English Literature and Religious Studies (BA)

Many students find joint honours both stimulating and rewarding as they observe both similarities and differences in the two subjects.

The Joint Honours degree in English Literature and Religious Studies provides you with the opportunity of specialising in two university honours subjects.
 
As a joint honours student, you will find that often there are complementary issues and perspectives as well as skills and that link subjects, be they critical analysis, historical contexts or recent research.

English Literature at Cardiff offers access to the whole span of English literature, from the Anglo-Saxon period to the twenty-first century. Nor is the curriculum restricted to the printed word: we are intrigued by the connections between literature and film, art, music, history, language, and popular culture, and our teaching reflects these interests.

Religion has been part of human experience from the earliest traces of human existence up to the present day. It has been the way most cultures have sought to express their understanding of the purpose of life and the foundation of personal and social behaviour. The study of religion is therefore rich and exciting, and you will have the opportunity to explore your own and other peoples' religious history and culture, and some of the fundamental questions of existence in a flourishing centre of research.

Each school involved in delivering the degree offers a challenging programme of modules, supported by a friendly atmosphere and excellent staff-student relationships.

Key facts

UCAS CodeVQ63
Entry pointSeptember 2016
Duration3 years
Typical places availableThe School typically has 350 places available
Typical applications receivedThe School typically receives 1450 applications
Typical A level offerAAB including an A in English Literature or English Literature and Language or Creative Writing. General Studies is not accepted.
Typical Welsh Baccalaureate offerWBQ core will be accepted in lieu of one A-level (at the grades specified above), excluding English Literature or English Language and Literature, or Creative Writing for English Literature degrees.
Typical International Baccalaureate offer35 points, 6 points each required from English and one other subject, both at higher level.
Other qualificationsApplications from those offering alternative qualifications are welcome. Please see detailed admissions and selection criteria for more information.

Detailed alternative entry requirements are available for this course.
QAA subject benchmark

Philosophy and Religious Studies/Theology 

Admissions tutor(s)

Mrs Anna Yarnell, Course Administrator

Dr Louise Child, Admissions Tutor

Dr Megan Leitch, Admissions Tutor

Important Legal Information: The programme information currently being published in Course Finder is under review and may be subject to change. The final programme information is due to be published by May 2016 and will be the definitive programme outline which the University intends to offer. Applicants are advised to check the definitive programme information after the update, to ensure that the programme meets their needs.

This is a three-year degree programme comprising of some core modules that provide essential skills and training as well as a wide variety of optional modules for you to select from in order to tailor your degree to meet your interests.

The degree provides the training necessary for students who wish to study English Literature or Religious Studies at postgraduate level, and a valuable range of intellectual and transferable skills for students who enter other professions.

Year one

You will take 40 credits in English Literature, 40 credits in Religious Studies and 40 credits in another Humanities subject which may be from with either School or an associate School.

Students of this course can choose to study modules outside of their allocated School(s) core and optional modules. These can be chosen from modules from participating Academic Schools.

Year two

In Year 2, you take 60 credits of English Literature modules and 60 credits of Religious Studies modules.

