Biosciences

Learn more about the modules study abroad students can take at the School of Biosciences.

Module codeBI1001
LevelL4
SemesterDouble Semester
Credits20

This module will assist you in getting the most out of your undergraduate studies.  The focus will be on the skills and competencies that are required to undertake academic study in a scientific context. The skills covered within this module will support your studies and improve your competencies in scientific practical skills. The module will prepare you for learning at years 2, 3 and beyond. The module will also enhance your employability skills whether you follow a scientific or non-scientific career. It will also give an introduction to the historical and theoretical background of contemporary science, and its communication. The areas covered will include presentation skills, scientific writing, data analysis and application of statistical concepts, the use of computer technology and a variety of software packages such as R and Endnote. The module will also cover basic scientific practical skills and an introduction to the concept of scientific method.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 25%
  • Written assessment: 10%
  • Written assessment: 15%
  • Written assessment: 10%
  • Practical-based assessment: 10%
  • Practical-based assessment: 10%
  • Examination - autumn semester: 10%
  • Examination - spring semester: 10%
Module codeBI1001
LevelL4
SemesterDouble Semester
Credits20

This module will assist you in getting the most out of your undergraduate studies.  The focus will be on the skills and competencies that are required to undertake academic study in a scientific context. The skills covered within this module will support your studies and improve your competencies in scientific practical skills. The module will prepare you for learning at years 2, 3 and beyond. The module will also enhance your employability skills whether you follow a scientific or non-scientific career. It will also give an introduction to the historical and theoretical background of contemporary science, and its communication. The areas covered will include presentation skills, scientific writing, data analysis and application of statistical concepts, the use of computer technology and a variety of software packages such as R and Endnote. The module will also cover basic scientific practical skills and an introduction to the concept of scientific method.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 25%
  • Written assessment: 10%
  • Written assessment: 15%
  • Written assessment: 10%
  • Practical-based assessment: 10%
  • Practical-based assessment: 10%
  • Examination - autumn semester: 10%
  • Examination - spring semester: 10%
Module codeBI1002
LevelL4
SemesterDouble Semester
Credits20

This module will provide an overview of the structure and function of living organisms at a systems level.  You will explore the disciplines of anatomy, physiology and neuroscience through themes including: movement, respiration, nutrition, transport, reproduction and communication.  A comparative approach will be taken to highlight similarities and differences in systems across species.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 20%
  • Written assessment: 10%
  • Examination - autumn semester: 20%
  • Examination - spring semester: 50%
Module codeBI1002
LevelL4
SemesterDouble Semester
Credits20

This module will provide an overview of the structure and function of living organisms at a systems level.  You will explore the disciplines of anatomy, physiology and neuroscience through themes including: movement, respiration, nutrition, transport, reproduction and communication.  A comparative approach will be taken to highlight similarities and differences in systems across species.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 20%
  • Written assessment: 10%
  • Examination - autumn semester: 20%
  • Examination - spring semester: 50%
Module codeBI1003
LevelL4
SemesterDouble Semester
Credits20

An understanding of the natural world and the animals, plants and micro-organisms that comprises it is essential to human health and welfare. You will explore the great natural diversity that exists in the living world and examine the adaptations required to survive in a range of environments. You will learn to integrate the response of individuals to the environment with the ways in which organisms interact within populations and communities. By studying organisms and how they interact you will discover the relevance of these interactions on humans, the impact of humans on sustainability and the application of knowledge arising from these studies.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 20%
  • Written assessment: 10%
  • Examination - autumn semester: 20%
  • Examination - spring semester: 50%
Module codeBI1003
LevelL4
SemesterDouble Semester
Credits20

An understanding of the natural world and the animals, plants and micro-organisms that comprises it is essential to human health and welfare. You will explore the great natural diversity that exists in the living world and examine the adaptations required to survive in a range of environments. You will learn to integrate the response of individuals to the environment with the ways in which organisms interact within populations and communities. By studying organisms and how they interact you will discover the relevance of these interactions on humans, the impact of humans on sustainability and the application of knowledge arising from these studies.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 20%
  • Written assessment: 10%
  • Examination - autumn semester: 20%
  • Examination - spring semester: 50%
Module codeBI1004
LevelL4
SemesterDouble Semester
Credits20

This module will provide a comparative overview of the structures and activities of prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. The module aims to describe the relationship between structure and function, and how the characteristics of cells facilitate their metabolic activities and allow them to contribute to the activity of tissues. The module will cover the following themes: Comparative cellular structure; cellular energetics; cellular reproduction; cells in the context of tissues; cellular homeostasis and cell-to-cell interactions. The module will take a comparative approach, addressing these areas in prokaryotes, animals, plants and fungi.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 20%
  • Written assessment: 10%
  • Examination - autumn semester: 20%
  • Examination - spring semester: 50%
Module codeBI1004
LevelL4
SemesterDouble Semester
Credits20

This module will provide a comparative overview of the structures and activities of prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. The module aims to describe the relationship between structure and function, and how the characteristics of cells facilitate their metabolic activities and allow them to contribute to the activity of tissues. The module will cover the following themes: Comparative cellular structure; cellular energetics; cellular reproduction; cells in the context of tissues; cellular homeostasis and cell-to-cell interactions. The module will take a comparative approach, addressing these areas in prokaryotes, animals, plants and fungi.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 20%
  • Written assessment: 10%
  • Examination - autumn semester: 20%
  • Examination - spring semester: 50%
Module codeBI1014
LevelL4
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits20

This module will give bioscience students a broad knowledge and understanding of physical, inorganic and organic chemistry to take them up to and past A-level chemistry and to provide them with the chemical background needed for their courses at Levels 1, 2 and 3. It also describes the key structural, informational and catalytic macromolecules found in living organisms, including proteins, nucleic acids (DNA and RNA), lipids and carbohydrates, and explains their functional significance.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 20%
  • Written assessment: 10%
  • Class test: 20%
  • Examination - autumn semester: 50%
Module codeBI1014
LevelL4
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits20

This module will give bioscience students a broad knowledge and understanding of physical, inorganic and organic chemistry to take them up to and past A-level chemistry and to provide them with the chemical background needed for their courses at Levels 1, 2 and 3. It also describes the key structural, informational and catalytic macromolecules found in living organisms, including proteins, nucleic acids (DNA and RNA), lipids and carbohydrates, and explains their functional significance.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 20%
  • Written assessment: 10%
  • Class test: 20%
  • Examination - autumn semester: 50%
Module codeBI1051
LevelL4
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits20

Molecular and population genetics are integrated with information on evolutionary patterns and processes to explain genotypic and phenotypic changes in cells, organisms, populations, species and higher taxa. The module explores the origins of Life on Earth, the origin and evolution of the eukaryotic cell, genetic principles governing inheritance and gene-gene interactions, gene expression, techniques of genomic and population genetic analysis, embryo development, the deterministic and stochastic factors that affect the genetic make-up of populations, the evolution of the major animal and plant groups, and the history of evolutionary thought.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 20%
  • Written assessment: 10%
  • Class test: 20%
  • Examination - spring semester: 50%
Module codeBI1051
LevelL4
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits20

