks within the climate system.

Carrie Lear

Professor Carrie Lear

Professor in Earth Science