Ewch i’r prif gynnwys

Projects

Mae'r cynnwys hwn ar gael yn Saesneg yn unig.

The Crime and Security Research Institute is involved in a number of ongoing research projects.

Crossing different academic disciplines and collaborating with the local community, our projects provide new information and perspectives on the crime and security sector.

Open Source Communications, Analytics and Research Development Centre

The Open Source Communications, Analytics and Research (OSCAR) Development Centre has been established to systematically investigate how the ‘information age’ is changing the operating environment for policing and community safety providers, and the implications that flow from this. Its particular focus is upon how an information abundance of ‘open source’ data is creating both new challenges and opportunities for police and their partners in terms of methodologies, problems and organisational structures.

Funded by the College of Policing, Home Office and Higher Education Funding Council for England, OSCAR has established a strategic partnership between the Institute and the UK Counter-Terrorism Functions Command, South Wales Police, West Midlands Police, Surrey Police, Sussex Police, Cardiff Council and the London Borough of Sutton. Seeded by previous projects, the OSCAR project exemplifies the Institute’s strategic intent to design new ideas and approaches by blending expertise in computer science and social research.

After Woolwich: social reactions on social media

The murder of Drummer Lee Rigby on the 22nd May 2013 in Woolwich rapidly acquired the properties of a signal crime (Innes, 2004). The changes to public and institutional perceptions of security were amplified by a series of secondary incidents of violence in the days and weeks following the original crime.

The study seeks to develop the Rigby homicide as a case study of social reactions to high profile major crimes to generate new knowledge about how publics interpret and make sense of such events. The proposed approach blends conceptual and methodological innovation by using social media data to study collective reaction patterns in ways not previously possible through more orthodox social science. Specifically, this involves examining how publics think, feel, or behave in relation to high profile crimes, and tracking these reactions as they ‘travel’ across public digital social networks. This will allow exploration into how perceptions, attitudes and polarised narratives emerge, are communicated, become modified, spread and ultimately decay.

Tackling radicalisation in dispersed societies

Working in partnership with the London Borough of Sutton and the Police Academy of the Netherlands, the Universities’ Police Science Institute has secured funding from the European Commission to explore how the risks of radicalisation can be reduced.

The particular focus of the project is upon communities where there are no defined population centres or clusters, reflecting how across Europe most activity aimed at preventing violent extremism has tended to be targeted towards particularly 'vulnerable' urban areas.

The research aims to develop new community intelligence methods that will enable European authorities to better detect a variety of risks and threats posed by different forms of extremism. In so doing, it builds upon and extends the Universities’ Police Science Institute’s established research programme on counter-terrorism policing.

The work of Welsh Government funded Community Support Officers

The Universities’ Police Science Institute is working to evaluate the impact of an additional 500 Community Support Officers funded by the Welsh Government.  These officers are currently being deployed across police forces in Wales with the objective of increasing community safety and reducing fear of crime.

Over the next 18 months, the Universities’ Police Science Institute team will assess how visible Community Support Officers are to the public, how they are being deployed in different communities and to what effect. A key aim will be to evaluate how far this additional investment in police resource is having positive impacts on public confidence and concerns about crime and antisocial behaviour, particularly in Community First areas identified as a priority by the Welsh Government.

Mapping services for victims of crime in South Wales

The purpose of the research is to provide a more evaluative component of the quality and delivery of victim services in South Wales consistent with the approach set out in the Code of Practice for Victims of Crime. It will determine the extent to which victim needs are being met under current arrangements, both in aggregate and by individual crime type by collating data on the following for each of the six areas identified in the specification:

  • Supply and demand: catchment areas of existing provision and victim demand for services based on referrals, self-referrals; waiting times, attrition rate.
  • Economic analysis: financial investment; cost/benefit; victim reach; victim satisfaction.
  • Quantity and quality of provision: assessment of victim outcome and performance data from individual providers where this data is both available and in a useable format; evidence of multi-agency working; nature of contact with South Wales Police.

Each of the six key crime areas will be the focus of a work package during this phase of the research: violent crime, acquisitive crime, hate incidents, anti-social behaviour, honour crimes / forced marriage / female genital mutilation and service provision for child victims of crime.

Rural Connect: how the police can connect with people living in rural communities

The Universities' Police Science Institute led a programme of high-level research for the Dyfed-Powys Police and Crime Commissioner which revealed that communities want stronger neighbourhood bonds with the police. Research included detailed discussions with members of the public, police officers and police staff.

