Journalism, Media and Cultural Studies

Learn more about the modules study abroad students can take at the School of Journalism, Media and Cultural Studies.

Module codeMC2107
LevelL5
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits20

This module is organised to provide a conceptual overview of feminist research approaches to contemporary media. Important
theoretical and methodological issues will be examined in relation to case studies to illustrate the media's role in the construction of
contemporary gender relations

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 50%
  • Written assessment: 50%
Module codeMC2616
LevelL5
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits20

Social Media, Politics, and Society aims to provide an accessible overview of the interplay between social media and social and political
processes by focusing on the ways in which different actors engage and interact with social media technologies. This will provide
students with an understanding of social media that focuses on the practices of social media in society and will give students concrete
examples of the social and political uses of social media within a broader context. It aims to outline the ways in which social and political
processes impact on the development of social media as well as the way in which social media impacts on social and political processes.
Looking at different groups of actors, from politicians to corporations to journalists to activists, the module covers some of the most
pressing debates on the impact of social media on society today.
The module starts by providing a historical context for our understanding of social media, outlining debates around the meaning of social
media, whether it represents anything that is genuinely new, and the cultural, political and economic processes that have underpinned its
development. The course then moves on to looking at social media uses and abuses, outlining key debates on social media practices,
from ‘e-government’ to ‘social branding’ to ‘crowd-sourcing’ to ‘digital activism’ and ‘hacktivism’. These concepts and debates are
supported by relevant examples and important case studies.

Assessment

  • Presentation: 30%
  • Written assessment: 60%
  • Oral/aural assessment: 10%
Module codeMC2617
LevelL5
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits20

Mae’r modiwl hwn trwy gyfrwng y Gymraeg yn unig.

 

Bydd myfyrwyr yn dysgu cyfuniad o sgiliau newyddiadurol ymarferol yn ogystal â dealltwriaeth ddyfnach o’r diwydiant a’i rôl o fewn cymdeithas. Mae’r modiwl wedi ei ddylunio ar ôl trafodaethau gyda’r diwydiant yng Nghymru ac adborth gan fyfyrwyr.

 

Mae’r modiwl yn gyflwyniad i unrhyw fyfyriwr sy’n gobeithio dilyn gyfra yn y maes, yn enwedig yng Nghymru, ond hefyd bydd o fudd i unrhyw un sydd â diddordeb ehangach ym maes y cyfryngau, newyddiaduraeth a gwleidyddiaeth. Bydd y modiwl yn cynnwys ymweliadau i leoliad gwaith perthnasol a phrofiad gwaith ymarferol megis ysgrifennu erthygl i wefan y rhaglen materion cyfoes Hacio.

 

Rydym yn argymell bod myfyrwyr yn astudio’r ddau fodiwl, sef Yr Ystafell Newyddion 1 ac Yr Ystafell Newyddion 2, oherwydd dilyniant naturiol y modiwlau a thestun eang y ddau. Dyw hi ddim yn orfodol i astudio’r ddau fodiwl gyda'i gilydd fodd bynnag.

 

Bydd y modiwl yn tynnu ar gysylltiadau ardderchog sydd eisoes yn bodoli rhwng y diwydiant a'r brifysgol, gan gynnwys y Cynulliad Cenedlaethol, BBC Cymru, ITV Cymru a chwmnïau lobio er mwyn sicrhau profiadau ystyrlon a pherthnasol i’r myfyrwyr.

 

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 30%
  • Written assessment: 30%
  • Written assessment: 40%
Module codeMC2618
LevelL5
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits20

 

Mae’r modiwl hwn trwy gyfrwng y Gymraeg yn unig.

 

Bydd myfyrwyr yn dysgu cyfuniad o sgiliau newyddiadurol ymarferol, trosglwyddadwy yn ogystal â dealltwriaeth ddyfnach o’r diwydiant a’i rôl o fewn cymdeithas.

 

Mae’r modiwl wedi ei ddylunio ar ôl trafodaethau gyda’r diwydiant yng Nghymru ac adborth gan fyfyrwyr ac mae’n ddilyniant naturiol i’r Ystafell Newyddion 1.

