Geography and Planning

Learn more about the modules study abroad students can take at the School of Geography and Planning.

Module codeCP0120
LevelL4
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits20

This module introduces students to key aspects of inequality in contemporary British society and considers contrasting theoretical perspectives to explain these.  Sociological theories are used to make sense of contemporary social change.  The lecture programme reflects current policy and academic debates which allows for a consideration of, amongst other topics, social exclusion, social mobility, riots and civic unrest, racial and gendered discrimination, social capital, consumption, identity and cultural capital, the spatialisation of social class and Public Health and well-being.  It provides a context for planners and geographers to understand the spatial consequences of social change and an introduction to a range of sociological theoretical perspectives which seek to explain these.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 60%
  • Written assessment: 40%
Module codeCP0121
LevelL4
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits20

The module introduces students to basic planning and plan making concepts through a mix of theory and practice orientated teaching. There is a specific focus on concepts, best practice, and current approaches related to land use planning, settlement structure and organisation, and the built environment.
 

Students have to explore elements of the urban fabric, urban form, accessibility, land use, physical development and design in existing places as a precursor to producing a conceptual design of a new development, e.g. urban extension, major infill or a new neighbourhood. Students will be introduced to observation techniques and methods for analysing and assessing urban settings including a building site in terms of aesthetic and functional qualities (permeability, legibility, flood risk, protected habitats, conservation etc.). They also will be introduced to digital mapping resources and graphic software applications. Problem solving approaches, team working, elementary drawing and various presentation skills are learnt in a series of workshops and activities.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 40%
  • Oral/aural assessment: 50%
  • Practical-based assessment: 10%
Module codeCP0136
LevelL4
SemesterDouble Semester
Credits20

This module introduces students to some of the fundamental research methods used in planning and human geography. All academics and policy makers use research methods as the practical tools used to answer questions about society and the places where people live and work In a nutshell, methods connect theory with practice and generate the data we need to understand the world around us. In this module we being by looking at some specialist methods used by geographers and planners – GIS and descriptive statistics that allows us to map data and understand in a very general sense how different social, economic and cultural phenomena vary across space and at different geographical scales; and interviews, images and media that allow us to present a much richer, deeper understanding  of how people construct and interact in space and place    

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 15%
  • Written assessment: 35%
  • Report: 15%
  • Report: 35%
Module codeCP0138
LevelL4
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits20

The transition to undergraduate study can be extremely challenging as students are expected to acquire a considerable new skill set, whilst also studying demanding material. The Study Skills module aims to support students through this transition by introducing them to new skills (such as identifying and referencing literature and different writing styles) and major pitfalls (such as plagiarism) in a supportive environment. Study Skills is not delivered in abstract from the rest of the degree; assignments and discussions will relate directly to the modules studied during the first year. Moreover, Study Skills will provide a setting within which the common threads between different modules can be brought together.

Assessment

  • Presentation: 20%
  • Written assessment: 45%
  • Report: 35%
Module codeCP0140
LevelL4
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits20

What is geography? What do geographers do? These are questions that you are bound to be asked at some point over the next few years, whether by a relative or a prospective employer. But what would your answer be? This module will help you answer these questions.

 

This module starts with the assumption that there are some particular ways that geographers ask questions about, and contribute to understandings of, the world. There are also key ideas that geographers often use. These create a way of looking at the world which we might call the geographical imagination. In this module we will explore this geographical imagination. Understandings developed here will underpin your work later in your degree, and by the end of the module you will be able to provide your own answers to the questions: What is geography? What do geographers do?  

