Skip to main content
 Victoria Marcinkiewicz

Victoria Marcinkiewicz

Research student, School of Psychology

Email
marcinkiewiczv@cardiff.ac.uk
Campuses
Tower Building, 70 Park Place, Cardiff, CF10 3AT

Overview

Even as our ability to counter cyber-attack methods improves, it is inevitable that malevolent cyber-attacks will sometimes break through, either through exploited vulnerabilities of a system, or through user error. Aside from the material losses incurred, such attacks undermine trust that we place in these systems. Safety critical systems such as AVs are particularly vulnerable to loss of trust – as they are still a relatively new technology with relatively little wide-spread mass user experience. Here, the perceived increase to danger may be disproportionate to the reality but it will inevitably prevent the uptake of AVs. Issues of trust may particularly impact schemes by the UK government to roll out a ‘transport revolution’ worth £42 billion to the UK economy[1], and with such technologies being introduced as early as this year.

The project will examine how AV systems would be blamed and trusted (or not) in the event of a cybersecurity attack, and how the initial loss of trust in such systems could be countered by the human-machine interface (HMI) part-tailored towards human cyber security vulnerabilities – i.e., designed to support users to make better cyber security decisions. Little research has been conducted on blame assignment after an incident with an AV has occurred, with teams within Cardiff University (e.g., Morgan with Wallbridge and others) only just starting to examine these effects. Similarly use of humanoid robots in the cockpit of a car have been investigated during the course of driving, either by a person or an AV, but not after an incident has occurred.

Biography
  • Undergraduate Education – BA Criminology, University of Lincoln (2.i)
  • Postgraduate Education – MSc Criminology and Social Research – Cyber Crime and Cyber Security (Distinction)
  • Employment – Cyber Security and Information Assurance Consultant, Templar Executives

Research

Research interests

Even as our ability to counter cyber-attack methods improves, it is inevitable that malevolent cyber-attacks will sometimes break through, either through exploited vulnerabilities of a system, or through user error. Aside from the material losses incurred, such attacks undermine trust that we place in these systems. Safety critical systems such as AVs are particularly vulnerable to loss of trust – as they are still a relatively new technology with relatively little wide-spread mass user experience. Here, the perceived increase to danger may be disproportionate to the reality but it will inevitably prevent the uptake of AVs. Issues of trust may particularly impact schemes by the UK government to roll out a ‘transport revolution’ worth £42 billion to the UK economy[1], and with such technologies being introduced as early as this year.

https://www.cardiff.ac.uk/computer-science/research/research-areas/cybersecurity,-privacy-and-human-centered-computing

Research Supervisors

Professor Phil Morgan

Professor Omer Rana

Dr Tingting Li

Previous research: MSc dissertation on ‘The Road Ahead: Are autonomous vehicles a potential concern from a criminological perspective?’

After reviewing relevant literature, it was evident that limited discussions and papers have been written about Connected Autonomous Vehicles (CAV) from a criminological perspective. Using a participatory systems mapping methodology, the research explored concerns and challenges that could arise from the adoption of CAV. Whilst acknowledging the benefits of CAV, the research discussed potential concerns associated with CAV in relation to the changing dynamics of crime and crime control, hate crime, surveillance and cyber security including algorithmic alterations. The research was conducted through a shared iterative process. It did not intend to fuel criminal entrepreneurs neither support nor restrain the implementation of CAV. Furthermore, it did not wish to supress innovation.

Instead, the research aimed to contribute to current literature by providing a new insight about different concerns and considerations from a criminological perspective associated with CAV before they are adopted into everyday life. It also offered avenues for future research.

Thesis

Cyber Security Analytics: Anthropomorphic vs. Technomorphic Interfaces: Their Role in the Attribution of Blame and the Engendering of Trust after Cyber Attacks.

The main aim is to design interfaces that help to restore trust in the wake of such an attack, leading to increased adoption of AVs

Supervisors

Close up of Phil Morgan's face

Professor Phil Morgan

Professor, IROHMS Director of Research

alt

Dr Tingting Li

Lecturer

Omer Rana

Professor Omer Rana

College Dean of International
Professor of Performance Engineering