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Yan Shan Tai

Research student, School of Psychology

Email
taiy3@cardiff.ac.uk
Campuses
Tower Building, 70 Park Place, Cardiff, CF10 3AT

Overview

We are better prepared for a situation if our expectation or understanding of the situation is accurate. Information from reliable external sources meant to improve the accuracy of these expectations or understanding might not be relied on in favour of existing expectations. As a result, the rules and strategies adopted might not be optimised for the situation at hand. My research interests lie in understanding whether and how people, such as first responders, use newly received information to guide their behaviour and performance when perceptual resolution is low, especially when they are under stress. To explore this topic, I use virtual reality technology along with eye tracking and other physiological measures.

Research

Research interests

We are better prepared for a situation if our expectation or understanding of the situation is accurate. Information from reliable external sources meant to improve the accuracy of these expectations or understanding might not be relied on in favour of existing expectations. As a result, the rules and strategies adopted might not be optimised for the situation at hand. My research interests lie in understanding whether and how people, such as first responders, use newly received information to guide their behaviour and performance when perceptual resolution is low, especially when they are under stress. To explore this topic, I use virtual reality technology along with eye tracking and other physiological measures.

Teaching

  • First Year Statistics Advisor
  • Final Year Statistics Advisor

Thesis

Rapid information integration in support of situational awareness and spatial behaviour

This project is concerned with how humans, especially those in the emergency services (e.g., firefighters) integrate new, incomplete, conflicting, and/or degraded multi-modal information in support of situational awareness, which in turn informs their spatial behaviour. In the context of firefighting, the requisite stages for situational awareness are often complicated by low salience of environmental or spatial cues (e.g., due to low visibility) and the dynamic nature of a fire incident. To operate under such conditions, firefighters form and rely on expectations about the current incident, which are informed by activated mental models built on prior knowledge, training, and experience. Additional, incident-specific information that is communicated to them could improve their situational awareness, but whether this new information is relied on is unknown. My research aims to address this question and explore ways to encourage more effective integration of newly received information and existing expectations when a person’s under extreme stress.

Funding source

EPSRC-DTP Studentship

Supervisors

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Dr Jacques Grange

Lecturer (Human Factors)

Dr Sabrina Cohen-Hatton

Dr Sabrina Cohen-Hatton

Honorary Research Fellow