Skip to content

Engineering

We are pleased to offer a selection of postgraduate taught modules that can be taken on an individual basis.

These modules are suitable for engineering graduates or experienced practitioners who are looking to upskill or further their career, and who are happy to study alongside full-programme MSc students.

The modules on offer span a range of engineering topics, from civil and water engineering, wireless and microwave communication, structural engineering, and electrical energy systems to compound semiconductor electronics.

Credits

10 credit module (reference ENT710)

Dates

Spring Semester. Please contact us for the latest timetable information

Cost

£500 for UK/EU students.

Assessment

100% exam based.

Outline description

  • To introduce the concept of sediment motion from its initiation into motion through bed transport to motion by suspension
  • To introduce well-recognised approaches and equations to describe the initiation of sediment, bed load transport and total load transport
  • To present applications of the approaches relevant to hydraulic engineering problems.

Objectives

On completion of the module a student should be able to:

  • define a sediment and its properties
  • explain the key principles of initiation of sediment motion
  • explain the transport mechanisms
  • explain the geometry of fluvial channels including large-scale features and bed features
  • outline the key principles of bed and total load formulae
  • explain the validity of formulae and apply formulae to the appropriate situation
  • explain measurement techniques used to quantify bed and suspended load transport
  • explain the application of sediment transport theory to fluvial and coastal engineering problems

Delivery

A combination of lectures and example classes are used to explain the principles of sediment transport dynamics, to develop the student’s understanding of the subject matter and relevance to hydraulic engineering problems. The student is expected to attempt and complete the tutorial sheets issued throughout the module in preparation for the relevant example class and to broaden his/her understanding of relevant hydraulic applications.

Successful completion of all the tutorial sheets, examples given in class and background reading around the subject will help the student towards meeting the learning outcomes.

Skills development

  • Apply the principles of initiation of motion to engineering design.
  • Apply appropriate sediment transport formulae to determine sediment discharge.
  • Apply techniques to determine the transport mechanisms.
  • Acquire an appreciation of erosion and sedimentation problems and what steps can be taken to overcome these specific problems.
  • Acquire an appreciation of the application of the theory to fluvial and coastal situations

Assessment

This module is assessed by a two-hour examination. The examination paper consists of four questions and students are required to answer three questions. The examination ensures that the students can demonstrate that they have met the learning outcomes. There is a potential for re-assessment in this module which may result in a 100% written assessment during the August Resit period.

Syllabus content

  • Properties of water and sediments
  • Variables used in sediment transport dynamics and the use of flumes to investigate sediment transport
  • Initiation of particle motion
  • Geometry of fluvial channels including large-scale features and bed features
  • Transport mechanisms, bed load and suspended sediment transport
  • Bed load and total load transport equations
  • Measurement techniques used for bed load and suspended load determination
  • Riverine sediment transport
  • An introduction to cohesive sediments and estuarine sedimentation
  • Coastal sediment transport

Credits

10 credit module (reference ENT713)

Dates

Spring Semester. Please contact us for the latest timetable information.

Cost

£500 for UK/EU students.

Assessment

70% exam, 30% lab reports.

Outline description

  • To introduce the principles of micro- and nano-scale fabrication in the context of electronic devices and integrated circuit (IC) technology. Application of basic principles to the design and realisation of devices and IC based problems in current and future systems
  • To develop an appreciation of the way in which materials’ electronic properties and state-of-the-art technology is used to enhance devices and IC performance and also develop new applications
  • To develop an appreciation of self-assembly techniques and introduce the concept of 'bottom up' design including electronic devices layout design

Objectives

On completion of the module a student should be able to:

  • appreciate the application of the design rules and methodology for realising a range of micro- and nano-scale structures and devices, and also how processes are combined to create integrated circuits (IC)

Delivery

A combination of lectures and layout design labs sessions using industry-standard design software are used to explore the principles that underpin electronic devices and IC technology, and how real systems are fabricated and tested.