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 50%
  • Written assessment: 50%
Module codeCP0141
LevelL4
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits20

For the first time in history more than half the world’s population now live in urban areas - understanding cities has never been more important. This module serves both to introduce students to the sub-discipline of urban geography, and to examine how cities function and operate, using key tools and concepts of the field. The module typically covers a range of themes and issues, including: theorisations of urban space and place; social relations and spatial structures; understanding cities, nature and environment; issues of urban economy, power and socio-spatial inequalities and polarisation; and the different dynamics of cities in the global North and South. Overall, the module has strong theoretical, conceptual and empirical components that seek to develop students’ understanding of the fundamental social and spatial dynamics of contemporary cities.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 50%
  • Examination - spring semester: 50%
Module codeCP0142
LevelL4
SemesterDouble Semester
Credits20

Human Geography is a dynamic discipline, changing its orientation and preoccupations in response to internal debates and external pressures. As a consequence, the ‘big questions’ geography asks, and seeks to answer, are always changing. This module identifies the key debates and issues that the discipline is exploring in the contemporary era. It does so by focusing on key sub-disciplinary areas that form the basis for modules in the second and third year of the degree (e.g. economic geography, social geography, cultural geography, political geography), and illustrating the key internal debates and external pressures that are driving the development of the discipline.  

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 50%
  • Written assessment: 50%
Module codeCP0143
LevelL4
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits20

This module examines the origins of spatial planning in Britain and explains how the current system has evolved. Particular attention is given to key themes in the emergence of British planning: its emergence as a local government activity; the impact of professionalisation and ‘visionary’ thinkers; changing political ideologies, and the shifting spatial scales of planning. Building on this historical foundation in the second half of the module, students will be introduced to the current structure of planning - its institutional, legal and political basis - with links being made to emerging debates about spatial planning at national, local and European scales. Students will be given a chance to observe planning decision-making processes in a planning committee meeting and examine the development of a new town.

Assessment

  • Examination - autumn semester: 85%
  • Class test: 15%
Module codeCP0144
LevelL4
SemesterDouble Semester
Credits20

This module is concerned with the nature of urban economies. Taught at an introductory level, it examines why and how urban economies take particular forms across the world. The module is divided into two main parts, covering the crucial aspects of economic geography and planning for cities. The first half of the module examines the influence of various global, national and regional factors that impact upon urban economies, such as the rise of globalisation, social inequalities and environmental issues. The second half re-approaches economic aspects of urban life from an alternative point of view, offering an introduction to alternative economies, global south urbanism, informality and illegality. An overall important aspect of the module is to examine impact of planning and policy on urban economies. These areas are generally concerned with fostering economic prosperity and societal equalities, often by modifying people’s behaviour to alleviate undesirable effects of wealth-generating activities. Understanding the nature of these urban economies is therefore of crucial importance for all planning and policy making activity, both in cities of the Global North and South. The module uses lectures to introduce key analytical ideas, concepts and readings, and seminars to enable students to understand and explore these ideas in more detail.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 50%
  • Examination - spring semester: 50%
Module codeCP0145
LevelL4
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits20

 

This module provides students of planning with an insight into the property development industry. The primary objective of the module is to provide students with the knowledge and awareness of the property development processindustry to enable them to make realistic and effective interventions in the production of the built environment. Understanding the constraints and opportunities od development can inform and shape decision-making.

 

The overall objective of the module is to ensure planning students can demonstrate an understanding of the workings of the property development sector and therefore deliver sensible interventions to achieve planning objectives.

 

The module aims to:

 

  • Provide students of planning with an understanding of the operation of the property development sector;
  • Provide students with an understanding of key sectors of principal relevance to land-use planning.

Assessment

  • Report: 50%
  • Examination - autumn semester: 50%
Module codeCP0146
LevelL4
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits20

This module introduces students to rural geography and contemporary issues facing the countryside. The module provides a history of the nature of rural geography and its struggle to define who and what counts as rural. The module considers contemporary rural restructuring, covering regimes of agricultural production; the production and consumption of rural landscapes; contestation over the use of the countryside; population change in rural environments; and marginal rural livelihoods In developing countries, the module considers debates over agricultural development and approaches to rural development.

