Welsh and Religious Studies (BA)

Please note that this course is currently under review. Therefore the information shown is subject to change and indicative only. The review is expected to be completed by February 2017. This page will be updated after that date and will then represent the basis on which the University intends to deliver the course

Religious Studies and Welsh BA (Joint Honours) enables students to combine the study of religion, which has formed part of human life since the beginning of human existence, with the study of the Welsh language, its literature and culture.

By combining Welsh and Religious Studies, you will gain a wealth of transferable skills and knowledge, opening the doors to a variety of career paths. You may find studying a joint honours degree both stimulating and rewarding as you observe similarities and differences between the two subjects. Often, there are complementary issues and perspectives that link the areas of study, be they critical analysis, historical context or recent research.

The Welsh course is relevant to contemporary Wales and delivered by a school noted for its research quality and impact. The course aims to produce graduates with a thorough academic and practical understanding of the Welsh language, its literature and culture, a high level of skill in written and spoken Welsh and well-developed employability and creative skills relevant to modern Wales.

Religion has been part of human experience from the earliest traces of human existence up to the present day. It has been the way most cultures have sought to express their understanding of the purpose of life and the foundation of personal and social behaviour. As a student of Religious Studies, you will have the opportunity to explore your own and other peoples' religious history and culture, and some of the fundamental questions of existence.

Distinctive features

The distinctive features of the course include:

  • the opportunity to follow a degree course that develops skills relevant to both the academic world and the workplace
  • a core module which focuses on employability skills and which offers a period of work experience
  • a range of core and optional modules in Welsh language, literature and culture as well as the opportunity to specialise in areas of personal and career interest
  • the emphasis on practical research skills, that will benefit you throughout your career
  • the emphasis on independent learning in a supportive environment
  • the involvement of research-active staff in teaching
  • the experience of being taught by staff who will recognise you as an individual
  • the opportunity to explore religions in relation to a wide range of historical, theoretical, and social issues, and
  • the exploration of a range of methodological approaches to religious studies, including textual hermeneutics, language study, gender theories, conflict studies, cultural and theoretical anthropology
  • the opportunity to learn languages that allow you to study some religious texts in their original form, for example New Testament Greek and Sanskrit.

Key facts

UCAS CodeQV56
Next intakeSeptember 2017
Duration3 years
ModeFull time
Studying in WelshUp to 56% of this course is available through the medium of Welsh. Please contact the Admissions tutor for more information
Typical places availableThe School of Welsh typically has 30 places available. The School of History, Archaeology and Religion typically has 320 places available.
Typical applications receivedThe School of Welsh typically receives 100 applications. The School of History, Archaeology and Religion typically receives 1800 applications.
Admissions tutor(s)

Entry requirements

For detailed entry requirements see the School of History, Archaeology & Religion and School of Welsh admissions criteria pages.

Typical A level offerBBB.Three A-level subjects including Welsh and other than General Studies. Two AS subjects other than General Studies may be considered in lieu of a third A-level.
Typical Welsh Baccalaureate offerGrade A in the Core and grades AB at A-level, including Welsh.
Typical International Baccalaureate offer26 points.
Other qualificationsApplications from those offering alternative qualifications are welcome.

This is a three-year full-time degree, consisting of 120 credits a year. You’ll study six 20-credit modules a year, split equally between Welsh and Religious Studies.

The modules shown are an example of the typical curriculum and will be reviewed prior to the 2017/18 academic year. The final modules will be published by July 2017.

Year one

You will take 120 credits in all. There are two routes in the first year, one for students who have studied Welsh as a first language and the other for students who have studied Welsh as a second language. First-language Welsh students will take 60 credits in Welsh and 60 in Religious Studies, while second-language students will take 80 credits in Welsh and 40 in Religious Studies.

The emphasis in year one Welsh is on developing key skills (linguistic, analytical, creative and employability) in the fields of language and literature, and all students follow a set number of modules with an appropriate number of contact hours. The School will also provide additional arrangements for second language students to develop and practise their language skills.

Normally, students who have studied A-level Welsh as a second language follow the second-language route, but we will consider your linguistic skills, both oral and written, before deciding which route you will follow.

