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Geography and Planning

The School of Geography and Planning is pleased to offer a range of standalone postgraduate modules.

They address contemporary policy and research issues. Aimed at professionals working in planning, logistics, transport and sustainability.

This module will provide an in-depth analysis of the different forms of eco-city development (from new build, to retrofitting, to informal development) and it will analyse by which processes eco-cities emerge. Debates will include understanding the terms that are used as alternatives or synonyms to the term ‘eco-cities’ including low carbon city, smart city, or transition city to distil the distinctiveness of eco-cities.

Dates

Autumn semester (Mondays 14:00 - 18:00)

Module fee

£928

On completion of the module a student should be able to

  • Elaborate and critically discuss the range and variety of different eco-city development based on theoretical concepts and in depth study of case examples.
  • Distinguish how “meanings of eco-city” differ in a range of geographical settings.
  • Offer a critical evaluation of the achievements of eco-developments.

How the module will be delivered

The module will be delivered by a combination of:

  • lectures.
  • seminars.
  • directed reading.

Syllabus content

The module will begin by assessing how eco-development differs from conventional development. It will then evaluate the contribution that different forms of eco-development can make to more sustainable living. This will then lead into an analysis of who promotes key terms such as ‘low carbon, ‘intelligent development’, ‘smart cities’ and ‘transition towns’ and the development logics that they imply. The module also brings out the way in which professional groups (e.g. planners, engineers), economic interests and citizens play a greater or lesser role in eco-developments.

Throughout the module key themes will be drawn out through the use of extended case studies of eco-developments (such as the Sino-Singapore Tianjin Eco-City, Freiburg in Germany and Copenhagen in Denmark).

The purpose of this module is to provide a theoretically informed base from which to analyse the nature and variety of forms of governance that characterise eco and low carbon developments around the world. It does so by examining conceptual approaches to governance – the interactions between public and private sectors and citizens.

Dates

Spring semester (Tuesdays 09:00 - 12:00)

Module fee

£928

On completion of the module a student should be able to

  • Critically appreciate key approaches to governance.
  • The process of ‘steering’ development in a variety of settings.
  • The ways in which key actors construct notions of ‘eco’ and low carbon development.
  • Evaluate key debates in eco-city and low carbon city developments.
  • Demonstrate a good understanding of the interactions between key actors in the delivery of eco-developments.

How the module will be delivered

The module will be delivered by a combination of:

  • lectures
  • seminars structured around key contemporary debates
  • directed reading.

Syllabus content

The module will cover: critical perspectives on governance and urban development, and the nature of governance in different settings (for example, Europe and Asia). This will provide the basis for exploring how citizens, governments and economic actors interact to construct ideas (e.g. through the use of indicators) of eco-city development. The module will then go on to explore how these actors deliver a range of eco-developments, and how bundles of technologies (e.g. for transport) and design can become labelled as ‘eco’ and why the label eco matters in the development process. The module will conclude by assessing how different models of governance can best deliver eco-city development.

A major contemporary challenge is to achieve a shift towards more sustainable systems of energy provision. Renewable energy sources are a key ingredient of such transitions, but delivering an expansion of renewable energy raises big issues for the relationship between society, energy, government and the landscape. This places planning in a pivotal position, and it is the role of this module to develop an advanced understanding of the roles that planning can perform.

Dates

Autumn semester (Mondays 14:00 - 18:00)

Module fee

£928

On completion of the module a student should be able to

  • Understand the various factors shaping the emergence and expansion of different renewable energy technologies, including resource availability and market structures.
  • Evaluate the effectiveness of key planning strategies for promoting renewable energy (zoning, centralisation, and bottom-up strategies like opportunities mapping).
  • Develop a nuanced understanding of society-energy relations, as revealed and shaped by planning, including the limits of ‘NIMBY’ concepts, and ways of fostering better societal engagement.
  • To evaluate the merits of different renewable energy pathways, those based on large-scale centralised infrastructures and more decentralised systems.

How the module will be delivered

The module will be delivered by a combination of:

  • lectures
  • seminars
  • directed reading
  • group work.

Syllabus content

This module examines the role of planning in shaping renewable energy development. After introducing students to key technologies, trends and patterns in the development of renewable energy – organised with theories of ‘transition pathways’ – the module covers the following: an outline and analysis of the conventional role of planning in renewable energy decision-making; the role of zoning strategies and new infrastructure decision-making regimes; the role of planning and other actions, such as fostering community-ownership, in fostering wider societal support for renewable energy; more radical energy planning ideas, such as the pursuit of 100% renewable energy regions.

This module introduces students to a set of analytical approaches which are frequently used in transport planning practice. This includes analysis of travel behaviour which aims to provide an introduction to research designs and strategies for understanding travel behaviour, acquisition and analysis of relevant data through practical exercises and transport surveys for collecting primary data. Particular emphasis is given on transport surveys for collecting revealed and stated preferences, which have been prominent in travel behaviour research. Designing such surveys and analysing the data they generate form an important part of this module.