As well as lecture notes, the students will be issued with a range of material including videos and web-links throughout the semester. This material will allow students to identify real engineering problems and gain an insight into the diverse range of applications that feature micro/nano-technology. State-of-the-art applications will be the focus of the discussion sessions, thus promoting research-led teaching

Skills development

  • Recognise the limits of present-day technology, and appreciate innovative ways of overcoming limitations
  • Apply the principles of micro- and nano-scale fabrication techniques to a range of familiar and unfamiliar engineering problems
  • Analyse simple and complex micro/nano-scale structures and appreciate the limits of this technology

Syllabus content

  • General concept of micro and nano fabrication
  • The development of electronic devices and IC micro and nano technology
  • Basic resume of semiconductor physics
  • Materials for electronic devices and ICs
  • Electronic device and IC layout design
  • The role of metals, insulators and semiconductors
  • Material and device evaluation
  • Type conversion in semiconductors
  • Photolithography
  • E-beam lithography
  • Materials etching – methodology and processes
  • Realisation of micro/nano-scale structures
  • Metalisation and insulation
  • Mask production
  • Technology requirements for high-speed electronics up to THz for radar and sensing applications
  • Technology requirements for high-power electronics for 5G applications

Credits

10 credit module (reference ENT610)

Dates

Autumn Semester. Please contact us for the latest timetable information.

Cost

£500 for UK/EU students

Assessment

100% exam based

Outline description

This module will aim to develop the students’ understanding of the factors affecting the performance and design of three terminal high frequency devices based on Compound Semiconductors, namely HFETs and HBTs. Material systems considered will include gallium arsenide (GaAs), indium phosphide (InP) and gallium nitride (GaN).

Objectives

On completion of the module a student should be able to:

  • Understand the factors driving the development of high frequency three terminal devices based on Compound Semiconductors
  • HFETs: Understand the concept and role of modulation doping in device operation
  • HBTs: Understand the concept and bandgap and carrier transit in device operation
  • Have a basic knowledge of physical models used both HFETs and HBTs
  • Have a full knowledge of how these physical models can be transformed into equivalent circuit models

Delivery

This module will be taught via 10 lectures and 2 tutorials.

Skills development

  • Understanding of the operation of three terminal Compound Semiconductor electronic devices
  • Ability to engage in the design of such transistors
  • Appreciation of the modelling techniques used

Syllabus content

  • The basic device, operational physics and structure will be reviewed and the factors limiting their high frequency performance discussed; electron velocity, transit time, etc.
  • The role of heterojunctions in improving their high frequency performance will be addressed:
    • Role of Modulation doping in HFETs
    • Role of current transport across heterojunctions in HBTs
  • Device modelling will be addressed both from physical modelling and equivalent circuit model perspective

Credits

10 credit module (reference ENT743)

Dates

Autumn Semester. Please contact us for the latest timetable information.

Cost

£500 for Home/EU students.

Assessment:

70% exam, 30% written assessment

Outline description

  • To understand the concept of sustainability in the context of building design
  • To understand impacts of the built environment on the natural environment
  • To understand how building designs can minimise/reduce use of global resources strategies for energy efficiency in buildings

Objectives

On completion of the module a student should be able to:

  • argue for choice of building materials based on environmental impact

Delivery

The module is divided into ten inter-related subjects. These subjects begin at the general level with topics on global and construction sustainability, before going into applicatory subjects (technologies), and ending with synthesis (case studies).

The module is designed with the focus of learning primarily in student preparation and participation in weekly seminars, whereas the weekly hour-long lectures serve only as a stimulus to invigorate debate in the seminars. A large volume of selected material is provided through the module web-site for guided learning

Students are expected to attend the 36 hours of scheduled contact time

Skills development

Practical skills developed in the module include the ability to:

  • evaluate and demonstrate principles of environmental impact assessment and life-cycle cost of buildings
  • propose energy efficient alternatives in a building refurbishment project
  • estimate effects of design parameters on energy efficiency in the three areas of lighting, heating and cooling
  • critically appraise scholarly value in presentations according to a given criteria

Syllabus content

  • Introduction to sustainable building design.
  • Environmental impact of building materials.
  • Life cycle costing; embodied energy in building materials; renewable materials; recycled materials; environmental construction impact; demolition and refurbishment.
  • Energy efficiency in buildings (including case studies).
  • Lighting: Factors affecting daylight in buildings; room shapes; window shape, size and position; daylight factors; daylight distribution and uniformity; combination of artificial and daylighting.
  • Heating: Heating cycle; passive solar technology; solar gains; heat storage strategies; overheating.
  • Cooling: Natural ventilation, air circulation routes; evaporative cooling; chilled beams; aquifer systems

Credits

10 credit module (reference ENT799

Dates

Spring Semester. Please contact us for the latest timetable information.