Molecular and population genetics are integrated with information on evolutionary patterns and processes to explain genotypic and phenotypic changes in cells, organisms, populations, species and higher taxa. The module explores the origins of Life on Earth, the origin and evolution of the eukaryotic cell, genetic principles governing inheritance and gene-gene interactions, gene expression, techniques of genomic and population genetic analysis, embryo development, the deterministic and stochastic factors that affect the genetic make-up of populations, the evolution of the major animal and plant groups, and the history of evolutionary thought.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 20%
  • Written assessment: 10%
  • Class test: 20%
  • Examination - spring semester: 50%
Module codeBI2001
LevelL5
SemesterDouble Semester
Credits20

The module aims to provide students with the fundamental experimental, intellectual and generic skills that are essential for design and conduct of research projects, and the evaluation and communication of the resulting data in the existing scientific context. The majority of the 2 semester module will be taught in practical classes and tutorials using experimental tasks which are fundamental for biological, biomedical and/or biomolecular research as appropriate to the degree scheme being followed. The experimental classes will be complemented by tutorials, clinics and lectures on specific and more generic issues such as experimental design, information retrieval and management. The module will be assessed solely on coursework. There are multiple versions of this module: Occurrence A (Biological/Zoological) - The course will investigate effects of pollution on earthworms at whole organism, tissue and cellular level following exposure to lead contaminated soils from a former mining site.  Laboratory techniques will include classical morphology and morphometry, use of confocal and light microscopy, immunohistochemistry, heavy metal analyses of soils and worms, DNA barcoding (including DNA extraction, PCR, agarose gel electrophoresis) and bioinformatics.  It thus includes a range of modern techniques used in the study of the structure and function of plants and animals and their tissues.  This course has a limited capacity. Occurrence B (Ecological) - The course is Cardiff based and takes place towards the end of the summer vacation following Year One. Exercises cover a range of field sampling and recording techniques that are used for research in ecology, biology and zoology.  This course has a limited capacity. In order to enrol for this version of Research Techniques, students need to be taking either module BI2152 Ecosystem Processes or module BI2158 Population Ecology. This version may be taken partly through the medium of Welsh, subject to approval by the School's Welsh Language Liaison Officer (Occurrence F). Occurrence C (Microbiological) - This course consists of a complete project where four organisms have to be identified using routine diagnostic tests including cultivation, biochemical and molecular biological analyses. The course continues throughout the Autumn Semester on a weekly basis. Occurrence D (Biomolecular) - The course covers, in a workflow typical for contemporary biomolecular research, the key experimental and bioinformatic methods that are used for detection, isolation, sequencing and analysis of genetic information. Occurrence E (Biomedical) - The course provides insight into the broad range of experimental techniques currently employed in biomedical research. Practical activities include cellular imaging and measurements of neuromuscular transmission, as well as basic laboratory skills and experimental design; students will also address the legislative and ethical aspects of biomedical research.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 100%
Module codeBI2001
LevelL5
SemesterDouble Semester
Credits20

The module aims to provide students with the fundamental experimental, intellectual and generic skills that are essential for design and conduct of research projects, and the evaluation and communication of the resulting data in the existing scientific context. The majority of the 2 semester module will be taught in practical classes and tutorials using experimental tasks which are fundamental for biological, biomedical and/or biomolecular research as appropriate to the degree scheme being followed. The experimental classes will be complemented by tutorials, clinics and lectures on specific and more generic issues such as experimental design, information retrieval and management. The module will be assessed solely on coursework. There are multiple versions of this module: Occurrence A (Biological/Zoological) - The course will investigate effects of pollution on earthworms at whole organism, tissue and cellular level following exposure to lead contaminated soils from a former mining site.  Laboratory techniques will include classical morphology and morphometry, use of confocal and light microscopy, immunohistochemistry, heavy metal analyses of soils and worms, DNA barcoding (including DNA extraction, PCR, agarose gel electrophoresis) and bioinformatics.  It thus includes a range of modern techniques used in the study of the structure and function of plants and animals and their tissues.  This course has a limited capacity. Occurrence B (Ecological) - The course is Cardiff based and takes place towards the end of the summer vacation following Year One. Exercises cover a range of field sampling and recording techniques that are used for research in ecology, biology and zoology.  This course has a limited capacity. In order to enrol for this version of Research Techniques, students need to be taking either module BI2152 Ecosystem Processes or module BI2158 Population Ecology. This version may be taken partly through the medium of Welsh, subject to approval by the School's Welsh Language Liaison Officer (Occurrence F). Occurrence C (Microbiological) - This course consists of a complete project where four organisms have to be identified using routine diagnostic tests including cultivation, biochemical and molecular biological analyses. The course continues throughout the Autumn Semester on a weekly basis. Occurrence D (Biomolecular) - The course covers, in a workflow typical for contemporary biomolecular research, the key experimental and bioinformatic methods that are used for detection, isolation, sequencing and analysis of genetic information. Occurrence E (Biomedical) - The course provides insight into the broad range of experimental techniques currently employed in biomedical research. Practical activities include cellular imaging and measurements of neuromuscular transmission, as well as basic laboratory skills and experimental design; students will also address the legislative and ethical aspects of biomedical research.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 100%
Module codeBI2001
LevelL5
SemesterDouble Semester
Credits20

The module aims to provide students with the fundamental experimental, intellectual and generic skills that are essential for design and conduct of research projects, and the evaluation and communication of the resulting data in the existing scientific context. The majority of the 2 semester module will be taught in practical classes and tutorials using experimental tasks which are fundamental for biological, biomedical and/or biomolecular research as appropriate to the degree scheme being followed. The experimental classes will be complemented by tutorials, clinics and lectures on specific and more generic issues such as experimental design, information retrieval and management. The module will be assessed solely on coursework. There are multiple versions of this module: Occurrence A (Biological/Zoological) - The course will investigate effects of pollution on earthworms at whole organism, tissue and cellular level following exposure to lead contaminated soils from a former mining site.  Laboratory techniques will include classical morphology and morphometry, use of confocal and light microscopy, immunohistochemistry, heavy metal analyses of soils and worms, DNA barcoding (including DNA extraction, PCR, agarose gel electrophoresis) and bioinformatics.  It thus includes a range of modern techniques used in the study of the structure and function of plants and animals and their tissues.  This course has a limited capacity. Occurrence B (Ecological) - The course is Cardiff based and takes place towards the end of the summer vacation following Year One. Exercises cover a range of field sampling and recording techniques that are used for research in ecology, biology and zoology.  This course has a limited capacity. In order to enrol for this version of Research Techniques, students need to be taking either module BI2152 Ecosystem Processes or module BI2158 Population Ecology. This version may be taken partly through the medium of Welsh, subject to approval by the School's Welsh Language Liaison Officer (Occurrence F). Occurrence C (Microbiological) - This course consists of a complete project where four organisms have to be identified using routine diagnostic tests including cultivation, biochemical and molecular biological analyses. The course continues throughout the Autumn Semester on a weekly basis. Occurrence D (Biomolecular) - The course covers, in a workflow typical for contemporary biomolecular research, the key experimental and bioinformatic methods that are used for detection, isolation, sequencing and analysis of genetic information. Occurrence E (Biomedical) - The course provides insight into the broad range of experimental techniques currently employed in biomedical research. Practical activities include cellular imaging and measurements of neuromuscular transmission, as well as basic laboratory skills and experimental design; students will also address the legislative and ethical aspects of biomedical research.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 100%
Module codeBI2001
LevelL5
SemesterDouble Semester
Credits20