Dates

Autumn semester (Tuesdays 09:00 - 12:00)

Module fee

£928

On completion of the module a student should be able to

  • Describe the different approaches to travel behaviour research and ability to critique them.
  • Design and plan a quantitative survey while being able to identify potential areas of risk to quality.
  • Distinguish and explain the differences between Revealed and Stated Preference data.
  • Critically explain the strengths and weaknesses of revealed and stated preference data.
  • Process and organise  survey data (using statistical software).
  • Formulate hypotheses in travel-behaviour survey data.
  • Test hypotheses using statistical software and interpret the findings.
  • Choose appropriate statistical and graphical methods to model survey data and interpret the results.

How the module will be delivered

The module will be delivered by a combination of:

  • lectures
  • seminars
  • computer lab practical sessions.

Syllabus content

  • qpproaches to travel behaviour
  • travel data acquisition
  • transport surveys/questionnaires (revealed and stated preferences)
  • travel data analysis; Practical One: Introduction to SPSS
  • travel data analysis; Practical Two: Hypothesis Testing using IBM SPSS Statistics 20
  • travel data analysis; Practical Three: Using regression methods to model questionnaire data IBM SPSS Statistics 20.

This module explores the role of food in delivering the objectives of sustainable development. Through the prism of food, the module addresses key critical questions on resource shortfalls, environmental pressures and social development. Drawing on the perspectives of different actors in the food chain –producers, retailers, consumers, regulators and campaigners, the module explores the scope for (and the limits to) the development of food systems that promote sustainability outcomes, with a focus on both developing and developed countries.

Dates

Spring semester (Tuesdays 09:00 - 13:00)

Module fee

£928

On completion of the module a student should be able to

  • Demonstrate in-depth knowledge of how and why socio-economic development and environmental integrity are relevant in food production, consumption and disposal
  • Demonstrate a critical understanding of why food origins, production methods and consumption patterns are at the forefront of debates on sustainable development
  • Appreciate and systematically understand the different adjustments actors in food chains are making in order to align their role and actions to the new issues, policies and practices surrounding sustainable development
  • Critically consider the extent of these changes; and evaluate the potential impact of them on academic debate and assess the prospects of sustainable food systems in practice

How the module will be delivered

The module will be delivered by a combination of:

  • lectures
  • seminars
  • guest speakers
  • 'live' project work.

Syllabus content

  • sustainability in the food system
  • sustainable urban foodscapes
  • sustainability in food production
  • supermarkets, globalization and the Low-carbon Economy
  • farmers’ markets, CSA and solidarity purchasing groups
  • addressing sustainability in the context of food security
  • rethinking urban-rural linkages through sustainable food systems

This module considers the complexities involved in meeting society’s mobility needs whilst minimising negative impacts associated with surface transport. The module has three main focii: 1) understanding the environmental, social and economic impacts of different transport modes; 2) identifying and evaluating the efficacy of different sustainable transport solutions; 3) exploring the social, environmental and ethical consequences of different policy, behavioural, spatial and technological solutions for achieving more sustainable transport. In addressing the first two, it provides an overview of the UK transport policy landscape; introduces the nature and measurement of environmental externalities; considers methods for forecasting and costing environmental impacts from the movement of people and goods and outlines the process of transport project evaluation in the UK context.

Dates

Autumn semester (Wednesdays 10:00 - 13:00)

Module fee

£928

On completion of the module a student should be able to:

  • Define the main environmental, social and economic impacts of a range of transport modes and spatial arrangements.
  • Identify and critically evaluate the main components of transport project appraisal.
  • Assess the social, distributional and ethical impacts of a range of sustainable transport policies.
  • Examine the efficacy of solutions at a range of scales and in different political and national contexts.

How the module will be delivered

The module will be delivered by a combination of:

  • lectures
  • seminars
  • guest speakers
  • 'live' project work.

Syllabus content

  • Introduction to the sustainable mobility paradigm.
  • Overview of UK and international sustainable transport policy process and responses.
  • Measurement and monitoring of environmental effects and problem identification, with particular reference to local pollutants.
  • Environmental forecasting and impact prediction: the practical use of models for forecasting noise and air quality.
  • Evaluation of transport project appraisal (e.g. DfT New Approach to Appraisal (NATA).
  • Consultation and participation in sustainability planning.
  • Assessing resource efficiency and behaviour change as the basis for sustainable transport.
  • Evaluating the contribution of active travel.
  • The role of spatial planning in sustainable transport policies.

Applicants should apply using the module application form.

Standalone module application form

Standalone module application form

21 March 2019

We aim to process your application as quickly as possible.

PDF

Equal opportunities monitoring form

Equal opportunities monitoring form

21 March 2019

To monitor the effectiveness of our equal opportunities policy, we require applicants to provide the information outlined in this form.

PDF

Please contact the CPD Unit for further guidance on the application process.

Continuing Professional Development Unit