 

Mae’r modiwl yn addas i unrhyw fyfyriwr sy’n gobeithio dilyn gyfra ym maes newyddiaduraeth, yn enwedig yng Nghymru, ond hefyd o fudd i unrhyw un sydd â diddordeb ehangach ym maes y cyfryngau, newyddiaduraeth, cysylltiadau cyhoeddus a gwleidyddiaeth.

 

Fe fydd y modiwl yn cynnwys ymweliad i leoliad gwaith a gwaith ymarferol megis ysgrifennu erthygl. Bydd myfyrwyr hefyd yn dysgu am gyfathrebu a chysylltiadau cyhoeddus gan ymarfer sgiliau ymarferol ac academaidd yn y maes hwn.

 

Bydd y modiwl yn tynnu ar gysylltiadau ardderchog sydd eisoes yn bodoli rhwng y diwydiant a'r brifysgol, gan gynnwys y Cynulliad Cenedlaethol, BBC Cymru, ITV Cymru a chwmnïau lobio er mwyn sicrhau profiadau ystyrlon a pherthnasol i’r myfyrwyr.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 30%
  • Written assessment: 40%
  • Written assessment: 30%
Module codeMC2621
LevelL5
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits20

We are all born, we will all die, and many of us will marry, two of these are biological inevitabilities, and the third is presented in many
cultures as a ‘personal choice’.
But how does culture shape experiences and how do media representations promote one wayof ‘doing’ birth, death or marriage over
another and what happens at points of contestations?
This module introduces students to studying the media (its production, content and reception) through the lens of life transitions and the
choices we make about the way we live and judgments we make about alternatives.
Students are encouraged to debate and explore issues such as birth, marriage, death and issues such as ‘coma’ and end of life decision
makingin context of interdisciplinary work mapping out thecultural, sociological, and historical context of key aspects of our lives.
It is an ideal module for students thinking of doing a dissertation to critique an any area of representation and will introduce students to
key skills in researching topics in context and critically assessing diverse types of research both within, and beyond, journalism, media
andcommunication studies.
Please note that this module includes exploration of some personal, difficult and controversial issues.It can be emotionally as well as
intellectually challenging.

It is an ideal module for students thinking of doing a dissertation to critique an any area of representation and will introduce students to key skills in researching topics in context and critically assessing diverse types of research both within, and beyond, ‘communication studies’.

Assessment

  • Presentation: 20%
  • Written assessment: 80%
Module codeMC2622
LevelL5
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits20

This module focuses on film and cultural theory, introducing the one through the other and vice versa. Cultural theory will be introduced,
explored and tested by way of film, and films will be interpreted by way of cultural theory. Accordingly, students will develop a good
foundation in film and cultural theory, and develop knowledge of key debates in cultural theory, film theory, cultural studies and visual
cultural analysis. Weekly readings will be key texts in film and cultural theory. Lectures will provide introductions, overviews and
explanations. Screenings will primarily be of relatively contemporary English language films (plus some foreign language films), and
assessment will take the form of essay plan, presentation and final essay

Assessment

  • Presentation: 20%
  • Written assessment: 20%
  • Written assessment: 60%
Module codeMC2624
LevelL5
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits20

This module critically explores the industrial and institutional context of making television content today. For those with an interest in
television and aspirations to work in this industry, understanding some of the critical issues facing those who make television will be
invaluable as you transition into that workplace.
The module offers a historical understanding of the development of the television industry in the UK before exploring some of the
challenges facing producers and broadcasters with the rise of digital distribution. The module also considers the impact of this change on
the labour market for television and how issues such as diversity are being debated within the sector.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 50%
  • Presentation: 50%
Module codeMC2627
LevelL5
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits20

This module aims to explore the origin, meaning, production and consumption of celebrity culture. We will discuss the origins of the
“fame game”, look at the historical development of stardom and investigate key celebrity culture literature and theoretical models.
The module will mix both theoretical and practical approaches to the subject area to allow students to gain a unique insight into celebrity
creatin and management as well as being able to critique and debate the key theoretical models related to celebrity culture.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 70%
  • Written assessment: 30%
Module codeMC2630
LevelL5
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits20

The Internet has offered us many possibilities of communication, social networking, blogging, and accessing a vast range of information and online services. However it has also led to calls for stricter regulation of its content – from fake news to hate speech – and it is increasingly subject to censorship, surveillance, and various forms of access limitations. What, then, are the ways in which the internet is, can, and should be regulated? Where and how does internet governance take place, and by whom?  