For the first-language route the core modules are:

  • Iaith ac Ystyr [Language and Meaning]
  • Awdur, Testun a Darllenydd [Author, Text and Reader]
  • Y Gymraeg yn y Gymru Gyfoes [The Welsh Language in Contemporary Wales]

For the second-language route the core modules are:

  • Sgiliau Llafar [Oral Skills]
  • Defnyddio’r Gymraeg [Using Welsh]
  • Astudio Llenyddiaeth [Studying Literature]
  • Y Gymraeg Heddiw [The Welsh Language Today]

In your first year of Religious Studies, you are encouraged to acquire a broad knowledge of the history of the Christian Church and Christian theological thought, as well as a number of world religions such as Hinduism, Buddhism, Judaism and Islam

You will develop the basic skills required for the academic study of religions and theology, including an introduction to languages such as Sanskrit, Arabic, Hebrew or New Testament Greek to be able to study religious texts in their original languages. Your year one modules will allow you to study religion through texts, poetry, art, film, biographies, fieldwork and drama.

Module titleModule codeCredits
Module titleModule codeCredits
Sgiliau llafarCY150020 credits
Defnyddio'r GymraegCY150120 credits
Astudio LlenyddiaethCY150620 credits
Y Gymraeg HeddiwCY150820 credits
Iaith ac YstyrCY160020 credits
Awdur, Testun a DarllenyddCY160120 credits
Y Gymraeg yn y Gymru GyfoesCY160220 credits
Introduction To SanskritRT110620 credits
Further Elementary SanskritRT110720 credits
Introduction To ArabicRT110920 credits
Further Elementary ArabicRT111020 credits
Introduction To The Study of Religion 1RT111120 credits
Introduction To The Study of Religion 2RT111220 credits
Introduction To The BibleRT210320 credits
The Story of ChristianityRT410320 credits

Year two

You will take 60 credits in Welsh and 60 credits in Religious Studies.

In year two Welsh, you will build on the skills and knowledge acquired in year one. The core linguistic elements of the course focus on language skills within both an academic and a vocational context, and include a period of work experience in a workplace in which Welsh is used on a daily basis.

Alongside these core elements, the Welsh course offers optional modules in years two and three in Welsh language, literature and culture, including several with direct relevance to specific fields of employment, such as language planning, scriptwriting and translation.

Year two in Religious Studies will give you the opportunity to develop a more advanced knowledge of Christian theology and history and related subjects, building on introductory modules undertaken in year one. You will take modules designed to develop your awareness of the role of religion in shaping the cultural, intellectual, and ethical concerns of contemporary societies, and develop a more advanced knowledge of a range of religious traditions, such as Islam in the contemporary world, ancient and modern Judaism or the life of the Buddha.

Module titleModule codeCredits
Ysgrifennu CreadigolCY212420 credits
Cymraeg y Gweithle a'r GymunedCY220020 credits
Sgiliau IaithCY250120 credits
Ysgrifennu AcademaiddCY250220 credits
Ailddehongli Llenyddiaeth yr Oesoedd CanolCY310020 credits
Llenyddiaeth er 1900CY320020 credits
Llenyddiaeth PlantCY331020 credits
Theori a Beirniadaeth LenyddolCY333020 credits
TafodieithegCY345020 credits
SosioieithyddiaethCY353020 credits
Elementary Sanskrit IRT120120 credits
Elementary Sanskrit IIRT120220 credits
Elementary Arabic IRT120320 credits
Elementary Arabic IIRT120420 credits
Intermediate Sanskrit TextsRT122420 credits
Religion and the News: Conflict and ContextRT130020 credits
Arabic Texts IRT131020 credits
Islam in the Contemporary WorldRT132720 credits
Socially Engaged Buddhism: Politics, Justice and EthicsRT133520 credits
The Making of 'World Religions' in South Asia: Hindus, Sikhs and MuslimsRT133620 credits
Myth and The Movies: Anthropology and Psychology in Contemporary CinemaRT135020 credits
The Life of the BuddhaRT135220 credits
Religion in the WorkplaceRT135420 credits
The Most Famous Hindu Text: Bhagavadgita, Text & ContextRT135520 credits
God, Good and the Ugly: Topics in Applied Islamic EthicsRT135720 credits
Exploring GnosticismRT135920 credits
Islamic Law and SocietyRT136120 credits
History & Religion of Ancient IsraelRT230120 credits
New Testament EpistlesRT320520 credits
New Testament Greek Texts IRT320920 credits
Reformation HistoryRT420520 credits
The Early Church: History and MemoryRT420820 credits
Christian Spirituality, 150-1550 CERT430720 credits
Understanding Christian WorshipRT432020 credits
Pastor, Martyr, Prophet, Spy: Bonhoeffer's Life and LegacyRT432620 credits
Beliefs in the CrucibleRT520420 credits
Christian 'Church' Today: Its Meaning, Life and MissionRT520520 credits
Christian Social Ethics TodayRT731720 credits
Majority World Voices: Global South TheologiesRT734220 credits

Year three

You will take 60 credits in Welsh and 60 credits in Religious Studies.

