Media, Journalism and Culture (BA)

The degree is concerned with the study and examination of an essential part of modern life – the media.

The overall aim of our Media, Journalism and Culture course is to equip you to become a well-informed citizen in a media-saturated society.

Our courses study the many facets of journalism, media, culture and communications, and consider in an era of globalisation and dynamic social change their impact on society, politics and popular culture. They provide you with job-specific skills such as research methods and optionally, journalistic practice as well as much broader transferable skills valuable to a range of sectors.

This degree begins from the assumption that in order to understand modern society, we need to understand the central role that media and the cultural industries play in that society.

While you will be able to take a limited number of more practical modules, the emphasis of the degree is academic and analytical.

You will join a stimulating intellectual environment committed to maximising your potential through personal development and careers events. Many of our experienced lecturers are internationally recognised in their subject areas.

While this course is both challenging and academic in nature, it does NOT provide vocational journalism training.

Distinctive features

The distinctive features of the course include:

  • media modules are as diverse as Managing Media Communications, War Politics and Propaganda and Communicating Causes
  • you will have access to Erasmus and Study Abroad schemes
  • careers weeks and workshops organised regularly to ensure your readiness for the ‘world of work’

Key facts

UCAS CodeR5V2
Next intakeSeptember 2016
Duration3 years
ModeFull time
Studying in WelshUp to 33% of this course is available through the medium of Welsh. Please contact the Admissions tutor for more information
Typical places availableThe School typically has 125 places available.
Typical applications receivedThe School typically receives 600 applications.
Typical A level offerABB, excluding General Studies and Critical Thinking.
Typical Welsh Baccalaureate offerGrade A in the Core, plus AB at A-Level.
Typical International Baccalaureate offer33 points.
Other qualificationsApplications from those offering alternative qualifications are welcome. Detailed alternative entry requirements are available for this course
Admissions tutor(s)

The BA in Media, Journalism and Culture is a three-year, full time, modular course. Most modules include 12 weeks of teaching and the rest of the semester is devoted to exams and other kinds of assessment, along with the processes of marking and exam boards. 

Year one

Six core 20-credit modules are taught mainly using a lecture/seminar format. You will be introduced to ideas and approaches in lectures and carry out more applied and team-based work in seminars.

Module titleModule codeCredits
RepresentationsMC111420 credits
History of Mass Communication & CultureMC111020 credits
Media ScholarshipMC111520 credits
Advertising and the Consumer SocietyMC111920 credits
Understanding Journalism StudiesMC157820 credits
An Introduction to Media AudiencesMC111820 credits

Year two

One core and five optional modules are taught mainly using a lecture/seminar format, although the tasks developed in seminars will be more ambitious.

You will be expected to develop research protocols, both on your own and in groups, and will begin to experiment with and design methodological procedures (such as survey methods, ethnography, and content and discourse analysis).

By the end of year two, you will have the skills necessary to write a dissertation in year three.

Year three

Year three consists of an optional dissertation, one core module and a choice of elective modules allowing you to specialise in your areas of interest. While a number of these will be based on a lecture/workshop format, the range of teaching methods will be more diverse and involve assignments of greater complexity and challenge.

You will conduct independent research and apply theoretical ideas and approaches to practical and/or analytical work.

The University is committed to providing a wide range of module options where possible, but please be aware that whilst every effort is made to offer choice this may be limited in certain circumstances. This is due to the fact that some modules have limited numbers of places available, which are allocated on a first-come, first-served basis, while others have minimum student numbers required before they will run, to ensure that an appropriate quality of education can be delivered; some modules require students to have already taken particular subjects, and others are core or required on the programme you are taking. Modules may also be limited due to timetable clashes, and although the University works to minimise disruption to choice, we advise you to seek advice from the relevant School on the module choices available.

How will I be taught?

Our teaching is often led and informed by our research. You will be taught in a supportive environment and assigned a personal tutor who is a member of academic staff and able to advise on a wide range of issues.