In this module, we will explore and discuss current developments of online content restrictions, surveillance, net neutrality and cyber-security, and we will discuss the controversies around them. We will learn how online communication is shaped by states, commercial platforms, activists, and technical developers. We will address the historical development of internet freedoms and regulations. And we will learn about the international institutions where rules for the internet are set, such as the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN) and the Internet Governance Forum (IGF).

This module will be interesting for those who want to learn about current issues and processes of communication policy, and for those who want to understand how their everyday uses of the internet are shaped, enabled, and challenged. Internet governance is a new topic that is constantly changing and evolving. It does not require prior knowledge but just some curiosity about how our online environment is transforming.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 60%
  • Written assessment: 40%
Module codeMC2631
LevelL5
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits20

The module introduces students to the role of media and communications in processes of globalisation with a particular focus on questions of cultural change. It discusses the cultural implications of global media images and cultural products by exploring audience practices and media representations in different contexts. Topics include, for example, the global dominance of brands, celebrity, media events, and the media coverage of immigration. The first weeks of the module introduce the main theoretical approaches to mediated globalisation. The rest of the module discusses and assesses these approaches by critically exploring the connections between global media products and cultural transformation; changes and continuities in audience practices around the world; and the potential of media representations to transform social interaction across geographical borders.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 40%
  • Written assessment: 60%
Module codeMC2632
LevelL5
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits20

Approximately half of the public relations practitioners in the UK either work for government or have significant political focus within their employment.  This module provides students with key theoretical frameworks and contemporary academic critique of the relationships existing between public relations, democratic government and contemporary politics.  It explores the PR practices of governments, parties, firms, and interest groups, the responsibilities of practitioners, and the critical role of communications in the efficient working of government.  It investigates the persuasive efforts of marketing by political parties in modern party-democracies, especially in terms of media delivery.  The module teaches students about the effectiveness of political lobbying in Britain, as well as the ethical challenges of lobbying undertaken by firms and interest groups to influence government.  Students examine the populist resurgence of the last decade – on the left and right of the spectrum – and the opportunities and challenges it poses to professional political communications.   Students confront the recent turn to ‘disruptor’ political communication amongst political leaders and compare it to insurgency tactics of traditional ‘outsider’ groups in politics.  This module challenges students to engage is a scholarly criticism of how political public relations characterizes politics and politicians, and how it defends public challenges to that characterization, especially in times of democratic crisis.  It also challenges them to consider how practices of political communication influence the practice of democracy itself.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 25%
  • Written assessment: 75%
Module codeMC3213
LevelL6
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits20

The programme is divided into five sections. Each section will deal with a different media law topic. The five elements in chronological
order are:
1) Media Regulation: The first segment of the course looks at the so called ‘phone hacking’ scandal and the Leveson Inquiry into
the ethics of journalism. It will focus on where the blame must lie for the need for the judicial inquiry and also consider in some
detail the major landmarks on the road to Leveson. We will also look at the ‘fallout’ from the Inquiry Report and the print media’s
response in setting up a new ‘Independent’ regulator (IPSO: Independent Press Standards Organisation) that commenced work
on September 8th 2014.
2) Privacy and confidentiality: This is always a contentious area for the media and not just because of the phone hacking
scandal. The key question is: When and in what circumstances do people have a reasonable expectation of privacy? The
‘European’ position is somewhat different from that in England and Wales. We ask whether celebrities have a reasonable
expectation of privacy and if so in what circumstances. We consider the impact of ‘postings’ on social media sites such as
Facebook and ask whether those releasing images of themselves and others have legal rights to sue the media for breach of
privacy of those images are used without consent.
3) Protection of Sources: This is an important topic as journalists are often placed in positions where they have to guarantee
anonymity of a source before a story will be revealed. We examine the law, and examine how targeted and mass surveillance
may undermine the legal protection afforded to anonymous sources. We will also look at the legal position relating to requests
by the authorities for access to material held by the media. An important example was the request by Essex police in 2012 to
numerous media outlets to release all the footage taken at Dale Farm when the local council evicted a group of travellers from
their caravan site.
4) Family Court Reporting: The major criticisms relating to court proceedings have centred on the family courts. While open
justice is the mantra of the criminal courts the family courts have garnered very little print media space because of legal
restrictions imposed to protect family privacy and individual identity. All that has started to change with reforms introduced in
2014. We will look at the problems and proposed solutions designed to ensure a more positive working relationship between
the family courts and the media resulting in greater transparency for the public and much improved understanding as to how the
family court system operates.
5) Intellectual Property: In the main we will be focussing on the copyright laws and asking whether with the advent of the internet
they can ever be enforced, and whether there is copyright in news and images.
 