The module aims to provide students with the fundamental experimental, intellectual and generic skills that are essential for design and conduct of research projects, and the evaluation and communication of the resulting data in the existing scientific context. The majority of the 2 semester module will be taught in practical classes and tutorials using experimental tasks which are fundamental for biological, biomedical and/or biomolecular research as appropriate to the degree scheme being followed. The experimental classes will be complemented by tutorials, clinics and lectures on specific and more generic issues such as experimental design, information retrieval and management. The module will be assessed solely on coursework. There are multiple versions of this module: Occurrence A (Biological/Zoological) - The course will investigate effects of pollution on earthworms at whole organism, tissue and cellular level following exposure to lead contaminated soils from a former mining site.  Laboratory techniques will include classical morphology and morphometry, use of confocal and light microscopy, immunohistochemistry, heavy metal analyses of soils and worms, DNA barcoding (including DNA extraction, PCR, agarose gel electrophoresis) and bioinformatics.  It thus includes a range of modern techniques used in the study of the structure and function of plants and animals and their tissues.  This course has a limited capacity. Occurrence B (Ecological) - The course is Cardiff based and takes place towards the end of the summer vacation following Year One. Exercises cover a range of field sampling and recording techniques that are used for research in ecology, biology and zoology.  This course has a limited capacity. In order to enrol for this version of Research Techniques, students need to be taking either module BI2152 Ecosystem Processes or module BI2158 Population Ecology. This version may be taken partly through the medium of Welsh, subject to approval by the School's Welsh Language Liaison Officer (Occurrence F). Occurrence C (Microbiological) - This course consists of a complete project where four organisms have to be identified using routine diagnostic tests including cultivation, biochemical and molecular biological analyses. The course continues throughout the Autumn Semester on a weekly basis. Occurrence D (Biomolecular) - The course covers, in a workflow typical for contemporary biomolecular research, the key experimental and bioinformatic methods that are used for detection, isolation, sequencing and analysis of genetic information. Occurrence E (Biomedical) - The course provides insight into the broad range of experimental techniques currently employed in biomedical research. Practical activities include cellular imaging and measurements of neuromuscular transmission, as well as basic laboratory skills and experimental design; students will also address the legislative and ethical aspects of biomedical research.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 100%
Module codeBI2001
LevelL5
SemesterDouble Semester
Credits20

The module aims to provide students with the fundamental experimental, intellectual and generic skills that are essential for design and conduct of research projects, and the evaluation and communication of the resulting data in the existing scientific context. The majority of the 2 semester module will be taught in practical classes and tutorials using experimental tasks which are fundamental for biological, biomedical and/or biomolecular research as appropriate to the degree scheme being followed. The experimental classes will be complemented by tutorials, clinics and lectures on specific and more generic issues such as experimental design, information retrieval and management. The module will be assessed solely on coursework. There are multiple versions of this module: Occurrence A (Biological/Zoological) - The course will investigate effects of pollution on earthworms at whole organism, tissue and cellular level following exposure to lead contaminated soils from a former mining site.  Laboratory techniques will include classical morphology and morphometry, use of confocal and light microscopy, immunohistochemistry, heavy metal analyses of soils and worms, DNA barcoding (including DNA extraction, PCR, agarose gel electrophoresis) and bioinformatics.  It thus includes a range of modern techniques used in the study of the structure and function of plants and animals and their tissues.  This course has a limited capacity. Occurrence B (Ecological) - The course is Cardiff based and takes place towards the end of the summer vacation following Year One. Exercises cover a range of field sampling and recording techniques that are used for research in ecology, biology and zoology.  This course has a limited capacity. In order to enrol for this version of Research Techniques, students need to be taking either module BI2152 Ecosystem Processes or module BI2158 Population Ecology. This version may be taken partly through the medium of Welsh, subject to approval by the School's Welsh Language Liaison Officer (Occurrence F). Occurrence C (Microbiological) - This course consists of a complete project where four organisms have to be identified using routine diagnostic tests including cultivation, biochemical and molecular biological analyses. The course continues throughout the Autumn Semester on a weekly basis. Occurrence D (Biomolecular) - The course covers, in a workflow typical for contemporary biomolecular research, the key experimental and bioinformatic methods that are used for detection, isolation, sequencing and analysis of genetic information. Occurrence E (Biomedical) - The course provides insight into the broad range of experimental techniques currently employed in biomedical research. Practical activities include cellular imaging and measurements of neuromuscular transmission, as well as basic laboratory skills and experimental design; students will also address the legislative and ethical aspects of biomedical research.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 100%
Module codeBI2001
LevelL5
SemesterDouble Semester
Credits20

The module aims to provide students with the fundamental experimental, intellectual and generic skills that are essential for design and conduct of research projects, and the evaluation and communication of the resulting data in the existing scientific context. The majority of the 2 semester module will be taught in practical classes and tutorials using experimental tasks which are fundamental for biological, biomedical and/or biomolecular research as appropriate to the degree scheme being followed. The experimental classes will be complemented by tutorials, clinics and lectures on specific and more generic issues such as experimental design, information retrieval and management. The module will be assessed solely on coursework. There are multiple versions of this module: Occurrence A (Biological/Zoological) - The course will investigate effects of pollution on earthworms at whole organism, tissue and cellular level following exposure to lead contaminated soils from a former mining site.  Laboratory techniques will include classical morphology and morphometry, use of confocal and light microscopy, immunohistochemistry, heavy metal analyses of soils and worms, DNA barcoding (including DNA extraction, PCR, agarose gel electrophoresis) and bioinformatics.  It thus includes a range of modern techniques used in the study of the structure and function of plants and animals and their tissues.  This course has a limited capacity. Occurrence B (Ecological) - The course is Cardiff based and takes place towards the end of the summer vacation following Year One. Exercises cover a range of field sampling and recording techniques that are used for research in ecology, biology and zoology.  This course has a limited capacity. In order to enrol for this version of Research Techniques, students need to be taking either module BI2152 Ecosystem Processes or module BI2158 Population Ecology. This version may be taken partly through the medium of Welsh, subject to approval by the School's Welsh Language Liaison Officer (Occurrence F). Occurrence C (Microbiological) - This course consists of a complete project where four organisms have to be identified using routine diagnostic tests including cultivation, biochemical and molecular biological analyses. The course continues throughout the Autumn Semester on a weekly basis. Occurrence D (Biomolecular) - The course covers, in a workflow typical for contemporary biomolecular research, the key experimental and bioinformatic methods that are used for detection, isolation, sequencing and analysis of genetic information. Occurrence E (Biomedical) - The course provides insight into the broad range of experimental techniques currently employed in biomedical research. Practical activities include cellular imaging and measurements of neuromuscular transmission, as well as basic laboratory skills and experimental design; students will also address the legislative and ethical aspects of biomedical research.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 100%
Module codeBI2110
LevelL5
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits10

This module provides a broad introduction to the study of animal behaviour and presents four perspectives by which behaviour can be explained:

1.         What are the mechanisms that enable behaviour to occur?

2.         How does behaviour develop during the lifetime of an individual animal?

3.         What are the functions of behaviour?

4.         How has behaviour evolved?

The answers to these four questions are illustrated with a wide range of examples and case-studies from the various scientific disciplines concerned with the study of behaviour. The module also highlights the impacts on society that the study of animal behaviour has produced, including how, by studying animal behaviour, we can better understand what it is to be human.