 

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 50%
  • Examination - spring semester: 50%
Module codeCP0147
LevelL4
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits20

This module introduces students to the complex relationship between humans and the natural environment. Students will develop an understanding of key areas of contemporary environmental change, such as climate & the atmosphere (e.g. air pollution and the consequences for public health), animals (e.g. the impacts of animal diseases on people and communities), vegetation (e.g. deforestation, desertification and famine), waters (e.g. urbanisation, heightened river flow and flooding), and geomorphology (e.g. human impacts on and the human cost of seismic activity). The focus of the module is on understanding how humans have influenced these changes, how they have been affected by them, and how they have attempted to deal with them (e.g. through protest or protection). In doing so, the module explores the uneven geographical distribution of impacts on both environment and society, the different scales at which environmental change is experienced (e.g. local and global), and different ways of perceiving environmental change (e.g. the relationship between ‘local’ and scientific knowledge).

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 50%
  • Examination - spring semester: 50%
Module codeCP0211
LevelL5
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits20

This module is about the spatial dimensions of economic activity - i.e. why and where businesses create jobs and wealth, where people work and earn money, how and where firms create jobs and wealth, and the role of the state in shaping the geographies of economies. The module primarily focuses on analysing manufacturing and service sectors, using contemporary economic geography perspectives. It also considers the role of different actors (such as large transnational firms and governments) in shaping the geography of economic activity. The module uses lectures to introduce key analytical ideas, concepts and readings, and uses workshops and discussions to enable students to understand and explore these ideas in more detail.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 50%
  • Written assessment: 50%
Module codeCP0221
LevelL5
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits20

This module will argue that cultural ideas, groups, and practices are fundamental to the ways the spaces and places around us are created and changed. Culture helps form our identity, our neighbourhoods, our cities, and our nations. Culture is therefore inherently social, but also geographical. Culture builds us, and our worlds.

 

This module critically engages with how geographers have looked at the idea and practice of ‘culture’, and how the geographies of which we are a part are defined by how different cultural groups take and make the places in which we live.

 

As part of this critical engagement, the module considers how our attachments to place and our exercise of power are crucial components to our cultural identity. The module explores cultures of youth, capitalism, ethnicity, nature, language, and the body through interactive lectures and discussion in seminars. It will appeal to students interested in understanding how culture, identity, and geography are strongly intertwined in our daily lives.

 

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 50%
  • Written assessment: 50%
Module codeCP0250
LevelL5
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits20

This is a project-based course. This will involve the application of planning and design principles to the development of a mixed-use design scheme for a large site. Through this, students will learn about urban design, site planning issues and how planners deal with the design of development in their work. They will also get an insight into the design process and learn basic graphic, design and presentations skills in order to produce their final design scheme.

 

Students will then be taught the principles of valuation in order to judge the commercial viability of development schemes, and in order to understand the relationship between the form a development takes and its value to consumers and developers. Students will have to complete two forms of valuation, and learn the value of the different approaches.

Assessment

  • Presentation: 15%
  • Written assessment: 35%
  • Written assessment: 50%
Module codeCP0252
LevelL5
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits20

Planners play an important role in regulating and managing development. This module explores the legal, regulatory and policy tools available to planners for managing development. In addition, it explores the various objectives that guide the use of these tools, as expressed through plans and policies at different scales. The module is a particularly valuable one for anyone intending to work in planning practice.

 

 

The module is designed to:

 

  1. Provide students with an understanding of the law and the legal principles governing planning practice and the regulation of development in England and Wales;
  2. Introduce students to the key planning policy instruments used by governments at central, regional and local levels of the planning system;
  3. Familiarise students with the range of instruments and controls available to planners to regulate development.

 

The module is delivered in the Spring semester. The module comprises a series of lectures that address matters of planning law and planning policy, complemented by some interactive, workshop-style sessions. The material in the module is focused on understanding the planning policy framework and the practical operation of the development management system. At the end of the module students will have a good understanding of the British statutory planning system covering both planning policy and development management.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 50%
  • Written assessment: 50%
Module codeCP0253
LevelL5
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits20

This module provides a critical overview of the development of human geographical thought. It explores how the contemporary cutting edge of the discipline builds on the historical development of theory but also challenges it, offering new and exciting empirical spaces to study, alongside vibrant theoretical approaches with which to understand them. The module demonstrates how the careful construction of theoretical approaches might help students develop their own arguments within the geographical discipline and in related areas such as planning.