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 40%
  • Written assessment: 60%
Module codeMC3517
LevelL5
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits20

This is a module that functions as an introduction to the discipline of Television Studies. Focusing primarily on TV drama, the module
examines the key debates that have framed, and continue to frame, the study of television form (e.g. narrative, aesthetics, genre) and
content. Areas of focus include how to understand television from an academic perspective, analysing multiple areas of televisual content
and form via applying and critiquing key academic and industrial terms and approaches, the impact of institutional structures and contexts
upon multiple areas of industry practice, the historical development and/or academic periodisation of TV drama, and industrial strategies
for targeting and understanding television audiences. The module will thus introduce you to:
Debates around the structures and historical development of the television industry by focusing upon how this has changed over the past
sixty years and how these changes have affected such areas of television fiction as production, distribution, textuality, marketing and
consumption.
Why fictional television programmes take the form that they do by considering how such concepts as narrative, diegesis, character, genre
and aesthetics are employed by television specifically.
How the concept of the ‘audience’ has been understood, and continues to develop, in relation to television fictions

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 30%
  • Written assessment: 70%
Module codeMC3549
LevelL5
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits20

The first part of this course examines: the origins, organisation and techniques of propaganda used by one party states in the twentieth
century. It also aims to give students a sound grasp of the history, organisation and techniques of propaganda and the ability to analyse
and critically evaluate different forms of the practice of propaganda. The second part of the course is concerned with how wars have been
reported and discusses the reasons why so much war reporting has been little more than “war propaganda”.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 50%
  • Examination - spring semester: 40%
  • Oral/aural assessment: 10%
Module codeMC3566
LevelL6
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits20

This module explores the development of a wide-range of visual media such as photography, cinema, television and digital media.  Key technological, conceptual, theoretical and aesthetic issues will be discussed in order to gain a better insight on the actual workings of media itself.  The module will consider how visual media has shaped knowledge in different contexts and discourses, and also how shifting spaces have shaped audiences’ experiences of screen media. We will examine the roles of key pioneers of visual media technologies and debate topics such as: aesthetics, “art vs. science”, industry and “truth-telling”. In doing such, this module will survey both practical and theoretical aspects of media ranging from early histories to modern times, including a variety of subjects and styles.

Assessment

  • Oral/aural assessment: 10%
  • Written assessment: 40%
  • Written assessment: 50%
Module codeMC3585
LevelL6
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits20

This module considers the historically complex relationship between media and childhood in western societies.  It will examine a number of longstanding debates on media and children with the aim of understanding contemporary views and responses to children’s media use, representation and production as well as wider issues around media education, policy and children’s rights.