Module titleModule codeCredits
Elementary Sanskrit IRT120120 credits
Elementary Sanskrit IIRT120220 credits
Classical Hebrew 1RT220120 credits
Classical Hebrew IIRT220220 credits
Beliefs in the CrucibleRT520420 credits
Christian 'Church' Today: Its Meaning, Life and MissionRT520520 credits
Theology On The Edge: Christian Thought in A Changing WorldRT531520 credits
Christian Social Ethics TodayRT731720 credits
Understanding Christian WorshipRT432020 credits
Elementary Arabic IRT120320 credits
Elementary Arabic IIRT120420 credits
Arabic Texts IRT131020 credits
Arabic Texts IIRT131120 credits
Fiction of The Indian SubcontinentSE228320 credits
Creative Writing ISE241720 credits
Majority World Voices: Global South TheologiesRT734220 credits
Shakespeare and Renaissance DramaSE244220 credits
Reading Old EnglishSE244120 credits
Elizabethan ShakespeareSE244320 credits
Modernist FictionsSE244520 credits
Modern Welsh Writing in EnglishSE244820 credits
Twentieth-Century Crime FictionSE245520 credits
Introduction to Romantic PoetrySE245020 credits
Buddhism: The First Thousand YearsRT122720 credits
Early Hindu Texts in SanskritRT132820 credits
The Life of the BuddhaRT135220 credits
Modernism and the CitySE246320 credits
The Post-1945 American NovelSE256620 credits
Imaginary Journeys: More to HuxleySE245720 credits
Introduction to Visual CultureSE246120 credits
Hellenistic Greek IRT320120 credits
Hellenistic Greek IIRT320220 credits
Early HinduismRT133820 credits
Open Choice TranslationRT134920 credits
Contemporary Women's WritingSE244620 credits
History of EnglishSE139820 credits
African-American LiteratureSE245120 credits
Children's Literature: Form & FunctionSE244720 credits
Emotions, Symbols, and Rituals: Studying Societies Through FilmRT121520 credits
Islam in the Contemporary WorldRT132720 credits
Bodies, Spirits, and Souls: The Person, Ethics, and ReligionRT133920 credits
Religion in the WorkplaceRT135420 credits
The Most Famous Hindu Text: Bhagavadgita, Text & ContextRT135520 credits
Foundational EthicsRT135620 credits
God, Good and the Ugly: Topics in Applied Islamic EthicsRT135720 credits
Medieval Church in the Latin WestRT135820 credits
Exploring GnosticismRT135920 credits
Understanding Muslim ScripturesRT136020 credits
Hebrew TextsRT230420 credits
Ancient, Mediaeval and Modern JudaismRT230620 credits
New Testament Gospels and ActsRT320720 credits
New Testament Greek Texts IIRT332720 credits
History of Christian Spirituality 1550 - Present DayRT432120 credits
Money, Sex and Power in the Early ChurchRT432520 credits
Fictive Histories/Historical FictionsSE246720 credits
Gothic Fiction: The Romantic AgeSE246820 credits
Social Politics and National Style: American Fiction and Form 1920-1940SE247020 credits
Ways of ReadingSE244920 credits
Romanticism, Politics, AestheticsSE246920 credits
The Robin Hood TraditionSE236720 credits

Year three

In Year 3, you take 60 credits of English Literature modules and 60 credits of Religious Studies modules. If you wish, you can write a dissertation on a topic of your choice in either discipline.