 

The main aims of the module are as follows:

  • To familiarise students with the intellectual terrain of Human Geography
  • To show how historical geographical ideas have shaped the development of the discipline in the present day
  • To show how current geographical ‘paradigms’ challenge those of the past and offer new perspectives on the world
  • To introduce key texts and commentaries
  • To develop critical evaluations of geographical thought
  • To show how geographical ideas can be applied to the analysis of particular subject areas

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 50%
  • Written assessment: 50%
Module codeCP0254
LevelL5
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits10

Qualitative methods are fundamental to much research in contemporary Human Geography and Planning. Many of you will choose to use qualitative methods in your dissertations or final year projects, and many of you will find qualitative research skills useful in your future careers.

 

Building on the qualitative research methods covered in the Year One module Introducing Research Methods (CP0136), this module broadens the range of qualitative research methods you are able to critically assess and use in your research projects. The module begins by emphasising the key methodological choices that need to be made when designing a research project, and moves on to introduce you to an array of advanced qualitative methods, including ethnography, phonography, mobile methods, and film. 

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 60%
  • Written assessment: 40%
Module codeCP0255
LevelL5
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits10

This module builds and strengthens the insights and skills on research methodology gained from the CP0136 Introducing Research Methods in Year One.

 

This module develops these skills by broadening the range of quantitative research methods students are able to critically assess and use in their research projects and dissertation.

 

Quantitative methods, and statistical methods in particular, are highly sought after by a whole range of employers, policy makers and stakeholders and the module represents key training in these geography and planning methods and develops important transferable skills in the job market.

 

The module begins by highlighting quantitative research in geography, planning and policy, introduces questionnaires and surveys as a form of data collection and then discusses sampling strategies, population distributions and hypothesis testing before covering a range of statistical techniques within the context of undertaking a group project.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 50%
  • Examination - spring semester: 50%
Module codeCP0258
LevelL5
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits20

 

This module examines changing relationships between humans and the environment through the lens of ‘sustainability’. The module equips students with an understanding of the roots and principles of sustainable development and examines the emergence of sustainability as a central focus of global environmental policy debates. Key questions in delivering environmental sustainability are investigated: Whose knowledge counts in determining threats and solutions to environmental sustainability? What institutional structures might most effectively lead to environmental sustainability? How might environmental sustainability be credibly assessed and measured? The module also explores a series of in-depth sustainability case studies, typically including climate change, biodiversity, food security, consumption and waste. Throughout the module, the significance of geographical differences is emphasised, whether in highlighting differences between the global north and south, or difficulties in translating global agendas to the national and local scale.

Assessment

  • Examination - autumn semester: 50%
  • Written assessment: 50%
Module codeCP0259
LevelL5
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits20

A key role for planning, but also a persistent challenge, is to allow communities the scope to engage in development decisions that affect them. It might be seen as on the front line of democracy. To respond to such challenges, this module focuses on community engagement (and more specifically on the practices of participation mediation and negotiation). It has two main aims: to clarify and elicit critical reflection on examples of participation, mediation and negotiation in planning; and to present real-world experiences of how these processes emerge, are designed and run and what sort of outcomes they produce.

The module is structured around a mix of lectures- and seminars- based learning.

Overall, the module investigates the complex relationships between space and place, state and citizens, communities and institutions in a practice-based approach rooted in theor(ies) in planning and theor(ies) for planning.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 60%
  • Presentation: 40%
Module codeCP0310
LevelL6
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits20

This module invites students to reflect on their knowledge of their ‘home’ planning system from an international and comparative perspective. It explains the international forces driving changes to planning cultures, such as economic and environmental globalisation, Europeanisation and cross-national policy learning, and considers how far the present and future forms of planning in different national settings reflects political, social and administrative cultures. Key components of planning law and practice (e.g. definitions of development, scope for discretion, role and status of plans, opportunities for participation, national-to-local relations) are analysed through a series of national case studies taken from Europe, North America and Asia. Students will apply their knowledge in a group-work exercise in teams of students act as consultants to design a new planning system for the European island of Pontevedro. The module is also helpful in prompting students to think about the scope for studying or working abroad.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 50%
  • Presentation: 50%
Module codeCP0312
LevelL6
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits20