 

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 50%
  • Report: 40%
  • Presentation: 10%
Module codeMC3589
LevelL6
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits20

The aim of this module is to critically reflect on how effective different media systems are in communicating information and informing
citizens about what is happening in the world. It will examine contemporary news practices and conventions in television news, changing
news values and audience expectations, (de) and (re)regulatory shifts and emerging forms of journalism, market forces and public service
interventions, editorial pressures and occupational values and much more to understand how and why journalism is evolving in the 21st
century.
The module begins by exploring how journalism can be evaluated, unpacking what is meant by ‘quality’ news or news of ‘democratic
value’. It then provides an overview of how news is potentially influenced by competing ownership structures and media systems. In doing
so, the module will compare public and market-driven news organisations and assess how regulatory frameworks and journalism cultures
help shape the production of news.
Having explored how news is made and shaped from a variety of perspectives, the module draws on the latest scholarly research into
elections and the televised leaders’ debates, politics and journalism in a post-devolution United Kingdom, rolling news and the 24/7 news
cycle as well as debates about impartiality and partisan US cable channels and changing news formats. In addition, journalists will be put
under the spotlight, making sense of who they are and whether they are trusted and valued by audiences. All of which is designed not
only to enhance your understanding of contemporary journalism, but for you to carry out your own study and analysis of television news

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 40%
  • Written assessment: 60%
Module codeMC3595
LevelL5
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits20

This module aims to introduce, explore and analyse key issues related to how science, the environment, and health are covered in the
media.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 50%
  • Written assessment: 50%
Module codeMC3596
LevelL6
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits20

This module addresses critically the multifaceted and widespread influence of the public relations industry on the news media and
explores the wider effects of this influence on democracy, politics, and society. It will enable students to look under the bonnet of the
news media and the PR industry, understand what makes them function, and how they affect each other. At the end of the course it is
hoped students will be more critical and clear-sighted readers, which will in turn help them become more informed and active citizens.
More specifically, it will invite students to engage with:
 the history of propaganda and the rise of PR throughout the 20th and 21st centuries;
 a wide range of critical theories of news sources and public relations (including liberal pluralist and political economic/Marxian
perspectives, as well as studies which focus on the activities of both journalists and source groups);
 work which attends to the growing importance of spin, political strategic communication, and the work of corporate and
non-corporate lobbyists; and
 a number of illustrative case studies of both media content and distinct kinds of media management campaigns (including the
source battles around health issues, police PR, food industry media management, and the rise of celebrity PR and promotional
culture).
This is not a module that will train you in practical public relations skills. It is an academic module that overwhelmingly focuses on the
critical literature in the fields of journalism/media studies and media sociology. Past feedback has indicated, however, that the knowledge
and understanding students gain on the course is useful for future careers in the communications industries, and this module is a good
complement for the skills-based communications courses also offered by JOMEC

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 50%
  • Written assessment: 50%
Module codeMC3600
LevelL5
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits20

The programme is centred on 6 distinct topics taught in accordance with the details provided in the timetable which is listed in the
MODULE SCHEDULE SECTION on Learning Central. You will also be given a hardcopy in the first lecture. The academic teaching
programme is based around 6 ‘cycles’ with time being provided for lectures, seminars, assignment preparation and for one to one
feedback sessions.
The lectures which are of approximately 2 hours in duration will provide underpinning information to guide you through the major issues to
be considered in the seminars in each cycle. Those materials on Learning Central which are essential to read for the seminar are in red;
those which I would like you to read are in green; the remaining material will be useful for the assignments or to get a broader
understanding on the topic.
You will all receive worksheets outlining the topics for discussion and why the issues are legally important to the media today. These
worksheets will contain references to basic primary and secondary source material much of which will be placed on Learning Central for
easy access.
My role is to support your learning throughout the module but it must be stressed that you must take responsibility from the outset for
undertaking the research that will be necessary to both contribute to seminar discussions and to utilise the material for your assignments.
I will be delivering all the lectures and seminars

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 40%
  • Written assessment: 60%
Module codeMC3603
LevelL5
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits20

This module takes a closer look at the relationship between media and democracy, primarily with attention to the way it works in the UK and the US. It explores key approaches relevant to this relationship, and applies them to current trends, debates, and cases. It will examine ongoing changes in the media’s role in democracy through a range of case studies. Among other topics, the module will look at the blurring line between politics and popular culture and the corresponding rise of the “celebrity politician,” the increasingly personalised nature of political news, the role of scandals around sex, money and power in the democratic process, the emergence of fake news, the impact of personalisation algorithms, and how social media, including Twitter and Facebook, are shaping public participation.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 35%
  • Oral/aural assessment: 20%
  • Examination - autumn semester: 45%
Module codeMC3608
LevelL6
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits20

The creative industries are one of the fastest growing employment sectors in the UK. This module will provide students with knowledge of the key creative and cultural sectors and help them to understand the emerging synergies between them.  Students will be encouraged to take a critical approach to the term creative industries and the rhetorics of ‘creativity’, ‘innovation’ and ‘impact’ that often accompany its use.