In Welsh, it is compulsory to choose one of the following modules:

  • Blas ar Ymchwil [Research Taster]
  • Ymchwilio Estynedig [Extended Research]

You have a choice of an essay or project of 4,000 words (20 credits) or 8,000 words (40 credits), to be completed under the direction of a member of staff who is an expert in the relevant field. This may lead to further research or provide an effective showcase for potential employers. You will also choose more optional modules.

Year three in Religious Studies will allow you to further deepen your understanding of religious themes and topics such as gender and sexuality or Islamic perspectives with a range of specialised modules. You will acquire skills in qualitative and quantitative research into religion(s) in modern societies, and have the opportunity to write a research dissertation.

You will also build upon your religious language knowledge acquired in years one and two and develop high-level translation and text-critical skills across a range of language modules.

Module titleModule codeCredits
Ysgrifennu CreadigolCY212420 credits
Ailddehongli Llenyddiaeth yr Oesoedd CanolCY310020 credits
Llenyddiaeth er 1900CY320020 credits
Llenyddiaeth PlantCY331020 credits
Theori a Beirniadaeth LenyddolCY333020 credits
TafodieithegCY345020 credits
SosioieithyddiaethCY353020 credits
Cyfieithu ProffesiynolCY370520 credits
Blas ar YmchwilCY390020 credits
Ymchwilio EstynedigCY390540 credits
Elementary Sanskrit IRT120120 credits
Elementary Sanskrit IIRT120220 credits
Elementary Arabic IRT120320 credits
Elementary Arabic IIRT120420 credits
Intermediate Sanskrit TextsRT122420 credits
Religion and the News: Conflict and ContextRT130020 credits
Arabic Texts IRT131020 credits
Islam in the Contemporary WorldRT132720 credits
Socially Engaged Buddhism: Politics, Justice and EthicsRT133520 credits
The Making of 'World Religions' in South Asia: Hindus, Sikhs and MuslimsRT133620 credits
Open Choice TranslationRT134920 credits
Myth and The Movies: Anthropology and Psychology in Contemporary CinemaRT135020 credits
The Life of the BuddhaRT135220 credits
Religion in the WorkplaceRT135420 credits
The Most Famous Hindu Text: Bhagavadgita, Text & ContextRT135520 credits
God, Good and the Ugly: Topics in Applied Islamic EthicsRT135720 credits
Exploring GnosticismRT135920 credits
Islamic Law and SocietyRT136120 credits
History & Religion of Ancient IsraelRT230120 credits
New Testament EpistlesRT320520 credits
New Testament Greek Texts IRT320920 credits
Reformation HistoryRT420520 credits
The Early Church: History and MemoryRT420820 credits
Christian Spirituality, 150-1550 CERT430720 credits
Understanding Christian WorshipRT432020 credits
Pastor, Martyr, Prophet, Spy: Bonhoeffer's Life and LegacyRT432620 credits
Beliefs in the CrucibleRT520420 credits
Christian 'Church' Today: Its Meaning, Life and MissionRT520520 credits
Open Choice DissertationRT731620 credits
Christian Social Ethics TodayRT731720 credits
Majority World Voices: Global South TheologiesRT734220 credits
The University is committed to providing a wide range of module options where possible, but please be aware that whilst every effort is made to offer choice this may be limited in certain circumstances. This is due to the fact that some modules have limited numbers of places available, which are allocated on a first-come, first-served basis, while others have minimum student numbers required before they will run, to ensure that an appropriate quality of education can be delivered; some modules require students to have already taken particular subjects, and others are core or required on the programme you are taking. Modules may also be limited due to timetable clashes, and although the University works to minimise disruption to choice, we advise you to seek advice from the relevant School on the module choices available.

How will I be taught?

We offer a supportive learning environment, where you are enabled to acquire a range of skills and a wealth of specialist knowledge. Our courses foster intellectual skills, such as critical thinking, close analysis, evaluating evidence, constructing arguments, using theory and the effective deployment of language in writing and in debate. We also help you gain experience in team working, independent research and time management.