Cost

£500 for UK/EU students

Assessment

60% exam, 40% written assessment

Outline description

This module focuses on the two most industry-relevant CAD tools, their advanced features, and how these can be used in modern-day microwave circuit design. Following this, the concepts, principles of operation and the architectures of key measurement instruments are discussed and practiced. In addition, modern microwave circuit fabrication and prototyping techniques are explored, and then all of these techniques used in the design, construction and test of real microwave circuits.

The module also provides access to current, mainstream international industry in the field of Wireless and Microwave Communications, through a variety of industry-led events, including lectures and tutorials.

Objectives

On completion of the module students should be able to:

  • explore advanced features of modern microwave engineering CAD tools
  • understand the concepts, principles of operation, and the architectures behind the important wireless and microwave measurement instruments and techniques used in industry today
  • know how to operate these instruments and understand how measured data can be used in the design, build and test development cycle
  • know about the different types of modern-day microwave circuits
  • gain experience in modern microwave circuit fabrication and prototyping techniques
  • gain access to mainstream international industry in the field of Wireless and Microwave Communications, through a variety of industry-led focus events, lectures and tutorials
  • appreciate the strengths and weaknesses of the industry-recognised CAD tools available to wireless and microwave engineers today
  • understand the extent of advanced capabilities offered by these modern-day CAD tools
  • using these tools, develop competency in co-simulation, schematic capture, schematic simulation, electro-magnetic (EM) simulation, model generation, optimisation and visualisation
  • develop an awareness of sources of error, and the difficulties involved in measurement at very high (microwave and mm-wave) frequencies
  • develop an awareness of typical Microwave Measurement tools and instruments used by RF/Microwave engineers in industry today, what they do, how they are used, how they provide measurement information.

Delivery

This module consists of 16 one-hour lectures, two one-hour tutorials and six hours of CAD and measurement laboratory. Additional laboratory time is reserved to provide design problem guidance.

Skills development

  • Understand how measured data can be employed in the CAD environment and incorporated into design process - turning initial design ideas into reality.
  • Understand microwave characterisation and test techniques, and appreciate the difficulties involved in measuring active non-linear devices.
  • Understand modern microwave circuit fabrication techniques, including microwave milling and thru-hole plating, and to employ these in an actual design of a working microwave power amplifier.
  • Understand the role of CAD tools in the fabrication of actual microwave circuits

Syllabus content

  • Comparisons of modern-day microwave CAD tools (one lecture)
  • Advanced features of modern-day microwave CAD tools (two lectures, two hours labs)
  • The vector network analyser (two lectures and one tutorial)
  • The spectrum analyser (one lecture)
  • The noise figure meter (one lecture)
  • The vector signal analyser (one lecture)
  • Advanced microwave sources (one lecture)
  • Microwave device measurement and characterisation (two lectures and one tutorial)
  • Measurement based non-linear modelling (two lectures)
  • Modern microwave circuit fabrication (three lectures and four hours of labs)

Credits

10 credit module (reference ENT772)

Dates

Autumn Semester. Please contact us for the latest timetable information.

Cost

£500 for Home/EU students

Assessment

100% written assessment.

Outline description

  • To ensure that students from diverse backgrounds achieve a common foundation in the software tools and simulation techniques used within the research areas that contribute to the make-up of the MSc in Wireless and Microwave Communication Engineering.
  • To understand how these tools can be applied to real-life engineering problems

Objectives

On completion of the module a student should be able to:

  • know which software tools and simulation techniques are available to tackle the demanding nature of the subject areas covered within the MSc in Wireless and Microwave Communication Engineering.
  • continue, by using the available software tools, to develop understanding of the specialist studies provided within the MSc/MRes

Delivery

  • 12 one-hour lectures
  • 36 hours of laboratory activity

Skills development

  • Decide which software tool and simulation technique is best suited to realise an analysis or a design and to employ them to best effect, as required

Syllabus content

Introduction to the various industry-standard software tools and simulation techniques that are available to students as provided by the school for use within the research areas driving the content of the MSc/MRes.