The module gives students a timely introduction to the landscape and realities of creative (and media) work, including emerging models of creative practice and doing business.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 40%
  • Written assessment: 60%
Module codeMC3610
LevelL6
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits20

This module has two broad aims: firstly, it intends to introduce you to a range of theoretical debates regarding what constitutes ‘television’ – specifically ‘British television’ – in the digital age. Secondly, the module aims to increase your familiarity with the diverse workings of the industry, increasing your potential employability for a career in television by introducing you to industry structures and the myriad ways in which you can pursue a possible career relating to ‘television’. Whilst this module is NOT a practical course in television production, it is intended to build your knowledge of both the potential opportunities and limitations that the British television industry presents and get you thinking about areas such as policy, regulation, production, marketing, social media and beyond.

 

The module is split into three sections. The first focuses on current industrial concerns and how these have been informed by historical and political changes within the television industry. The second part looks at formal aspects of contemporary television programmes via tackling issues including digital aesthetics, multi-platforming, transmedia storytelling, commissioning and archiving. The final section looks at how audiences engage with television, and how these groups are industrially-targeted, through social media platforms and second-screening practices.

Whether you are serious about gaining access to the TV industry, or simply have a passing interest in British television within the digital era, then this module will be for you!

Assessment

  • Presentation: 20%
  • Written assessment: 80%
Module codeMC3612
LevelL6
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits20

This module is designed to give students a critical understanding of the major themes that surround sport, sport’s place in society and sport’s prominence in the mainstream media. It introduces students to the most pressing debates surrounding sport through a range of examples taken from academia, journalism, film and other media. This module will equip students with a developed awareness of the issues affecting sport and what this means for the media and society as a whole. From this awareness students are expected to engage with these pressing issues through their assignments which will help develop and test different research and communication skills. An example of some of the topics covered will be race and gender in sport, the role nationalism plays in the coverage of sport, and the impact money has had on the presentation and place of sport in society.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 50%
  • Written assessment: 50%
Module codeMC3619
LevelL6
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits20

The media industry is a multi-billion pound sector that is evolving as corporate mergers, new technologies and shifting audience demands
transform the landscape. As more business models emerge across the sector and the chain of production evolves, it has become more
important than ever for media graduates to care about, understand and influence the business element of their sector. This module offers
an in-depth introduction to the principles of business and applies these directly to the different sectors that comprise the media including:
television, film, journalism, publishing, radio, gaming and music..

Assessment

  • Presentation: 50%
  • Written assessment: 50%
Module codeMC3624
LevelL6
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits20

Reporting Conflict and the Civil Sphere examines the diverse roles that journalism plays in communicating conflicts, ideas about the public good and processes of change. The module aims to engage with a wide range of scholarly studies, both past and present, that help us to better understand the nature of mediated conflicts. As we do so, we attend to their informing theoretical frameworks and methodologies as well as substantive arguments and findings. Case studies of conflict reporting examined across the module include, for example, demonstrations and protests; warfare; media scandals and public crises; ‘race’, racism and ethnicity; the environment and ‘risk society’; identity politics; the Arab uprisings; and the rise in journalist killings worldwide. The module opens up a multi-faceted and theoretically informed understanding of production processes, professional practices, political contingencies and media performance and how these all shape the representation of major public issues and concerns. You will also be invited to engage in detailed analysis of current conflicts as they arise throughout the module and reflect on your own findings and research strategies. By the end of the module you will have developed a critical understanding of the forms and dynamics of conflict reporting, appreciate the role of theory and methodology in academic media analysis, and deepened your understanding of the role(s) performed by journalism in conflicts and conflicted societies.