Module titleModule codeCredits
Elementary Sanskrit IRT120120 credits
Elementary Sanskrit IIRT120220 credits
Classical Hebrew 1RT220120 credits
Classical Hebrew IIRT220220 credits
Hellenistic Greek IRT320120 credits
Hellenistic Greek IIRT320220 credits
Beliefs in the CrucibleRT520420 credits
Christian 'Church' Today: Its Meaning, Life and MissionRT520520 credits
Theology On The Edge: Christian Thought in A Changing WorldRT531520 credits
Open Choice DissertationRT731620 credits
Christian Social Ethics TodayRT731720 credits
Understanding Christian WorshipRT432020 credits
Elementary Arabic IRT120320 credits
Elementary Arabic IIRT120420 credits
Arabic Texts IRT131020 credits
Arabic Texts IIRT131120 credits
Creative Writing III: Special TopicsSE237320 credits
HitchcockSE254420 credits
DissertationSE252420 credits
Creative Writing II: Special TopicsSE237020 credits
Open Choice TranslationRT134920 credits
Majority World Voices: Global South TheologiesRT734220 credits
Love, Death and Marriage in Renaissance LiteratureSE258320 credits
French TheorySE257020 credits
Second-generation Romantic PoetsSE258220 credits
Desire, the Body and the Text: Psychoanalysis & LiteratureSE258020 credits
Utopia: Suffrage to CyberpunkSE258120 credits
Buddhism: The First Thousand YearsRT122720 credits
Early Hindu Texts in SanskritRT132820 credits
The Life of the BuddhaRT135220 credits
Writing Caribbean SlaverySE256820 credits
Early HinduismRT133820 credits
Gender & Monstrosity: Late/Neo VictorianSE256420 credits
Interwar Experiments: Sex, Gender, StyleSE258420 credits
Middle English Romance: Monsters and MagicSE258620 credits
International Study Abroad (60 credits) AutumnSE625160 credits
International Study Abroad (60 credits) SpringSE625260 credits
Bluestockings, Britannia, Unsex'd Females: Women in public life, 1770 - 1800SE258820 credits
Gothic Fiction: The VictoriansSE258920 credits
Modern British Political DramaSE259020 credits
Norse Myth and SagaSE256020 credits
Canterbury Tales: Genre, History, InterpretationSE257920 credits
Four English Poets of the Twentieth CenturySE259120 credits
Poetry in the Making: Modern Literary ManuscriptsSE259220 credits
Postcolonial TheorySE259320 credits
Shakespeare's Late PlaysSE259420 credits
Emotions, Symbols, and Rituals: Studying Societies Through FilmRT121520 credits
Islam in the Contemporary WorldRT132720 credits
Bodies, Spirits, and Souls: The Person, Ethics, and ReligionRT133920 credits
Religion in the WorkplaceRT135420 credits
The Most Famous Hindu Text: Bhagavadgita, Text & ContextRT135520 credits
Foundational EthicsRT135620 credits
God, Good and the Ugly: Topics in Applied Islamic EthicsRT135720 credits
Medieval Church in the Latin WestRT135820 credits
Exploring GnosticismRT135920 credits
Understanding Muslim ScripturesRT136020 credits
New Testament Gospels and ActsRT320720 credits
New Testament Greek Texts IIRT332720 credits
History of Christian Spirituality 1550 - Present DayRT432120 credits
Money, Sex and Power in the Early ChurchRT432520 credits
Hebrew TextsRT230420 credits
Ancient, Mediaeval and Modern JudaismRT230620 credits
Visions of Past and Future in Children's LiteratureSE259520 credits
Medical FictionsSE259620 credits
Military Masculinities in the Long Nineteenth CenturySE259720 credits
The Graphic MemoirSE140920 credits
Nineteenth-Century Crime FictionSE239020 credits
R. S. Thomas: No Truce with the FuriesSE257820 credits
The University is committed to providing a wide range of module options where possible, but please be aware that whilst every effort is made to offer choice this may be limited in certain circumstances. This is due to the fact that some modules have limited numbers of places available, which are allocated on a first-come, first-served basis, while others have minimum student numbers required before they will run, to ensure that an appropriate quality of education can be delivered; some modules require students to have already taken particular subjects, and others are core or required on the programme you are taking. Modules may also be limited due to timetable clashes, and although the University works to minimise disruption to choice, we advise you to seek advice from the relevant School on the module choices available.

We have a supportive learning environment, where students are enabled to acquire a range of skills and a wealth of specialist knowledge.

Our programmes foster intellectual skills, such as critical thinking, close analysis, evaluating evidence, constructing arguments, using theory, and the effective deployment of language in writing and in debate. We also help you gain experience in team-working, independent research, and time management.

Teaching methods include lectures, seminars, practicals, field trips, and one-to-one tutorials. You will also undertake independent study and research, with guidance from tutors. 

A range of formative and summative assessment methods are used, including essays, examinations, presentations, portfolios, and creative assignments.

School of English, Communication and Philosophy
In 2013/14, 91% of the School's graduates who were available for work reported they were in employment and/or further study within six months of graduation.

School of History, Archaeology and Religion
In 2013/14, 92% of the School's graduates who were available for work reported they were in employment and/or further study within six months of graduation.