Assessment

  • Examination - autumn semester: 70%
  • Written assessment: 30%
Module codeBI2115
LevelL5
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits10

The aim of this module is to introduce the fascinating diversity of form and function demonstrated by plants, integrating their physiology, biochemistry, anatomy and morphology. Topics include adaptation to land, water, extreme and seasonal habitats. The how and why of plant diversity.

Assessment

  • Examination - autumn semester: 70%
  • Written assessment: 30%
Module codeBI2118
LevelL5
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits20

An evolutionary overview of the diversity of animal life, integrating information on animal classification, phylogenies, body plans, comparative & functional genomics, life-cycles & metamorphosis.  The emphasis will be on ‘design’ and its relationship to environment.

Assessment

  • Examination - autumn semester: 70%
  • Written assessment: 15%
  • Written assessment: 15%
Module codeBI2120
LevelL5
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits10

This module will enable you to appreciate the diversity of microbial cells and how they interact with their environment.  It covers the structure and function of a wide variety of microbes including a range of highly specialised subcellular structures.  A significant proportion of the lectures are dedicated to the understanding of the practical techniques used to study microbial function.  The module has a strong practical emphasis in the lecture content and coursework elements.

Assessment

  • Examination - autumn semester: 70%
  • Written assessment: 30%
Module codeBI2121
LevelL5
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits10

This module will cover the application of modern molecular biology techniques to understanding the ecology and evolution of animals, plants and microbes.  The emphasis will be on taking a holistic approach to understanding environmental structure and function at the molecular level.  It will contextualise the molecular methods used to quantifying and analysing biodiversity within the natural environment from the level of molecular systematics and DNA barcoding of species, through using DNA tools to uncover population history and biology, understanding the molecular basis of evolutionary adaptation, population genetic diversity and finally to the ecology of individual organisms.  Basic principles of molecular systematics (including phylogenomics), molecular evolution including adaptation, phylogeography, population genetics, population genomics and modern DNA profiling will be covered using a mixture of lectures and in silico practicals involving data-handling, bioinformatics tools and interpretive analysis (four practicals, including bioinformatics, molecular systematics, genome scans and DNA profile analysis).

Assessment

  • Examination - autumn semester: 70%
  • Written assessment: 30%
Module codeBI2150
LevelL5
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits10

The module aims to provide students with a thorough appreciation of how animals have evolved physiological and behavioural adaptations enabling them to survive and successfully complete their life-cycles in environments that, from an anthropocentric viewpoint, may be considered extreme in one or more ways. The module will be taught through a combination of lectures, practicals and self-directed learning.

Assessment

  • Examination - spring semester: 70%
  • Written assessment: 20%
  • Written assessment: 10%
Module codeBI2152
LevelL5
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits10

Ecosystem processes play an essential role in promoting and sustaining “life on earth”.  What are ecosystem processes?  Why are they important?  In this module we explore in detail a series of ecosystem processes (e.g. primary productivity, decomposition, nutrient cycling) in both terrestrial and aquatic (freshwater and marine) environments.  Ecosystem processes are explored from a conceptual perspective, using results from observational and empirical field and laboratory studies to evaluate theoretical predictions, and by analysing in detail a number of ecological case-studies. The module aims to highlight both the complexity of each individual process and the interactions that occur between different processes.  The relationship between biodiversity, conservation and ecosystem function is considered and the module concludes by exploring the economic value of ecosystem processes within both a social and political context.

Assessment

  • Examination - spring semester: 70%
  • Practical-based assessment: 10%
  • Class test: 20%
Module codeBI2152
LevelL5
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits10

Ecosystem processes play an essential role in promoting and sustaining “life on earth”.  What are ecosystem processes?  Why are they important?  In this module we explore in detail a series of ecosystem processes (e.g. primary productivity, decomposition, nutrient cycling) in both terrestrial and aquatic (freshwater and marine) environments.  Ecosystem processes are explored from a conceptual perspective, using results from observational and empirical field and laboratory studies to evaluate theoretical predictions, and by analysing in detail a number of ecological case-studies. The module aims to highlight both the complexity of each individual process and the interactions that occur between different processes.  The relationship between biodiversity, conservation and ecosystem function is considered and the module concludes by exploring the economic value of ecosystem processes within both a social and political context.

Assessment

  • Examination - spring semester: 70%
  • Practical-based assessment: 10%
  • Class test: 20%
Module codeBI2156
LevelL5
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits10

The module provides an insight into the ways in which pathogenic microbes interact with the host defence and the mechanisms by which microbes cause human disease. The strategies for the prevention and control of disease by immunoprophylaxis and chemotherapy (antimicrobials and their modes of action, drug resistance) are reviewed.

Assessment

  • Examination - spring semester: 70%
  • Written assessment: 30%
Module codeBI2157
LevelL5
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits10

The module comprises a combination of lectures and practicals in which plant development is studied from fertilisation of the egg to embryogenesis, through to the establishment of root apical meristems and vegetative and floral shoot apical meristems. Emphasis is given to phenotypic assessment of developmental mutants of the model plant, Arabidopsis thaliana with emphasis on understanding the role of transcription factors and homeotic genes during development. Understanding the role of plant growth regulators in the development is a theme interwoven throughout the module. Water relations and how environmental factors influence development is a physiological slant that completes this module.

Assessment

  • Examination - spring semester: 70%
  • Written assessment: 30%
Module codeBI2158
LevelL5
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits10

The primary purpose of this module is to demonstrate that population ecology is fundamental to all aspects of Ecology. It will cover everything from fundamental and theoretical principles right through to the practical methods of studying and gathering data in the field. Case studies will be used throughout to provide contemporary illustrations of how population ecology theory works in practice. Population growth and regulation of both plants and animals will be covered together with the, often complex, interactions between plants, herbivores and natural enemies. Part of this work will be to demonstrate how modelling of the factors affecting changes in populations can be used to better understand the processes involved and predict likely outcomes. The module will emphasise the connection between theory and practice, showing how an understanding of demographic processes is essential in fields such as agriculture and conservation.

Assessment

  • Examination - spring semester: 70%
  • Written assessment: 30%
Module codeBI2161
LevelL5
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits10

In this module you will explore the diversity and evolutionary relationships between the major groups of microorganisms: Archaea, Bacteria, Fungi, Protozoa and Algae.  The modern methods of molecular genetic analysis (DNA- and RNA-based) of microbial taxonomic groups are described and compared with conventional micro-morphological, cultivation- and isolation-dependent approaches.  Current ideas about the evolution of microbial life on Earth and diversification to form prokaryotic and eukaryotic lineages will be introduced.  Ways in which organisms are classified and identified, and biological and phylogenetic species concepts will be considered.  Examples of microbial communities and multicellular microorganisms will be used to illustrate the diversity of interacting prokaryotes and eukaryotes.  Training in basic skills for handling non-pathogenic microbes will be provided.