           

Assessment

  • Report: 50%
  • Written assessment: 50%
Module codeMC3625
LevelL6
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits20

Pryd a sut mae defnyddio camera cudd? Ble mae’r ffin rhwng preifatrwydd unigolyn a phwysigrwydd stori newyddion i’r cyhoedd? Beth gall newyddiadurwyr ei wneud i amddiffyn eu ffynonellau?

Wrth astudio’r modiwl hwn bydd myfyrwyr yn adeiladu ar sgiliau newyddiadurol sylfaenol modiwlau ‘Yr Ystafell Newyddion’ gan edrych yn ddyfnach ar waith a swyddogaeth newyddiadurwyr. Y cyn gohebydd Sian Morgan Lloyd sydd yn arwain y modiwl, ac wrth ganolbwyntio ar newyddiaduraeth ymchwiliadol bydd y darlithoedd yn edrych ar yr heriau sydd yn wynebu newyddiadurwyr wrth fynd ati i geisio dod o hyd i’r gwir. Bydd y modiwl hefyd yn olrhain hanes swyddogaeth y newyddiadurwr ac yn edrych ar ba heriau sydd yn wynebu newyddiaduraeth ymchwiliadol yng Nghymru.

Mae’r modiwl yn addas i unrhyw fyfyriwr sy’n gobeithio dilyn gyrfa ym maes newyddiaduraeth yn ogystal ag unrhyw un sydd â diddordeb ehangach ym maes y cyfryngau, gwleidyddiaeth a chyfraith y cyfryngau. Bydd y modiwl yn cynnwys siaradwyr gwadd o’r diwydiant ac yn dysgu amrywiaeth o sgiliau newyddiadurol ymarferol trosglwyddadwy.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 25%
  • Presentation: 25%
  • Written assessment: 50%
Module codeMC3626
LevelL6
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits20

Nod y modiwl hwn fydd cymryd golwg feirniadol ac ymarferol ar ddylanwad cynyddol adrodd storïau ar waith mewn newyddiaduraeth, cyfathrebu a'r cyfryngau yn ogystal ag edrych ar y llwyfannau newydd a ddefnyddir i wneud hynny sy'n esblygu drwy'r amser - yma yng Nghymru ac ar draws y byd. Byddwn yn astudio sut mae technegau 'adrodd stori' newyddiadurol yn cael eu mabwysiadu fwyfwy yn y meysydd hysbysebu a chysylltiadau cyhoeddus gan frandiau masnachol yn ogystal â rhai cyhoeddus a diwylliannol. Gan edrych ar bwy sy'n dewis adrodd straeon a pham, byddwn hefyd yn adolygu gwahanol ddehongliadau o Gymru gyfoes a sut y mae stori'r wlad a'r genedl yn cael ei gyflwyno i'r byd yn ogystal â nôl adref. Bydd y modiwl yn archwilio ymgyrchoedd hynod effeithiol gan elusennau a mudiadau sy'n datblygu eu naratifau eu hunain i dargedu ac ymgysylltu â'r cyhoedd gyda chynnwys sy'n aml wedi ei greu mewn ystafelloedd newyddion mewnol.

 

Bydd y modiwl yn cymryd ymagwedd ddadansoddol ac ymarferol trwy gyflwyno'r datblygiadau diweddaraf mewn technegau adrodd stori ac offer ar gyfer cynulleidfaoedd penodol. Bydd myfyrwyr yn cael y cyfle i glywed yn uniongyrchol gan arbennigwyr fydd yn egluro pam a sut y maent yn datblygu naratifau a'r ffyrdd gorau o wneud hynny.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 20%
  • Presentation: 30%
  • Portfolio: 50%
Module codeMC3627
LevelL6
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits20

Data Power provides a critical introduction to ‘big data’. Increasingly, big data is being used in politics, governance, business, advertising, surveillance, journalism, arts and culture, law and justice, finance, city planning, health, education and science. The digitization of nearly everything, the exponential growth in the amount of data we produce and collect, along with major computing advances mean that it is now possible to combine and analyse staggering datasets in new ways. There is great promise and a lot of excitement about how big data might be used to make discoveries, improve services, security and quality of life. There are also concerns about privacy, the democratic and epistemological implications of changing practices, and how big data can be used to exploit, target, socially sort and discriminate.