Duration

3 Year(s)

Next intake

September 2016

Places available

Typical places available

Applications received

Typical applications received

 

 

Accreditations

QAA subject benchmark

QAA subject benchmark

Philosophy and Religious Studies/Theology 

What are the aims of this Programme?

The BA in Religious Studies and Philosophy gives students the opportunity to study the most general questions about reality, knowledge and ethics in Philosophy whilst developing a critical understanding of Religious Studies with relevance to the historical development of religions in contemporary societies.

Philosophy combines breadth of content with the flexibility required for students to pursue specific interests and to specialise if they want to.You will study morality including applied ethics, normative ethics andmetaethics; political philosophy including political issues and the legitimacy of political institutions; the philosophical aesthetics of art, music and literature; the nature of mind, thought, language and action; the fundamental nature of reality; the nature of knowledge. You will do this through studying some of the most influential writings in Western literature.

Religious Studies encourages you to explore religions and theologies in relation to a wide range of historical, theoretical, and social issues, and according to a range of methodological approaches (incl. textual hermeneutics, language study, gender theories, cultural and theoretical anthropology, conflict studies, media, globalisation etc).  Students have the opportunity to study a wide range of religious traditions including:  Christianity, Islam, Judaism, Hinduism and Buddhism. 

What is expected of me?

Students are expected to attend and participate in the lectures and seminars for all modules on which they are enrolled.  In line with University policy, attendance will be monitored at specific ‘points of engagement’ throughout the year.  Students with good cause to be absent should inform the member of staff who convenes module, who will provide the necessary support.  Students with extenuating circumstances should submit the Extenuating Circumstances Form in accordance with the School’s procedures.

The total number of hours which students are expected to devote to each 20-credit module is 200.  Of these, 30 hours will be contact hours with staff (lectures and seminars); the remaining 170 hours should be spent on self-directed learning for that module (reading, preparation for seminars, research, reflection, formative writing, assessed work, exam revision).

Students are expected to adhere to the Cardiff University policy on Dignity at Work and Study, which can be found here: http://www.cardiff.ac.uk/govrn/cocom/equalityanddiversity/dignityatwork/index.html

How is this Programme Structured?

The programme is studied full-time over three academic years.  360 credits are taken (120 credits per year).  Year 1 is a foundation year designed to equip you with the skills for advanced study and to give you an overview of the subjects that will enable you to make informed choices from the modules available in Year 2 and the Final Year. In Year 2 you select from a range of modules in which you will build on the foundation year, developing a solid understanding of the core areas of Philosophical inquiry and the study of Religion. In Final Year there is a range of more specialised modules in which you can pursue interests developed in the previous two years and engage with current issues in research and scholarship, enabling you further to develop analytical and presentational skills that employers will value, as well as equipping you for postgraduate study.

You will take up to three subjects in the first year which must include Philosophy (40 credits) and Religious Studies (40 credits), with the balance of credits chosen from one other subject block (the choices available include Theology and a range of classical source languages of Religious Studies such as Greek, Hebrew, Arabic and Sanskrit).  The second and third years consist of 120 credits per year chosen from the range of Philosophy and Religious Studies optional modules for that particular year of study.  Joint honours students must take 60 credits in each department in their second and third years.  Students must pass each academic year before being allowed to proceed. 

Will I need any specific equipment to study this Programme?

No specific equipment is required.

What skills will I practise and develop?

Please see Learning Outcomes

How will I be taught?

A diverse range of learning and teaching styles is used throughout the programme. Students will attend lectures using a wide variety of sources such as texts, images, film, music, drama.The lectures are supported by seminars, where the smaller group sizes encourage acquisition of more specialized knowledge, understanding and skills using methods such as group work and discussion, oral presentations and source criticism.  Students also attend tutorials (personal one-to-one meetings with a lecturer) and are expected to study independently in preparation for each session.