Assessment

  • Examination - spring semester: 70%
  • Class test: 30%
Module codeBI2162
LevelL5
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits10

Microorganisms are crucial to “life on earth”. They form beneficial relationships with plants, animals and other microbes allowing both partners to thrive, but they also have detrimental relationships with some organisms. In this module we explore in detail these relationships, and interactions with the abiotic environment, in both terrestrial and aquatic (freshwater and marine) environments. These interactions are examined from a conceptual perspective, and by considering detailed case-studies. The crucial role that microbes play in primary production, decomposition and nutrient transformations and cycling is also explained, as well as associations between microbial community structure, function and environment, including climate change associations.

Assessment

  • Examination - spring semester: 70%
  • Practical-based assessment: 15%
  • Written assessment: 15%
Module codeBI2163
LevelL5
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits20

The module focusses on major elements of cell biology in plants and animals i.e. cell structure and function, cellular communication, the role of cells in the immune system and programmed cell death. By taking a comparative approach either at the level of plants and animals or comparing cell biological processes between lower and higher animals, the module will illustrate not just the unique elements possessed by plants and animals which allow their cellular function but the evolutionary development and increasing complexity of cell biological systems from insects through to mammals.

Assessment

  • Examination - spring semester: 70%
  • Class test: 10%
  • Written assessment: 20%
Module codeBI2201
LevelL5
SemesterDouble Semester
Credits20

A 20-credit module that will teach modern biochemical methodologies, data analysis, quantitative analysis and reporting skills.

Co-Requisite Module: BI2001 Research Techniques

Assessment

  • Class test: 5%
  • Class test: 5%
  • Class test: 5%
  • Class test: 5%
  • Class test: 5%
  • Written assessment: 15%
  • Practical-based assessment: 15%
  • Written assessment: 40%
  • Practical-based assessment: 5%
Module codeBI2203
LevelL5
SemesterDouble Semester
Credits20

The past two decades have seen a revolution in our understanding of genetics and molecular biology as projects to sequence the genome of humans and many other species have come to fruition.  The module will cover fundamental aspects of molecular genetics including the topics of gene mapping, mutagenesis, complementation, recombination, transposition, DNA exchange, and DNA repair.  Gene structure and regulation will be discussed in both eukaryotic and prokaryotic organisms, as will genome organisation.  Recent findings from the human genome project will be covered, including the application of these data to the understanding of molecular basis of diseases like cancer.  Key techniques involved in the investigation of genes and genomes will be described and illustrated with respect to appropriate examples.

Assessment

  • Examination - spring semester: 70%
  • Written assessment: 15%
  • Written assessment: 5%
  • Written assessment: 5%
  • Written assessment: 5%
Module codeBI2215
LevelL5
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits10

This single module deals at an intermediate level with the molecular basis of the catalytic and allosteric properties of enzymes together with the study of structure-function relationships in other functional proteins.  Topics include protein structure determination with particular reference to inhibitor/drug design; the structural basis of oxidative phosphorylation and photosynthesis; the evolution, specificity, and regulation of the Serine protease family; the molecular basis of enzyme regulation with specific reference to the regulation of glycolysis and the citric acid cycle; protein purification.

Assessment

  • Examination - autumn semester: 70%
  • Written assessment: 30%
Module codeBI2217
LevelL5
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits10

The module provides an insight into the role of non-bacterial infectious agents in the broad context of infectious diseases based on the structure and features of the pathogens and their interactions with the hosts. Topics covered will include: viral life cycle and pathogenesis, diagnostics and therapy, human and plant viral and fungal diseases, human parasites and disease and prion diseases.

Assessment

  • Examination - autumn semester: 70%
  • Practical-based assessment: 30%
Module codeBI2218
LevelL5
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits10

The module will enable students to relate their understanding of the biosciences (underpinning many modern processes) to how basic research has been developed within the sphere of Biotechnology. The principles and applications in areas of healthcare, medical diagnostics, agriculture, environmental monitoring, industrial production, bioremediation and food and drink biotechnology are covered. The module emphasises the importance of modern molecular biology and molecular genetics in the development of biotechnology.

Assessment

  • Examination - autumn semester: 70%
  • Written assessment: 30%
Module codeBI2219
LevelL5
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits20

This 20-credit module considers the cellular and molecular aspects of the blood and immune system, in particular the interaction between plasma proteins and the cellular units.  It covers the role of cells and proteins in immunity and in aspects of haematology in the normal situation and in disease.  The module emphasises the requirement for regulation of plasma proteins and examines the consequences of dysregulation of the immune response and defects in haematological proteins.  It also examines the consequence of acquired and inherited disease on blood components.  The module subsequently considers the fundamentals of metabolic regulation and how numerous metabolic processes of multicellular organisms are integrated and coordinated in a variety of normal and disease states.

Assessment

  • Examination - autumn semester: 70%
  • Written assessment: 30%
Module codeBI2220
LevelL5
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits20

The field of genetics is a large, complex rapidly expanding science. Discoveries in genetics are numerous and profound; to appreciate the dynamic nature of this subject it is essential to develop your knowledge from a broad base of the general principles of cytogenetics, transmission genetics, population genetics before exploring the exciting new horizons and new technologies that have been the result of the human and other genome projects. These advances have led to innovation in plant and animal genomics, DNA forensics, personalised medicine and epigenetics. The new understanding of how genes behave has seen developments in agriculture, medicine and science. These changes are reflected in advances in animal and plant breeding and our understanding of complex diseases such as cancer and cardiovascular disease. With this knowledge comes social and ethical responsibility for the individual and the environment, which puts genetics on the map for policy makers and legislators who will increasingly rely on scientists for a detailed knowledge of genetics.

Assessment

  • Examination - autumn semester: 70%
  • Practical-based assessment: 15%
  • Written assessment: 15%
Module codeBI2255
LevelL5
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits10

A 10-credit practical module that will teach modern biochemical methodologies, data analysis and reporting skills.

Co-Requisite Module: BI2001 Research Techniques.

Assessment

  • Written assessment: 25%
  • Practical-based assessment: 25%
  • Written assessment: 40%
  • Practical-based assessment: 10%
Module codeBI2256
LevelL5
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits10

Biotechnology is a vibrant and expanding area within the UK and the wider-world.  Coupled with recent advances in biological knowledge bases, e.g. the human genome, developments within this field will undoubtedly have a dramatic impact on all aspects of modern life from healthcare to nanotechnology.  This module takes the knowledge base from general biotechnology and applies it specifically to recent biotechnological developments.  It also provides a basic introduction to business and legal aspects of biotechnology research and development. The module will enable the student to relate their understanding of the bioscience that underpins many modern processes and to see how basic research has been developed and commercialised within the sphere of biotechnology.

Precursor module: BI2218 Concepts in Biotechnology

Assessment

  • Practical-based assessment: 25%
  • Written assessment: 25%
  • Practical-based assessment: 20%
  • Written assessment: 30%
Module codeBI2257
LevelL5
SemesterDouble Semester
Credits20

This module focusses on the molecular aspects of cell biology and cell structure, including cell structure and function; intra- and inter-cell communication and signalling, and the relationship between cell biology and disease.