The module stands back from the details of planning policies and instruments, and asks questions about how we might understand some of the key ideas used, and assumed, by those engaged in the planning system. These include ideas such as ‘the public interest’, and ‘heritage and conservation’. An organising framework for the module is different ways of understanding what being a professional involves.  Particular attention will be given to the idea of the planner as technician, and the contrasting idea of the reflective practitioner. The understanding developed in the module is used to illuminate aspects of everyday planning whose significance might go unnoticed in discussions with a more procedural focus. 

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 40%
  • Written assessment: 60%
Module codeCP0338
LevelL6
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits20

An initial review of UK transport policy and practice since the 1960s leads into more detailed examination of travel behaviour and its relevance to the design, analysis and evaluation of transport policies. Issues covered include: satisfying mobility versus improving accessibility; the crucial relationship between land use planning and transport; environmental degradation and the need to develop a sustainable transport policy; financial, administrative, and organisational aspects of transport; and the demographic, economic, social and technological factors which influence the demand for travel. Students will also be introduced to theories and models of behaviour which form the basis for understanding and predicting the response of a travel market to transport policies. The course will be illustrated with case studies. Students will engage in a site-specific project which examines accessibility and the potential for sustainable transport. The module will be assessed through a site-specific sustainable transport poster (30%) followed by an individual report (70%).  

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 70%
  • Written assessment: 30%
Module codeCP0340
LevelL6
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits20

From their very beginnings cities have been sites of social tension, exploitation and emancipatory movements. This remains the same today, with a host of contemporary processes giving rise to new questions of justice and, at the same time, resurrecting some age-old issues. Indeed, cities today face unprecedented challenges. Migration, rapid urbanization, growing inequality, authoritarian governments, racial tensions, terrorism, climate change, and the list goes on. These issues are also transformed by processes of globalization, whereby the connections and networks between cities separated by vast physical distances have intensified, leading to complex urban relationships that have required new theoretical understandings.

 

The module investigates cities and social justice from a geographical perspective.  The concept of justice is itself sprawling, its complicated lineaments a persistent source of intense philosophical debate. At its core, justice refers to the standards used in assessing what is fair; measuring social justice is assessing what is fair, good or moral across society, especially the distribution of benefits and burdens between different population groupings. Definitions of a just society are necessarily wide-ranging, incorporating a variety of cross-cutting tensions between individual versus societal norms, and between universalism and group difference. These musings on social justice are not simply an academic exercise; they are also reflected in the real world, from segregation and polarization to homelessness, environmental racism and violence. 

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 50%
  • Examination - autumn semester: 50%
Module codeCP0341
LevelL6
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits20

This module provides a critical perspective on some of the key social, economic, political, and environmental issues faced in the developing world. Drawing upon examples from across Africa, Latin America, and Asia, students will examine contemporary issues such as; child labour, conflict, conservation, food security, gender inequality, natural disasters and slums. Students will be encouraged to think critically about both the construction of these problems and the solutions which are advocated. Throughout the module students will be required to research and critique issues of development, resulting in an ability to engage in and inform contemporary development debates.

Assessment

  • Oral/aural assessment: 25%
  • Written assessment: 75%
Module codeCP0356
LevelL6
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits20

The aim of the module is to explore the nature of housing inequalities in the UK, the impacts of such inequalities on people and places and to critically analyse the role of public policy in creating and addressing housing inequalities.

