Skip to content
 Neil Cook

Neil Cook

Research student, School of Biosciences

After completing my MSc in Tropical Coastal Management, I spent ten years in the NGO field working on coral reef assessment, management and capacity building programmes in small island states. This took me to marginalised fishing communities across the Pacific and ultimately Tobago in the Caribbean, where leading a collaboration with Global FinPrint to conduct baseline assessments of shark and ray populations was the catalyst for returning to academia to undertake my PhD.

Research interests

I am interested in how technology and machine learning can be used to answer questions regarding movement patterns, critical habitat availability and use by depleted marine megafauna, primarily sharks and turtles. I believe this is critical to better understand the ecology of species that are typically under-represented by more traditional methods of ecological assessment, and in turn inform evidence-based conservation initiatives including the implementation of fisheries management and protected areas.

I use an inter-disciplinary approach that engages local collaborators and community stakeholders in my research objectives. It is a important component of conservation management to effectively disseminate research findings and benefits in complex social environments, and therefore maximise the potential for success.

Thesis

New Technologies for Rapid Biodiversity Assessments of Individuals, Populations and Ecosystems

Funding source

Knowledge Economy Skills Scholarships 2 (KESS 2) is a pan-Wales higher level skills initiative led by Bangor University on behalf of the HE sector in Wales. It is part funded by the Welsh Government’s European Social Fund (ESF).

Photo of Sarah Perkins

Dr Sarah Perkins

Senior Lecturer

Professor Joanne Cable

Professor Jo Cable

Professor, Masters Lead

External profiles