The Universities’ Police Science Institute, the Commissioner’s Office and Dyfed-Powys Police ran the sessions where the key question was: “How can the police best connect with people living in rural communities?”

The Rural Connect report concluded that although police communities are doing excellent work across Carmarthenshire, Ceredigion, Pembrokeshire and Powys, much still needs to be done. It recommended that neighbourhood police officers and volunteers should be fully valued, that local knowledge should be developed and retained, that local decision-making should be encouraged and that the police should connect more with local people.

‘Soft facts’ and spontaneous community mobilisation: the role of rumour after major crime events

Innovation charity Nesta has funded a number of research projects that explore two dimensions of how big and open data can be used for the common good. Firstly, how it can be used by charities to develop better products and services and secondly, how it can help those interested in civil society better understand social action and civil society activity.

The Universities’ Police Science Institute is one of five organisations to receive funding under the scheme to explore how data–driven methods, such as open data analysis and social media analysis, can help us understand informal social action, often referred to as ‘below the radar activity’ in new ways.

The project brings together researchers from both the Universities’ Police Science Institute and Cardiff University’s School of Computer Sciences to examine how social media increasingly shapes and frames processes of community mobilisation following major crime events. In so doing, it illuminates social reactions that are frequently ‘seen but unnoticed’ in the aftermath of high profile crimes. Pivoting around several case studies of community mobilization in difficult and emotionally tense situations, the analysis distils some generalisable lessons about how social media are transforming the ways contemporary social life is organised.

The early results of the study have been published as a working paper - ‘Soft Facts’ and Spontaneous Community Mobilisation: The Role of Rumour After Major Crime Events written by Colin Roberts, Martin Innes, Alun Preece and Irena Spasic.

Policing Futures

Policing Futures: a masterclass programme for South Wales Police officers and staff

The Policing Futures Masterclass Series is designed to provide the knowledge, skills and experience required to develop critical thinking and evidence-based practice among those considered future leaders within the force.

Tri Service

The South Wales Tri-Service Public Service and Joint Emergency Control Centre: an evaluation

This study involves a multi-method evaluation of the development of a Tri-Service Public Service and Joint Emergency Control Centre in South Wales.

IT DAIS

International alliance on distributed analytics via artificial intelligence and machine learning

The Crime and Security Research Institute have formed a partnership with the US Army Research Laboratory (ARL) and the UK Defence Science and Technology Laboratory (Dstl) to create the Distributed Analytics and Information Science International Technology Alliance. (DAIS ITA).

EDARA

Evaluating the diversion of alcohol-related attendances (EDARA)

This project will evaluate the effectiveness, cost-effectiveness, efficiency and acceptability of Alcohol Intoxication Management Services (AIMS) in managing alcohol-related Emergency Department attendances.

ELASTIC

Alcohol misuse: electronic longitudinal alcohol study in communities (ELAStiC)

The ELAStiC project looks at the impact of alcohol misuse on health and well-being with outputs which are relevant to academics, policy makers and practitioners and challenge harmful alcohol use in the UK and the world.

OSCAR

Open Source Communications, Analytics and Research Development Centre

The Open Source Communications, Analytics and Research Development Centre systematically investigates how the ‘information age’ is changing the operating environment for policing and community safety providers, and the implications that flow from this.

After Woolwich

After Woolwich: social reactions on social media

The study seeks to develop the Lee Rigby homicide as a case study of social reactions to high profile major crimes to generate new knowledge about how publics interpret and make sense of such events.

TARDIS

Tackling radicalisation in dispersed societies

The Universities’ Police Science Institute explores how the risks of radicalisation can be reduced.

Community Support Officers

The work of Welsh Government funded community support officers

The Universities’ Police Science Institute is working to evaluate the impact of an additional 500 Community Support Officers funded by the Welsh Government. 

Victim Services

Mapping services for victims of crime in South Wales

This research addresses how the delivery of victim services in South Wales is evaluated.

Rural Connect

Rural Connect: how the police can connect with people living in rural communities

The Universities' Police Science Institute led a programme of high-level research for the Dyfed-Powys Police and Crime Commissioner which revealed that communities want stronger neighbourhood bonds with the police.

Soft Facts

'Soft Facts' and spontaneous community mobilisation: the role of rumour after major crime events

Innovation charity Nesta has funded a number of research projects that explore two dimensions of how big and open data can be used for the common good.