Specifically, students will learn how to use the Agilent ADS simulation tool, and how this tool can be used to consider the design and analysis of simple radio-frequency amplifier circuits.

Many aspects of design will be considered, including schematic layout, harmonic balance simulation, investigation of non-linearity, sources and consequences of non-linear device operation, as well as an introduction to electromagnetic simulation techniques.

Credits

10 credit module (reference ENT775)

Dates

Autumn Semester. Please contact us for the latest timetable information.

Cost

£500 for Home/EU students.

Assessment

70% exam, 30% written assessment.

Outline description

  • To provide students with an understanding of the role of Distributed Generation (DG) schemes in electrical energy networks.
  • To provide students with an overview of Distributed Generation techniques of network integration.
  • Introduce students to the concept of intermittent power sources and their contribution to capacity in electrical power systems.
  • Provide a detailed review of voltage control and fault studies of Distributed Generation schemes

Objectives

On completion of the module a student should be able to:

  • demonstrate understanding of the main components of an electrical distribution network
  • demonstrate detailed knowledge of the main concepts and principles relating to distributed generation schemes and their application to electrical energy networks
  • recognise the impact of distributed generation on network performance
  • explain the main features of protection systems used in the distribution networks with distributed generation
  • understand the technical and economic factors which should be taken into account when designing distribution network extensions, particularly for distributed generation

Delivery

24 one-hour lectures

Skills development

  • Quantify the effect of distributed generation on voltage magnitude and fault levels.
  • Evaluate the major technical issues relating to the implementation of distributed generation schemes.
  • Identify methods used for overcoming voltage problems in networks with distributed generation.
  • Interpret the benefits that distributed generation may provide to a power distribution system.
  • Problem-solving specific problems associated with distributed generation.
  • Use computer software to solve load flows and fault calculations associated with distributed generation.
  • Exercise substantial independence and initiative in carrying out learning activities.
  • Manage time effectively, working with deadlines and prioritise workload.
  • Demonstrate independence in reporting and analysing results.
  • Communicate and participate in group activity and discussions in a variety of tasks.
  • Professional awareness of the role and potential of distributed generation in electrical energy networks

Syllabus content

  • Distributed Generation (DG) Definition and Terminology. Classification of DG Technologies
  • Distribution system components Generators
    • Synchronous Generators
    • Induction Generators
    • Doubly-Fed Induction Generators (DFIG)
  • Wind Turbines
    • The wind resource
    • Wind Energy Conversion Systems WECS and their electrical generators
  • Power Control of Wind Turbines
  • Distribution Networks with Distributed Generation
  • Voltage Control of Networks with DG
    • Managing the voltage rise effect by generation curtailment
    • Managing the voltage rise effect by reactive compensation
    • Managing the voltage rise effect using coordinated voltage control. Application of OLTCs and Voltage Regulators
    • Voltage management services, Ancillary services
  • Impact of DG on network fault levels
    • Fault Level contributions
    • Major methods of fault level reduction
  • Network evolution
    • Real and reactive power flow
    • DG power flow management
    • Ancillary services
  • Passive and active networks

Entry requirements

Applicants should possess a good first degree (typically a 2:1 or equivalent), or equivalent work experience in a relevant discipline.

Applicants whose first language is not English must meet the University's English Language requirements.

In order to apply, you must provide us with certificates and transcripts relating to previous qualifications, a personal statement, and (where applicable) proof of your English language proficiency.

How to apply

Applicants should complete the module application and equal opportunties forms and return these to the Contunining Professional Development Unit.

Please contact the Continuing Professional Development Unit for further guidance on the application process.

Standalone module application form

Standalone module application form

21 March 2019

We aim to process your application as quickly as possible.

PDF

Equal opportunities monitoring form

Equal opportunities monitoring form

21 March 2019

To monitor the effectiveness of our equal opportunities policy, we require applicants to provide the information outlined in this form.

PDF

Continuing Professional Development Unit