Each one-hour seminar requires six to eight hours of preparation; in the seminar itself you will use the knowledge acquired during the preparatory time to present and test your arguments. In the process, you will receive feedback on your ideas and arguments from lecturers and fellow students. In your essays you will combine a range of sources – sometimes contradictory – into a coherent argument using evidence from a range of scholarly and academic sources.  You will receive individual feedback on your essays from lecturers.

Core modules in Year One usually comprise of two weekly lectures, supplemented by seminars in small groups. In Year Two, and especially Year Three, the emphasis shifts further towards seminar work. In total, you would be expected to work 35-40 hours per week.

All of the taught modules within the programme in Years 2 and 3 are optional.  In the Final Year students can choose to write a dissertation on a topic of their choice (subject to supervisory availability and approval of the title by the Board of Studies). 

How will I be assessed?

Formative assessment is provided as feedback on coursework through written comments and individual discussion and on oral seminar presentations through individual guidance.

Summative assessment for most modules takes place through one or more of the following methods: unseen examinations; open book examinations; portfolios of essays; and (if chosen) the dissertation.  The form(s) of summative assessment for individual modules are set out in the relevant module description.  Assessment methods are chosen as most appropriate to elicit the skills, knowledge and competencies developed by the module.  Not all skills are assessed directly (e.g. the accurate and clear oral communication of concept and theories).  However, opportunities are made available for the development of such skills in seminar presentations, and their value is emphasised to students.  Details of any academic or competence standards which may limit the availability of adjustments or alternative assessments for students with disabilities are documented in the Module Descriptions. 

How will I be supported?

What are the Learning Outcomes of this Programme?

  • Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of important concepts, theories, problems and arguments in the main areas of Philosophy, such as metaphysics, epistemology, philosophy of mind, logic, moral philosophy and, political philosophy.
  • Demonstrate familiarity with the ideas and arguments of some of the major philosophers in the history of the subject, encountered in their own writings.
  • Demonstrate awareness of some major issues currently at the frontiers of philosophical debate and research.
  • Display precision of thought and expression in the analysis and formulation of complex and controversial problems.
  • Construct and justify arguments whileforming independent, fair and well-supported assessments of conflicting views and opinions.
  • Explore critically beliefs and values, and question their presuppositions.
  • Appreciate the diversity of competing theories, and of competing interpretations of theories and texts, in Philosophy and Religious Studies.
  • Apply philosophical concepts, theories, arguments and methods to some of the major problems, both theoretical and practical, facing human reflection, life and society.
  • Demonstrate critical understanding of religious traditions on the basis of source material from different religious traditions and of modern discourses on religion.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of the diversity of religions in a global context, in history and in the present.
  • Demonstrate a general understanding of the various approaches adopted by Religious Studies and Theology to the study of religious traditions and theologies.
  • Develop an awareness of the different theories of religion, but also critically assess the limits of knowledge that can be achieved about religion.  

Other information

RELIGIOUS STUDIES

In order to encourage students to apply their learning to the world outside of the University, the school has a dedicated Work Placements Officer who supports students with accessing a wide range of work experience opportunities both in and out of term time. This together with additional career related workshops and the department’s academic programme, students will begin to develop a range of discipline-specific skills that employers now demand. Students learn to assess critically a body of knowledge, to develop hypotheses, test them against qualitative and quantitative evidence, and present conclusions both in writing and orally. They learn to work both independently and as part of a team. Students have the opportunity to study abroad during the second (as an exception also in the third) year through the Erasmus programme. The University-wide ‘Languages for All’ programme will allow students to study a foreign language free of charge alongside their degree programme.

The department has developed an e-portfolio for students to identify and store their academic and non-academic progress in order to demonstrate their successes to future placement providers and potential employers during their second and third year of study.

To support our students with settling into university and academic life as quickly as possible we have a student mentoring scheme where new students are buddied up with second and third year students. This is where academic and non-academic concerns can be discussed in a safe and informal environment and many fears can be allayed.    

Admissions tutors

Mrs Anna Yarnell, Course Administrator

Dr Louise Child, Admissions Tutor

Dr Megan Leitch, Admissions Tutor


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