Cell structure and function

This aspect of the module will focus on: The interactions between the nucleus and the cytoplasm; the structure of the plasma membrane and membane proteins; a detailed analysis of organelle structure, function and biogenesis; the detailed structure and function of cytoskeleton and its components; the role of the cytoskeleton in cell movement; membrane trafficking through the ER and Golgi and the mechanisms of endocytosis and secretion; The structure and role of the Extra-cellular matrix; Organelle development and the consequences of organelle malfunction.

Cell communication and signalling

This aspect of the module will focus on the biochemical mechanisms involved in intercellular and intracellular communication. The material will address cellular signalling mechanisms in eukaryotes (animals and plants), signalling by hydrophobic and hydrophilic ligands, calcium signalling, plant signalling responses, signalling in health and disease, lipids in cell signalling, and techniques for delineating signal transduction pathways.

Cellular energetics and dynamics

This aspect of the module deals with cellular and molecular aspects of how organelles (mitochindria and chloroplasts) transduce energy and synthesise storable energy for the cell.

Cell cycle and the significance of stem cells

This aspect of the module introduces the genetic control of the cell cycle and the use of stem cells in research and therapy.

Assessment

  • Examination - spring semester: 70%
  • Written assessment: 10%
  • Written assessment: 20%
Module codeBI2258
LevelL5
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits20

Developmental biology is the study of the remarkable transformation of a single cell zygote into a complex multicellular organism.  From a basis in classic experimental embryology, the module explores the cellular, molecular and genetic mechanisms of embryonic development, which place current developmental biology at the nexus of these disciplines.  The concepts and principles of development are illustrated through varied examples, and the molecular mechanisms that are conserved between species are highlighted.  The module includes early embryonic development and axis formation, cell differentiation, and generation of pattern and form.  Consideration of embryonic and adult stem cells is integrated into the module.  The investigative techniques used to research developmental mechanisms are explored in the context of the relevant model organisms.

Assessment

  • Examination - spring semester: 70%
  • Practical-based assessment: 15%
  • Written assessment: 5%
  • Written assessment: 10%
Module codeBI2301
LevelL5
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits20

This double module presents the structure and major connections of the main regions of the human central nervous system. Topics include: Cells of the central nervous system; Spinal cord: structure, descending and ascending pathways; Autonomic nervous system; Brainstem: cranial nerve nuclei and connections, brainstem tracts, reticular formation, blood supply and ischaemia; Cerebellum and basal ganglia and their roles in motor control; Hypothalamus, thalamus and their main connections; Auditory and visual pathways; Limbic system; Cerebral cortex.

Assessment

  • Examination - autumn semester: 60%
  • Practical-based assessment: 30%
  • Written assessment: 10%
Module codeBI2302
LevelL5
SemesterDouble Semester
Credits20

This 20-credit module focuses on understanding the acute physiological and metabolic responses to physical exercise, and the chronic adaptations that occur in response to training.  The module uses the challenge of exercise to take a systematic and integrated approach to understanding human physiology.  The module will consider the mechanisms by which the metabolic demands of exercise are coupled to the supply of substrates and oxygen, as well as the removal of metabolic by-products.  The influence of genetics, diet, climate and pharmacological intervention on sporting performance will be discussed.

Assessment

  • Examination - spring semester: 70%
  • Written assessment: 15%
  • Written assessment: 15%
  • Practical-based assessment: 0%
  • Practical-based assessment: 0%
Module codeBI2303
LevelL5
SemesterDouble Semester
Credits20

This 20-credit module will deal with kidney, cardiovascular, respiratory and endocrine/metabolic, skeletal muscle and liver pathophysiology. Pathophysiology is the physiology of altered health, and the term comes from the words pathology and physiology. Pathology deals with the study of the structural and functional changes in cells, tissues and organs of the body that cause or are caused by disease. Physiology deals with the functions of the human body. Thus, this pathophysiology module will deal not only with the cellular and organ changes that occur with disease, but with the effects that these changes have on total body function. The module will also focus on the mechanisms of the underlying disease and will provide the background for preventative as well as therapeutic health care measures.

Assessment

  • Examination - spring semester: 70%
  • Written assessment: 15%
  • Written assessment: 15%
Module codeBI2304
LevelL5
SemesterDouble Semester
Credits20

Principles of how neurons and other excitable cells process information electrically, using their membranes. Principles of synaptic transmission. This module is challenging, but ultimately rewarding. There is plenty of practice material.

 

  1. Ion gradients and selective permeability produce ‘concentration’ batteries (Nernst, equilibrium, reversal potentials).
  2. Membrane conductances, driving voltage, current.
  3. Membrane capacitance integrates currents over time, accumulating opposite charges on opposite surfaces of the membrane, which produces a voltage across it. Membrane integration cycle. Membrane time constant.
  4. Resting membrane potential: Vm at which there is zero net current. Dominated by K+ channels and, in many neurons (to lesser extent) non-selective cation leak channels. Cl- channels important in skeletal muscle.
  5. Action potentials: voltage-dependent Na+ and K+ (and Ca2+) ion channels, threshold, generation, positive feedback underlying upstroke; APs all-or-none but not identical, propagation, myelination and other factors affecting speed and efficiency.
  6. Recording techniques: extracellular electrodes (field potentials and spikes), sharp electrodes, patch pipettes, voltage clamp (negative feedback amplifier to impose a command voltage across membrane and record ‘clamp’ currents needed to achieve this, which are opposite to the biological currents).
  7. Pumps and transporters; energetics of membranes, passive vs. active transport, primary vs. secondary active transport.
  8. Ion channels: K+, Na+, Ca2+, non-selective cation, Cl-, ligand- and transmitter-gated. Different sub-types, define physiologically, pharmacologically and structurally.
  9. Synaptic physiology: electrical (gap junction) vs. chemical synapses: boutons, vesicles and vesicle cycle and filling, calcium-dependent and spontaneous release, release machinery, recycling, transmitters, receptors, synaptic conductances and currents, how latter are integrated by membrane capacitance to give post-synaptic potentials. Ionotropic vs. metabotropic receptors.
  10. Dendritic and neural integration, axial charge spread, cable properties (passive and active), most important ion channels in dendrites and how they shape responses; dendritic spikes, plateau potentials and membrane bistability.

 

Online Sources:

  • Lecture notes.
  • Membrane Bioelectricity booklet; self-test questions (answers at end).
  • Cell Circuits Practical Manuals.
  • Formative online computer-marked tests, with detailed instant feedback.
  • Uploaded chapters and papers.

 

Assessment

  • Examination - spring semester: 25%
  • Examination - spring semester: 45%
  • Class test: 0%
  • Class test: 5%
  • Class test: 25%
Module codeBI2305
LevelL5
SemesterDouble Semester
Credits20

The field of medical genetics is a large, complex rapidly expanding science. Discoveries in genetics are numerous and profound; to appreciate the dynamic nature of this subject it is essential to develop your knowledge from a broad base of the general principles of molecular and cytogenetics, transmission genetics, gene behaviour and techniques for analysing genes and chromosomes. As well as exploring the exciting new horizons and new technologies that have been the result of the human genome project you will explore the innovations, which have led to, advances in medical science in predictive testing, diagnostics and personalised medicine. You will also investigate the technologies that allow a new understanding of genetic disease including multifactorial and complex diseases such as cancer and cardiovascular disease. With this knowledge comes social and ethical responsibility for the individual and you thus you will explore ethical issues, screening and the field of genetic counselling. Collectively this puts genetics on the map for policy makers and legislators who will increasingly rely on scientists for a detailed knowledge of medical genetics.

