Ewch i’r prif gynnwys
Dr Ruselle Meade

Dr Ruselle Meade

Lecturer in Japanese Studies

Ysgol Ieithoedd Modern

Email:
meader@cardiff.ac.uk
Telephone:
+44 (0)29 2068 8488
Location:
1.10, 66a Plas y Parc, Cathays, Caerdydd, CF10 3AS
Ar gael fel goruchwyliwr ôl-raddedig

My primary area of research is modern Japanese history. I am particularly interested in the relationship between science and national identity in Japan since the mid-nineteenth century.

Before joining Cardiff University in September 2015, I was a lecturer in Japanese studies at the University of Manchester and then a JSPS postdoctoral fellow at the University of Tokyo. I was also awarded a D. Kim Foundation fellowship in the history of science in East Asia.

I obtained my PhD from the University of Manchester in 2013, and hold an MA from SOAS (London).

I originally trained as an engineer. After completing undergraduate studies, I moved to Tokyo where I worked for an intellectual property translation firm. This experience sparked my interest in history of technical translation – the focus of my doctoral research – and in the development of science and technology in Japan.

I teach on the following modules:

  • Japanese History
  • Intermediate Japanese (reading)
  • Advanced Readings in Japanese Business
  • Introduction to Translation Methods
  • Undergraduate dissertation in Japanese Studies

I also supervise dissertations on the MA in Translation Studies programme.

My research focuses on the cultural history of science in modern Japan. I am interested in how scientific knowledge circulates, particularly through the processes of translation and popularization.

In my current research I analyse how popularizations of science and technology helped mould Japanese ideas of nationhood and empire in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. This project draws on archives of books, nishiki-e (prints), newspapers and magazines from various collections in Japan to build a comprehensive picture of attempts to shape the public’s understanding of Japan as a ‘modern’ nation.

In March 2015, I co-organized the symposium Popularizing Science and Technology in the East and West , the papers from which will be collected in an edited volume.