 

Throughout the module the focus is the UK housing system through the lens of people, places and policies. It will explore how individuals and households experience housing inequalities; the socio-spatial patterning of housing availability and how such inequalities and patterns shape the ways in which places and communities are built or destroyed. Threaded throughout these themes will be a critical analysis of the way in which housing, planning and other public policies attempt to address or even create housing inequality

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 50%
  • Written assessment: 50%
Module codeCP0361
LevelL6
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits20

This module examines important contemporary concepts, debates and issues in economic geography. It builds on concepts introduced in the second year module on ‘Spaces of Production’ and provides a strong foundation for understanding the relevance of economic geography research. The module critically examines the rise of recent approaches, such as evolutionary economic geography and global production networks.  While important issues that are examined include the role of innovation, networks and institutions in contemporary economies.  The module connects students to the economic geography research in the School of Geography and Planning and draws upon a range of examples and case studies to understand contemporary issues in the global economy. 

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 100%
Module codeCP0363
LevelL6
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits20

This module will introduce students to the dynamic field of Feminist Geography.  Students will gain an understanding of what have been the key issues in this field over time as well as engaging with cutting-edge contemporary research.  Students will work with concepts such as power, care, identity, the sexual division of labour, embodiment and materiality.  As such this module dovetails nicely with other modules in the School, offering students the opportunity to expand on concepts to which they have been introduced elsewhere and synthesise their learning in new ways. 

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 35%
  • Written assessment: 15%
  • Written assessment: 50%
Module codeCP0364
LevelL6
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits10

This module serves as a ‘capstone’ for the BSc Geography and Planning programme, fusing the geography and planning perspectives encountered across other modules making up the degree. Specifically, it aims to integrate the substantive and theoretical insights of human geography with the applied, problem-solving approaches prevalent within planning. Through lectures, seminar discussions and assessed work, students are encouraged to explore the implications of an integrated geography and planning approach in relation to a variety of topical themes, including: resilience; community conflict and NIMBY; and spatial social justice. Overall, the module engages a timely debate over how dialogue between human geography and planning has a role to play in shaping critical professional sensibilities within planning. 

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 100%
Module codeCP0366
LevelL6
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits20

This module examines the relationship between humans and the environment in the context of natural and man-made climate change. This relationship will be explored using a variety of examples from the developed and developing world to explore how society has responded to the physical processes and impacts of climate. During the module, we will: explore the physical processes related to natural and man-made climate change and scientific interpretation of these processes; assess the impacts of both natural and man-made climate change; examine societal and policy responses to climate change at different geographical scales and in different developmental contexts; and critically examine how the relationship between the physical environment and societal responses have evolved (and are evolving).

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 50%
  • Written assessment: 50%
Module codeCP0367
LevelL6
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits20

This module provides a contemporary interpretation of the emerging trends in retailing and consumption. It addresses the relationship between consumption and the development of the (modern and post-modern) city. The first part of the module investigates the genealogy of the literature that focuses on consumption and modern urban life. The main aim is to critically trace how the development of the modern city can be characterised by the relationship between consumption identities, lifestyles, forms of sociability and urban spaces and places. In the second part of the module we will address the consumption of food and examine the changing practices of eating, shopping for food, and production and disposal of waste. Focusing mainly on western cultures, we will look into the environmental implications of these practices and the role of class, gender, ethnicity, sexuality and sub-cultural styles. In the last part of the module we will address the development of retailing and store location, and the ways in which it shapes high street and shopping mall layouts, branding and product qualities, as well as the decline of the mall and the rise of internet shopping. Lastly we will conclude with some consideration with the de-materialization of many consumption practices looking at the case of music.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 50%
  • Written assessment: 50%
Module codeCP0370
LevelL6
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits20

This module explores the design dimension of current planning and development practice, and associated issues of investment and development objectives and processes in the UK. It explores the tensions between central and local government over design matters and the variety of ways that statutory and non-statutory documents can set a framework for local intervention. It examines the built environment preoccupations of the development industry, the design professions, local politicians and the general public and how these perspectives influence the form and quality of villages, towns and cities in the UK. It provides students with an opportunity to develop the design appraisal, evaluation, and improvement skills they have been introduced to in the earlier years of the programme. 

Students will be given the opportunity to improve their graphic skills and document production. This module will be a very useful prelude to a Masters in Urban Design and will assist in the preparation of the design portfolio necessary for admission to such a degree course level.

Assessment

  • Presentation: 30%
  • Written assessment: 70%