Assessment

  • Examination - spring semester: 70%
  • Practical-based assessment: 30%
Module codeBI2306
LevelL5
SemesterDouble Semester
Credits20

This module provides theoretical and practical knowledge of the structure and function of animal tissues, with particular focus on the biology of connective tissues in health and disease.

Maximum number on module: 35

Assessment

  • Examination - spring semester: 70%
  • Written assessment: 15%
  • Written assessment: 15%
Module codeBI2322
LevelL5
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits20

This module will give you a sound overview of physiology and pharmacology in the central nervous system.  General pharmacological principles will be covered early in the module, including drug receptor interactions, dose response curves, side effects and adverse drug reactions. The physiology of neurotransmitters (Acetylcholine, Glutamate, GABA, Dopamine, Nor-adrenaline and 5HT) will be discussed in detail, alongside the pharmacological actions of agonists and antagonists. The module will also include lectures on pain, somatosensory physiology, movement, and the role of cortical areas in integration and higher functions. You will be provided with several opportunities to develop your critical evaluation skills and will receive guidance and feedback on preparing and delivering high quality research presentations.

Assessment

  • Examination - autumn semester: 70%
  • Practical-based assessment: 30%
Module codeBI2323
LevelL5
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits20

This module provides practical experience, knowledge and understanding of the gross and functional anatomy and the development of the human thorax, abdomen, pelvis and perineum.

Maximum number on module: 50

Assessment

  • Examination - autumn semester: 50%
  • Practical-based assessment: 10%
  • Written assessment: 10%
  • Practical-based assessment: 30%
Module codeBI2356
LevelL5
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits10

This module describes the homeostatic mechanisms underlying the endocrine and paracrine regulation of such diverse physiological functions as growth, and energy and water balance. Teaching of hormone secretion, hormone-receptor interactions and intracellular signalling pathways will provide a basis for understanding the complex, multilayered systems, and the way in which they interact within the whole organism.

Assessment

  • Examination - spring semester: 80%
  • Written assessment: 20%
Module codeBI2357
LevelL5
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits10

The aim of this module is to develop knowledge and understanding of the processes involved in the reception and transduction of information by the organs of the special senses (vision, hearing, taste, and olfaction), and processing of this information by the brain. Topics included will be: anatomical features of the eyes, ears and organs of taste and olfaction. Mechanisms involved in the reception and transduction of visual, auditory, gustatory and olfactory stimuli. Vestibular function of the ear. Pathways and mechanisms involved in the processing of information from the special sense organs. Practicals on the auditory evoked potential and the influence of aromachemicals on brain wave activity will reinforce the learning outcomes.

Assessment

  • Examination - spring semester: 70%
  • Written assessment: 30%
Module codeBI2358
LevelL5
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits20

This module will give you an understanding of human limb anatomy from the development of the limbs during embryological life, to the detailed gross anatomy of the upper and lower limb in an adult.  The module is almost entirely self-directed, with full dissection of both the upper and lower limb being completed.  You will also have the opportunity to study the functional aspects of limb anatomy, with some reference to clinical, sectional and radiological anatomy to support your learning.

Assessment

  • Examination - spring semester: 50%
  • Practical-based assessment: 20%
  • Practical-based assessment: 30%
Module codeBI3110
LevelL6
SemesterDouble Semester
Credits20

This module is intended to extend the survey and assessment skills of students studying towards a degree in Ecology. The course involves field visits as well as an accompanying series of lectures. Students will receive instruction in the identification and appropriate survey techniques for a variety of plant and animal taxa. Visits will also be made to a range of habitats so that students can learn about habitat classification and species identification. Relevant aspects of environmental legislation will also be covered as will environmental impact assessment and GIS. Students will be given the opportunity to perform an ecological assessment in a practical exercise at the end of the course.

Assessment

  • Examination - spring semester: 60%
  • Written assessment: 5%
  • Written assessment: 20%
  • Practical-based assessment: 15%
Module codeBI3114
LevelL6
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits20

This module will cover the basic science and main issues underpinning biological conservation. Topics such as biodiversity, extinction and endangered species management will lead into a more in-depth examination of the biology of endangered species, including genetics, ecology and behaviour. Such information will then equip the student for an in-depth study of population viability analysis, which will include practical population modelling using simulation and the discussion and preparation of endangered species recovery plans.

Assessment

  • Examination - spring semester: 60%
  • Written assessment: 40%
Module codeBI3126
LevelL6
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits20

Bacterial and viral infections are a major cause of human disease and death. The module will summarise the pathogenesis, diagnosis, treatment and control of human infectious diseases. The infectious diseases covered include: cystic fibrosis lung infections (Pseudomonas and Burkholderia bacteria), meningitis, multidrug resistant bacterial infections, major diarrheal pathogens (Salmonella, Vibrio, Escherichia and Shigella bacteria, gastric viruses and microeukaryotes), tuberculosis and Human Immunodeficiency Virus and malaria. The role of conventional diagnostics and public health laboratories in the identification and control of infection will be analysed. The dilemma of emerging drug resistance and lack of novel therapeutics for infections will be debated. Cross-cutting themes related and discussed across the module include: disease pathogenesis; the use of molecular techniques for the diagnosis of infectious diseases; molecular and genomic methods used to understand epidemiology and track transmissible infections, and dissect the role of the wider human microbiome in relation to health and disease; the molecular targets of therapeutic strategies such as drugs and vaccines; and the evolution of pathogen virulence or resistance to treatment. In addition to the diseases listed above and summarised during the lectures, students will undertake self-directed research on other bacterial, fungal and viral and parasitic human diseases as part of the module coursework to gain a broad, research-led understanding of infectious diseases.

Assessment

  • Examination - spring semester: 80%
  • Practical-based assessment: 6%
  • Written assessment: 14%
Module codeBI3127
LevelL6
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits20

Parasitism can be considered a paradox: on the one hand, parasites are attributed with generating host diversity and yet, on the other, they can lead to population extinctions. This module explores the dualities of parasitism by assessing the costs and benefits that parasites inflict on their hosts. We will investigate fundamental questions, such as Do parasites affect ecosystem functioning and biodiversity? How do parasites affect host behaviour? and Does parasitism increase in severity with reduced biodiversity? As well as providing some surprising facts and figures about the most abundant group of animals on the planet, this parasitology course will make you question the true nature of many biological interactions.

Assessment

  • Examination - spring semester: 80%
  • Written assessment: 20%
Module codeBI3130
LevelL6
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits20

The module deals with key topics in plant biology, with an emphasis on their application to genetically manipulated plants and their current and potential future use in agriculture and other commercial processes. It covers a wide range of GM crop applications including disease and pest resistance, enhanced yield and enhanced quality of the harvested product. It also deals with the environmental and legislative issues relating to GM technology and the use of GM products. The module also covers other aspects of applied plant science such as male sterility in plants and its commercial exploitation, antibodies produced by plants, plant breeding, the engineering of enhanced productivity and other current or potential uses of plants e.g. for biofuel production or for remediating contaminated land. The emphasis in the module is on the applications of the technology rather than on the molecular processes involved in producing transformed plants.