There will be multi-media and new media learning and production practices  should you opt for some of the more practical journalism and media modules.

How will I be supported?

You will have regular meetings with your personal tutor.

You will have access through the Learning Central website to relevant multimedia material, presentations, lecture handouts, bibliographies, links, electronic exercises and discussion circles.

The University offers a range of services including the Careers Service, the Counselling Service, the Disability and Dyslexia Service, the Student Support Service, and excellent libraries and resource centres.

How will I be assessed?

A number of modules involve formative methods of assessment. These usually involve the production of proposals for research based essays (including the dissertation), allowing module tutors the opportunity to provide feedback before you embark on more substantial pieces of written work or other projects. In some cases, formative assignments will have a summative element, and form part of the overall assessment.

The School of Journalism, Media and Cultural Studies guarantees that for assessed work:

  • the marking criteria will be clearly displayed
  • you will receive detailed typed written comments on your text
  • you will receive prompt feedback and all assessed work will be returned to you within four weeks
  • the feedback will be explanatory and worded to help you improve
  • where necessary we will meet you individually to ensure you understand the feedback

NOTE: The University welcomes applications from disabled students and we may be able to offer alternative assessment methods. However, this may not always be possible, for example where performance is a mode of assessment in a performance module. Such competence standards may limit the availability of adjustments or alternative assessments, but you should refer to the module descriptions for details.

What skills will I practise and develop?

You will acquire and develop a range of valuable skills, both discipline specific and more generic ‘employability skills’, which will allow you to:

  • read, analyse and synthesise complex academic texts
  • analyse different media texts, including word, image and sound
  • communicate clearly, concisely and persuasively in writing and speech
  • learn from constructive criticism and incorporate its insights
  • work both independently and as part of a team, developing a collaborative approach to problem-solving
  • carry out various forms of independent research for essays, projects, creative productions or dissertations
  • work to deadlines and priorities, managing a range of tasks at the same time
  • use IT programmes and digital media, where appropriate
  • take responsibility for your own learning programme and professional development

In 2013/14, 96% of our graduates who were available for work reported they were in employment and/or further study within six months of graduation.

Many graduates progress onto our postgraduate journalism, public relations and communications master's degrees and from there to various jobs in the media.

Recent examples of entry level jobs include: content author, digital media executive, social media policy adviser, research intern, editorial intern, reporter, PR executive/assistant, policy intern, campaign executive, teaching assistant and also project manager.

Having progressed from entry level jobs our alumni now hold numerous media and administration roles such as: production journalist (Telegraph Media Group), magazine editor (The Independent), senior press officer (Guardian News & Media), film producer (See Saw Films) and digital campaigns & community manager (Ruder Finn).

Jobs

  • Journalist
  • Digital Media Executive
  • Social Media Policy Advisor
  • Editor
  • Public Relations

UK and EU students 2016/17

EU students entering in 2016/17 will pay the same tuition fee as UK students for the duration of their course. Please be aware that fees may increase annually in line with inflation. No decisions regarding fees and loans for EU students starting in 2017/18 have been made yet. These will be determined as part of the UK's discussions on its membership of the EU and we will provide further details as soon as we can.

Tuition feeDepositNotes
£9,000None

Financial support may be available to individuals who meet certain criteria. For more information visit our Funding and fees section. Please note that these sources of financial support are limited and therefore not everyone who meets the criteria are guaranteed to receive the support.

Students from outside the EU 2016/17

Tuition fees for international students are fixed for the majority of three year undergraduate courses. This means the price you pay in year one will be the same in years two and three. Some courses are exempt, including four and five year programmes. Please check with us for full clarification.

Tuition feeDepositNotes
£14,500None

Will I need any specific equipment to study this course/programme?

You will not need any specific equipment.

No interview process, offer holders will be invited to Applicant Visit days in Feb/March each year.


Key Information Sets (KIS) make it easy for prospective students to compare information about full or part time undergraduate courses, and are available on the Unistats website.