Ewch i’r prif gynnwys
Yr Athro Arwyn Tomos Jones

Yr Athro Arwyn Tomos Jones

Professor of Membrane Traffic and Drug Delivery

Ysgol Fferylliaeth a Gwyddorau Fferyllol

Siarad Cymraeg
Ar gael fel goruchwyliwr ôl-raddedig

I am a member of the School's research themes:

I have a major interest in endocytosis and cellular delivery of therapeutic macromolecules. My current projects fall under the overall themes of regulation of endocytosis and endocytic pathways

  • Targeting and endocytosis of plasma membrane receptors
  • Polymeric conjugates as drug delivery vectors
  • Cell penetrating peptides as drug delivery vectors

News Items

Public engagement with science

I am very active in public engagement of science, and have gained funding from both the Wellcome Trust and EPSRC to set up large public engagement activities. I regularly contribute to BBCS4C and Radio Cymru news programmes and am also engaged in discussing other aspects of science on TV and radio. I also visit local schools and colleges to showcase science.

In 2010 and 2011 I lead a Public Engagement project sponsored by the EPSRC to highlight the multidisciplinary science involved in, and potential of, tissue engineering. This £55K Partnership for Public engagement award "Tissue Engineering for Human Healing" was obtained with Dr Bob Steadman (Medic) and Dr Pete Griffiths (Chemy) and involved setting up tissue engineering exhibits and activities at various locations and activities in Wales and was launched at the 2010 National Eisteddfod of Wales in Ebbw Vale. Included there and twelve months later at the National Eisteddfod in Wrexham were a wide range of interactive and educational activities housed at the Eisteddfod Science Pavilion throughout the week. These included a life size operations game, maggot races and a Stem Cell puzzle. The Stem Cell Puzzle will now be a regular feature at the Techniquest science centre in Cardiff Bay.

My research Group are also very active in public engagement with science:

Career profile

I was appointed as Lecturer in Molecular Cell Biology at the School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Cardiff University in 2001, and was promoted to senior Lecturer in 2007 then to Reader in Membrane Traffic and Drug Delivery in 2011. Previously I gained my PhD in protein biochemistry and crystallography at Birkbeck College, University of London, and undertook postdoctoral positions investigating membrane traffic on the endocytic pathway at the Physiological Laboratory, University of Liverpool and Harvard School of Public Health, Harvard University, USA.

In 2000 I was awarded a European Molecular Biology Organization fellowship to work at the European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), Heidelberg Germany and continued at the EMBL and awarded an Alexander von Humboldt Foundation Scholarship.

I have a keen interest in the public understanding of science and in 2001 was awarded a Diploma in Journalism from the University of Wales Bangor.

Aelodaethau proffesiynol

2019

2018

2017

2016

2015

2014

2013

2012

2011

2010

2009

2008

2007

2006

2005

2004

2003

2001

1998

1997

  • PH1121  Molecule to patient
  • PH1122  The role of the pharmacist in professional practice
  • PH2110  Clinical & professional pharmacy
  • PH3110  Optimisation of pharmaceutical care
  • PH3202  Research methodology
  • PH4116  Pharmacy research or scholarship project
  • PH4118  Pharmaceutical sciences, pharmacy practice and the patient

External

Lectures on Module PHT202 on MSc/Diploma in Clinical Research course

Research interests

Research projects in my lab fall under themes of cell biology and endocytosis, concentrating on linking fundamental endocytosis research to the remit of cellular delivery of macromolecular therapeutics:

  • Characterisation of endocytic pathways utilised by therapeutic macromolecules to gain access into cells
  • Studying the mechanism of entry of cell penetrating peptides (CPP) and CPP-conjugates
  • Designing new polymer -conjugates for cellular delivery of therapeutic macromolecule
  • Utilising subcellular fractionation for analysis of endocytosis and intracellular traffic of therapeutic macromolecules.
  • Characterising roles for endocytic pathways in mediating multidrug resistance in cancer cells
  • Design and manufacture of microarray surfaces for multi-image analysis of biological specimens.

Current funding

Endocytic pathways and the cellular delivery of therapeutic macromolecules

Endocytosis encompasses highly complex and dynamic processes that cells use for example to allow entry of extracellular material and to downregulate cell surface receptors.  The utilisation of these pathways for uptake and intracellular delivery of therapeutic macromolecules offers much potential for intervention of diseases such as cancer. However, the effectiveness of this approach is constrained by the fact that the fate of the therapeutic within one of these pathways is predetermined by the dynamics of the pathway and biological barriers posed by endocytic membranes. A major objective of the laboratory is to better understand endocytic pathways of cells, to utilise specific pathways for cellular delivery of therapeutic macromolecules and to design novel drug delivery vectors for enhancing cytosolic delivery of therapeutics.

Ongoing projects include:
  • Pharmacological and molecular manipulation of endocytic pathways to characterise cellular uptake of therapeutic macromolecules
  • Characterising the transduction capacities of cell penetrating peptides across biological membranes and their potential as vectors for cellular delivery of therapeutic molecules
  • Polymer conjugates as vectors for cellular delivery of therapeutic macromolecules
  • Characterising the uptake of nanoparticles targeting tuberculosis in macrophages.

Collaboration

The group has strong local, national and international collaboration with academia and industry. Arwyn Jones is currently lead academic scientist covering cell binding an uptake on a €27M European consortium involving 16 academic partners and 6 major pharmaceutical companies.

Researchers in my group

  • Dr Jenny Wymant

Goruchwyliaeth gyfredol

Rohan Narayan

Research student