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Meredith Hood

Research student, School of History, Archaeology and Religion

cymraeg
Siarad Cymraeg

Overview

I am an environmental archaeologist, specialising in zooarchaeology, with a strong interest in public outreach and museum research.


My current research project is a collaborative doctoral partnership with Amgueddfa Cymru – National Museum Wales, funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council. It centres on the study of a large animal bone assemblage from the Early Medieval site of Llanbedrgoch, Anglesey. By comparing human/animal relationships in the Early Medieval kingdom of Gwynedd to other Welsh kingdoms, and to the rest of Britain, Ireland and continental Europe, it aims to explore the role and influence of animal husbandry practices, diet, trade and the economy during an important period in the creation of Welsh identity (AD 700-1100).


I will also work with Amgueddfa Cymru to use this research to engage young people and local communities with archaeology; in particular by thinking about how food in the past can inform us about issues such as identity, social structure, and the environment, and what this could mean for both the present and future.

Research

Research interests

Research interests:



  • Human-animal relationships

  • Animal husbandry practices

  • Exploring identity and status through zooarchaeological analyses

  • Museums and Heritage

  • Community outreach and public engagement


Education:



  • The University of Oxford, 2013-2016, BA (Hons) Archaeology and Anthropology

  • The University of Sheffield, 2019-2020, MSc Environmental Archaeology and Palaeoeconomy. Thesis: "A method for assessing wear rate in cattle molars, with an application to the Iron Age and Roman periods", supervised by Umberto Albarella.

  • Cardiff University, 2021-Present, PhD Archaeology. Thesis: "Food and Networks in Early Medieval Societies: Wales and the West", supervised by Professor Jacqui Mulville and Dr Mark Redknap.


Thesis

Food and Networks in Early Medieval Societies: Wales and the West

This collaborative doctoral project (CDP) with Amgueddfa Cymru - National Museum Wales will study early farming practices in the north Wales Irish Sea region, to explore the role and influence of animal husbandry practices, diet, trade and the economy during an important period in the creation of Welsh identity (AD 700-1100).


It centres on the analysis of the faunal remains from the enclosed settlement at Llanbedrgoch, Anglesey. This will then be compared to contemporary sites, to define the extent to which animal/human interactions in early medieval / Viking age Wales reflected practices in Ireland, Britain and continental Europe.


Research questions include:



  •  What were the mainstays of the 'historical' diet of the population in Wales and the West?

  • How did food consumption in the early medieval Welsh kingdom of Gwynedd differ in character from that of its neighbours? 

  • To what extent did husbandry support the wider economy?

  • How can animal-human interactions from ninth/tenth-century Wales and the evidence from contemporary Dublin, Man and northern England inform us of changing identities, class, and politics? 


I am being supervised by Professor Jacqui Mulville (Cardiff University) and Dr Mark Redknap (AC - NMW).

Funding source

Arts and Humanities Research Council Collaborative Doctoral Partnership

Supervisors

Jacqui Mullville

Professor Jacqui Mulville

Professor in Bioarchaeology, Director of Research and Impact

External profiles