Ewch i’r prif gynnwys
Dr Beke Zwingmann

Dr Beke Zwingmann

Lecturer in Law

Ysgol y Gyfraith a Gwleidyddiaeth

Email:
zwingmannb@cardiff.ac.uk
Telephone:
+44(0)29 2087 4628
Location:
0.07, Adeilad y Gyfraith, Rhodfa'r Amgueddfa, Caerdydd, CF10 3AX

I am the Lecturer for Law & German and Programme Director for the LLB Law & German at Cardiff Law School. I obtained law degrees in Germany and France and recently completed my PhD examining German constitutional law and theory, supervised by Prof. Stijn Smismans. 

Over the past 12 years, I have led  and taught modules i.a. on English, German and comparative constitutional law, Legal skills and legal method (Common and Civil law tradition), European Union Law and Human rights law, in the UK, France and Germany. I have substantial experience in curriculum review and module design, in particular with regard to blending traditional and alternative teaching methods, i.a. blended learning, flipped classroom, portfolio assessment and experiential learning. In July 2015, I achieved the status of Fellow of the UK Higher Education Academy.

Education and qualifications

2016 PhD: Separation of Powers the ‘German’ way? The relationship of the German Federal Government and Parliament in the EU context
Supervisor: Prof. Stijn Smismans, Cardiff School of Law and Politics
Examiners: Prof. Anneli Albi (Kent); Prof. John Bell (Cambridge)
2002 Zweites Juristisches Staatsexamen (Bavaria, Germany: Second Legal State Examination, Qualification to practice as an attorney) 
2000 Erstes Juristisches Staatsexamen (Augsburg University, Germany: First Legal State Examination)
1998 Maîtrise en Droit International (University of Nice-Sophia Antipolis, France)

Career overview

2011 - present Lecturer in Law and German/ Programme Director of the LLB Law & German,
Cardiff School of Law and Politics (Teaching and Scholarship)
2013 - present Visiting Lecturer, Martin-Luther Universität Halle-Wittenberg (Germany)
2015 Visiting Lecturer, Universität Hamburg (Germany)
2006 - 2009 Visiting Lecturer, Institut de Recherche Europe-Asie,
Université Paul Cézanne (Aix-Marseille III), Aix-en-Provence (France)
2004 - 2009 DAAD-Fachlektorin/ Lecturer in law, Cardiff Law School  (Teaching and Scholarship)
2003 - 2004 Wissenschaftliche Mitarbeiterin (Teaching and Research Assistant),
Professor Dr. Johannes Masing, Chair for Public and Administrative Law, Augsburg University (Germany)

Aelodaethau proffesiynol

2015: Fellow of the UK Higher Education Academy

Ymrwymiadau siarad cyhoeddus

2016

An institutionally 'incapable' parliament and a functionally mute government – something wrong in the state of Germany? - May 
Cardiff School of Law and Politics Postgraduate Extravaganza 2016, Cardiff

2014

Separation of powers in the EU context – Does Germany have some housekeeping to do? - March
Law Schools of the Universities of Wales and Cardiff University Joint Staff and Student Conference 2014, Gregynog Hall, Newtown (Wales)

2013

Squaring the democratic circle? Comments on the BVerfG decision of 19 June 2012 (2 BvE 4/11 - ESM/ Informationsrechte des Bundestages) - June
Law after Lunch Public Lecture series, Martin-Luther Universität Halle-Wittenberg, Germany

2012

A Question of 'Justice'? How to deal with a tyrannical past - February
Law Schools of the Universities of Wales and Cardiff University Joint Staff and Student Conference 2012, Gregynog Hall, Newtown (Wales)

2011

Zotero – a reference manager and so much more! - May
Cardiff Law School Postgraduate Extravaganza 2011, Cardiff

2010

Representation of the interests of future generations in Parliament - September
Society of Legal Scholars Annual Conference 2010, Southampton

Financing German Federalism: comments on the 2006 and 2009 reforms of the Grundgesetz - May
Constitutional Decentralisation in Europe: Problem or Solution? (Workshop convened jointly by Cardiff Law School, the Jean Monet Centre of Excellence and the Law School of the Madrid Universidad Pontifica Comillas), Cardiff

Why Nature should not be a ‘mere’ resource – Rethinking environmental law - February
Law Schools of the Universities of Wales and Cardiff University Joint Staff and Student Conference 2010, Gregynog Hall, Newtown (Wales)

2009

The jurisprudence of the German Federal Constitutional Court since Brunner – Supremacy as a ‘matter of course’? - September
Society of Legal Scholars Annual Conference 2009, University of Keele

Holocaust denial as a crime – Time to reconsider the German position? - September
Society of Legal Scholars Annual Conference 2009, University of Keele

Hans Jonas’ Das Prinzip Verantwortung (The Imperative of Responsibility) and its influence on Environmental Ethics - May
Cardiff Law School Postgraduate Extravaganza 2009, Cardiff Law School

Supremacy of EC law and the German Federal Constitutional Court – all bark and no bite? - March
Law Schools of the Universities of Wales and Cardiff University Joint Staff and Student Conference 2009, Gregynog Hall, Newtown (Wales)

2008

Holocaust Denial as a Crime - March
Law Schools of the Universities of Wales and Cardiff University Joint Staff and Student Conference 2008, Gregynog Hall, Newtown (Wales)

Areas of teaching and supervision experience: 

  • English, German and comparative constitutional law 
  • Legal skills and legal method (Common and Civil law tradition) 
  • European Union Law 
  • Human rights law

I currently teach modules on German constitutional law and German legal skills and method on the LLB Law & German and supervise Undergraduate dissertations in the area of German, Austrian and comparative law. 

My research interests lie in the area of comparative constitutional law and constitutional theory, including the relationship of national constitutional systems to the European Union. I recently completed my PhD (titled: Separation of powers the ‘German way’? The relationship of the German Federal Government and Parliament in the EU context) examining German constitutional law and theory, supervised by Prof. Stijn Smismans. 

In my PhD, I analyse the jurisprudence of the German Federal Constitutional Court on Foreign Affairs and EU matters, with particular reference to the latest cases on the European Stability Mechanism (ESM), issued between 2010 and 2014. The objective was to assess the impact of the EU integration process on the relationship between the German Federal Government and Parliament. My conclusions are that despite appearances, the ESM cases do not constitute a re-definition of the relationship between the institutions. The court continues to conceptualise EU matters as ‘foreign affairs’ which undermines the democratic accountability of the German Federal Government as well as the concept of separation of powers as embodied in the German Constitution.