You will be taught both by lecture and seminar. Lectures provide an overview of the key concepts and frameworks for a topic, equipping you to carry out independent research for the seminars and to develop your own ideas. Seminars provide an opportunity for you to explore the ideas outlined in the lectures.

Seminars usually consist of about 15 students and the seminar leader (a member of the teaching team). Seminars may take various formats, including plenary group discussion, small-group work and student-led presentations. For Welsh, there is also an important role to be played by tutorials, workshops and language classes (especially for students following the second language route).

How will I be supported?

As well as having regular feedback from your personal tutor in each course, you will have a reading week each semester for guided study and a chance to catch up on assessed work, reading and revision. These weeks are also used by staff to visit students on their year abroad.

You will have access through the Learning Central website to relevant multimedia material, presentations, lecture handouts, bibliographies, further links, electronic exercises and discussion circles.

The University offers a range of services including the Careers Service, the Counselling Service, the Disability and Dyslexia Service, the Student Support Service, and excellent libraries and resource centres.

Feedback

We’ll provide you with frequent feedback on your work. This comes in a variety of formats including oral feedback during tutorials, personalised feedback on written work, feedback in lectures and seminars, generic written feedback and feedback on tutorial performance.

Coursework will be marked by your module tutor and your tutor will give you written feedback on your work. You will also have a feedback class after each assessment. Students will be given general feedback in relation to examinations following the May/June examination period and you will be able to discuss your overall performance with your personal tutor as part of the monitored student self-assessment scheme.

How will I be assessed?

A range of assessment methods are used, including essays, examinations, presentations, portfolios and creative assignments.

Essays and examinations are used not only for assessment purposes but also as a means of developing your capacities to gather, organise, evaluate and deploy relevant information and ideas from a variety of sources in reasoned arguments. Dedicated essay workshops and individual advice enable you to produce your best work, and written feedback on essays feeds forward into future work, enabling you to develop your strengths and address any weaker areas.

The optional final-year dissertation provides you with the opportunity to investigate a specific topic of interest to you in depth and to acquire detailed knowledge about a particular field of study, to use your initiative in the collection and presentation of material and present a clear, cogent argument and draw appropriate conclusions.

What skills will I practise and develop?

As a result of engaging fully with this course, you will acquire and develop a range of valuable skills, both those which are discipline specific and more generic ‘employability skills’. These will allow you to:

  • grasp complex issues with confidence
  • ask the right questions of complex texts
  • have an imaginative appreciation of different views and options and analyse these critically
  • identify and apply relevant data
  • develop practical research skills
  • propose imaginative solutions of your own that are rooted in evidence
  • communicate clearly, concisely and persuasively in writing and speech
  • work to deadlines and priorities, managing a range of tasks at the same time
  • learn from constructive criticism and incorporate its insights
  • work as part of a team, developing a collaborative approach to problem-solving
  • use IT programmes and digital media, where appropriate
  • take responsibility for your own learning programme and professional development

School of Welsh

In 2013/14, 100% of the School of Welsh’s graduates who were available for work reported they were in employment and/or further study within six months of graduating.

The demand for Welsh speakers means that a degree in Welsh can be highly valuable for jobs and roles that require bilingual speakers. Many of our graduates are now following careers in areas such as law, politics, media, performing arts, administration and education, or engaged in postgraduate study.

School of History, Archaeology and Religion

In 2013/14, 92% of the School’s graduates who were available for work reported they were in employment and/or further study within six months of graduation.

At the School of History, Archaeology and Religion we organise interactive workshops with the Careers Service to help students identify their skills and attributes and have our own, in-School Workplace Placements and employability officer. Some of our graduates enter professions which make direct use of their academic expertise while others compete very successfully in a wide range of other fields.

Tuition fees

UK and EU students (2017/18)

Please see our fee amounts page for the latest information.

Students from outside the EU (2017/18)

Please see our fee amounts page for the latest information.

Will I need any specific equipment to study this course/programme?

You will not need any specific equipment.

Year two includes a period of work experience in a workplace in which Welsh is used on a daily basis. This period of work experience is part of a programme of events designed to focus on developing employability and career skills.

The School of History, Archaeology and Religion also has a dedicated Work Placements Officer who supports students with work experience opportunities both in and out of term time


Key Information Sets (KIS) make it easy for prospective students to compare information about full or part time undergraduate courses, and are available on the Unistats website.