 

The aim of this module is to provide an accessible critical introduction to big data for those with no prior knowledge of the subject. With each class we ask how our data is being collected, used, in whose interests, and to what ends. We consider big data practices in different contexts. For example, in one week we will consider the implications of data profiling and micro-targeting in political campaigning, and in another we will consider issues of transparency and accountability in uses of social media data analytics and the Internet of Things. In addition to lectures and readings we will make use of case studies, interactive tools, videos, and visualizations

Assessment

  • Presentation: 10%
  • Written assessment: 40%
  • Written assessment: 50%
Module codeMC3628
LevelL6
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits20

The module engages with the role of journalism and news media at a global level from a theoretical perspective. It discusses the significance of news media in not only providing information but also framing the way we understand the world. It provides a historical and political context for understanding the production of international news, the challenges posed for reporters of global news today, as well as the transformations journalism is currently undergoing. The module is organised in three sections. The first one addresses the political economy of global journalism and global news flows. The second discusses the news coverage of prominent contemporary global issues. The last section focuses on the challenges faced by journalism today in a changing technological, political and social context.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 40%
  • Written assessment: 60%
Module codeMC3629
LevelL6
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits20

Social Movements and Digital Media explores the ‘delicate dance’ between social movements and digital communication technologies. It focuses on the multiple ways through which activists use and adapt digital media to organize, mobilize, protest, forge collective identities, and pursue cultural change and social transformation.

In order to investigate the changing dynamics of protest in the digital age, the module critically engages with a wide range of key concepts and approaches such as social movement theory, political economy of communication, power/counter-power, practice theory, media ecologies, connective action, hybrid media systems, technopolitics, mediation, and citizen media. Throughout the module, we will examine the controversial relation between social media platforms and protest movements, analyse the reconfiguration of activism within hybrid media systems, scrutinize the cultures, the logics, the imaginaries, the identities, and the new forms of leadership and organizing of social movements in the digital age. Particular attention will be devoted to the study of the ‘dark side’ of digital resistance, including both repression, surveillance and new forms of authoritarianism supported by digital technology, but also the many internal conflicts that plague everyday forms of digital activism. The module will also discuss the implications that the increasing adoption of algorithms and big data in the realm of politics is having on social movements. Empirically, you will be invited to engage in the detailed exploration of the dynamics of several case studies and experiences including: Indymedia, the Zapatista uprising, Occupy, Anti-Austerity Protests, the Arab Spring, the #YoSoy132 movement, Anonymous, and the 5 Star Movement. By the end of the module, you will have developed a comprehensive appreciation of the key theories and debates for the study of digital activism, a critical understanding of the multiple ways through which digital media are reshaping the dynamics of contemporary social movements, and a nuanced evaluation of the current and future scenarios of digital resistance.

Assessment

  • Oral/aural assessment: 10%
  • Presentation: 40%
  • Written assessment: 50%
Module codeMC3630
LevelL6
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits20

This module teaches key theoretical frameworks and contemporary academic critique of the social and communicative relationships between financial markets, listed companies, media, governments, and publics.  It provides a qualitative introduction (i.e. no mathematics required) to global finance and its relationship to wider society.  Students learn about the critical role of communications in the efficient working of financial markets and the responsibility of ethical financial communications practice.  Students explore the role of financial media in markets, and how finance is represented in both specialized business media and in media as more widely consumed.  They explore rhetorical mechanisms of representation of money and its accumulation in the press, in legislatures, on television, and in film. They learn about the public relations efforts of the financial industry, government lobbying by financial firms, and how finance defends public challenges to its power, especially in times of crisis. This module surveys how finance has developed from a facilitator to a driver of the economic, and how this development has relied on government support. This module challenges students to engage in a scholarly criticism of how finance shapes and reshapes people’s lives, how it is characterized in media, and how it influences relationships between states, firms, and citizens.     

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 25%
  • Written assessment: 75%