Skip to main content
 Richard Jones

Richard Jones

Research student, School of Earth and Ocean Sciences

Email
jonesr126@cardiff.ac.uk
Campuses
Room 2.28, Main Building, Park Place, Cardiff, CF10 3AT

Academia

  • MPhil - School of Earth and Ocean Sciences, Cardiff University, UK (2017-Present)
  • BSc - School of Earth and Ocean Sciences, Cardiff University, UK  (2016)

Interests

  • Devonian Palaeobotany
  • Early land plants
  • Palaeozoic palaeoenvironments
  • Palaeosols
  • Palynology
  • Phytoterrestrialisation
  • Sedimentology of the Old Red Sandstones of the Anglo-Welsh Basin

Affiliations

  • Fellow of The Geological Society of London (FGS)
  • Member of The Palaeontological Association
  • Member of the Geologists’ Association
  • Member of the International Organisation of Palaeobotany
  • Member of the International Association of Sedimentologists

Teaching

  • EA1204 - Geographical Information Systems
  • EA1211 - History of Life
  • EA2130 - Applied GIS

Thesis

ENVIRONMENTAL CONTEXT AND AGE OF AN EARLY DEVONIAN FOSSIL PLANT ASSEMBLAGE FROM ABERGAVENNY

Sedimentary rocks of Early Devonian age (419 to 393 Million Years Ago) yield evidence for the history of the early development of life on land and the establishment of pioneering complex terrestrial ecosystems. In reality plant fossils of this age are rare. South Wales and the Welsh Borderlands are probably the most important area in the world for studying the nature and diversity of the most primitive forms of land plants, but even here, sites with abundant fossil plants that can be both dated and placed in their palaeo-environmental context are exceptionally rare.


A small quarry-style excavation that has been temporarily exposed by the preparation of ground for an agricultural building on a farm near Abergavenny allows an exceptional opportunity to study abundant plant fossils in their deposited setting and for attempts at dating to be made with high probability of success. This analysis will then be placed in the context of the regional and international understanding of land plant evolution.

Dr Chris Berry

Senior Lecturer

Professor Dianne Edwards

Research Professor