Assessment

  • Examination - spring semester: 80%
  • Practical-based assessment: 6%
  • Written assessment: 14%
Module codeBI3132
LevelL6
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits20

This module aims to develop an advanced understanding of the science(s) of animal behaviour through a series of four central “topics”.  Each topic will focus on a major issue in behavioural research, highlighting tools and techniques, the latest advances, on-going debates and the major unanswered questions.  Each topic will comprise 3-4 lectures, together with a related research-led case study.  Field trips, class fieldwork (the basis of the coursework assessment) and guided reading materials will be used to provide a range of learning opportunities to complement the lecture format.

Precursor Module: BI2110 Animal Behaviour: An Introduction

Assessment

  • Examination - spring semester: 70%
  • Written assessment: 30%
Module codeBI3133
LevelL6
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits20

Microbes show an amazing variety of mechanisms to adapt to changes in their environment, which do not involve changes in their genomes.  These physiological and biochemical mechanisms will be explored in this module with particular reference to very well characterised systems supported by a broad set of research-literature.  A research-led discussion of microbial systems spanning fundamental processes such as metal resistance, to specialist physiology such as secretion, quorum sensing and bioluminescence will be presented in a series of taught lectures. State-of-the art methods used to study microbial physiology and biochemistry such as metabolomics and genomics will also be discussed. Cross-module themes such as energy generation, catabolism, genetic pathways and co-ordinate regulation of gene expression in physiological responses and applicable research methods will be discussed within each lecture topic as appropriate to provide students with a broad understanding of current microbial physiology and biochemistry. Overall, the module will aim to provide the students with an integrated understanding of microbial physiology and biochemistry and how multiple systems interact to allow micro-organisms to grow, tolerate and adapt to different environments.

Precursor Module: BI2120 Microbial Function

Assessment

  • Examination - spring semester: 80%
  • Practical-based assessment: 7%
  • Written assessment: 13%
Module codeBI3134
LevelL6
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits20

This module will outline the global challenges faced by freshwater and marine resources. Aquatic ecosystems around the world are threatened by changes in land use, exploitation (including fishing), water cycles and habitat loss. All of these affect the structure and functioning of freshwater and marine ecosystems, and therefore their ecosystem services (e.g. the critically important provision of food from fisheries, irrigation and drinking water, regulation of biogeochemical balances, and enrichment of aesthetic and cultural experience). Understanding and predicting the responses of aquatic ecosystems and these services to global and local change is essential for protecting human health as well as biodiversity.  The module will include case studies of impacted aquatic ecosystem services and exploited fish stocks and marine mammals at the single species and ecosystem levels. The historical development of fisheries exploitation will be linked to technological advances in fishing gear. Approaches to management of fisheries will be evaluated. Conservation techniques for overcoming current and future challenges will be considered. For example, Aquaculture will be introduced as an alternative means of seafood production and criteria for selection of species will be considered along with a range of approaches for increasing production, such as stock enhancement.

Assessment

  • Examination - spring semester: 80%
  • Written assessment: 20%
Module codeBI3134
LevelL6
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits20

This module will outline the global challenges faced by freshwater and marine resources. Aquatic ecosystems around the world are threatened by changes in land use, exploitation (including fishing), water cycles and habitat loss. All of these affect the structure and functioning of freshwater and marine ecosystems, and therefore their ecosystem services (e.g. the critically important provision of food from fisheries, irrigation and drinking water, regulation of biogeochemical balances, and enrichment of aesthetic and cultural experience). Understanding and predicting the responses of aquatic ecosystems and these services to global and local change is essential for protecting human health as well as biodiversity.  The module will include case studies of impacted aquatic ecosystem services and exploited fish stocks and marine mammals at the single species and ecosystem levels. The historical development of fisheries exploitation will be linked to technological advances in fishing gear. Approaches to management of fisheries will be evaluated. Conservation techniques for overcoming current and future challenges will be considered. For example, Aquaculture will be introduced as an alternative means of seafood production and criteria for selection of species will be considered along with a range of approaches for increasing production, such as stock enhancement.

Assessment

  • Examination - spring semester: 80%
  • Written assessment: 20%
Module codeBI3136
LevelL6
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits20

Founded on an understanding of the historical, geological and physical context of global climate change this module explores the biological and ecological consequences of climatic variation.  This will be done using a range of taxonomic, organisational (individual, population, community and ecosystem) and ecosystem studies.  Global climate change ecology will also be considered within a natural resource (forest, marine) perspective; and the economic, political and social context will be considered.

Precursor Module: BI2152 Ecosystem Processes

Assessment

  • Examination - spring semester: 80%
  • Written assessment: 20%
Module codeBI3136
LevelL6
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits20

Founded on an understanding of the historical, geological and physical context of global climate change this module explores the biological and ecological consequences of climatic variation.  This will be done using a range of taxonomic, organisational (individual, population, community and ecosystem) and ecosystem studies.  Global climate change ecology will also be considered within a natural resource (forest, marine) perspective; and the economic, political and social context will be considered.

Precursor Module: BI2152 Ecosystem Processes

Assessment

  • Examination - spring semester: 80%
  • Written assessment: 20%
Module codeBI3211
LevelL6
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits20

This module describes current understanding of, and research into, the mechanisms underlying the regulation of eukaryotic gene expression.   The module will address transcriptional control, RNA processing, epigenetic control of gene expression, translational control and how signal transduction pathways modulate gene expression during physiological and pathophysiological conditions.

Precursor Modules: BI2203 Genes to Genomes: From Microbes to Mammals or BI2305 Medical Genetics

Assessment

  • Examination - spring semester: 80%
  • Class test: 10%
  • Written assessment: 10%
Module codeBI3212
LevelL6
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits20

This module will advance students' understanding of modern applications of genetic manipulation with particular regard to the genetic engineering of micro-organisms and plants, and biotechnological applications of genetic manipulation. The course will develop students' analytical skills and their ability to evaluate the relevant advanced scientific literature.

Precursor Modules: BI2218 Concepts in Biotechnology or BI2203 Genes to Genomes: From Microbes to Mammals

Assessment

  • Examination - spring semester: 80%
  • Written assessment: 20%
Module codeBI3216
LevelL6
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits20

This is a research-led module that focuses on the current research interests of members of staff within the School of Biosciences.  The module is most suitable for those students considering a career in research.  This module will provide students with up-to-date scientific information and background knowledge behind the biomedical research techniques used to study diseases using examples from yeast, Drosophila, Xenopus and mice.  Areas that will be covered are neurodegeneration, cancer, heart and muscle disease and epigenetic-driven disease.

Precursor Modules: BI2203 Genes to Genomes: From Microbes to Mammals or BI2305 Medical Genetics or BI2220 Applied and Human Genetics

Assessment

  • Examination - spring semester: 80%
  • Practical-based assessment: 20%
Module codeBI3218
LevelL6
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits20

Proteins are responsible for most of the processes required for life. This module will introduce the student to advanced topics concerning the relationship of the three key properties of proteins: structure, function and folding. Various different systems will be used to illustrate how the function of a protein is dependent on its 3D shape. The module will also describe the process of protein folding, in which the linear sequence of amino acids is translated to a structure with a defined shape and function. The module will also illustrate how the dynamic structure of proteins is important for function. Furthermore, the module will describe how introducing changes to the amino sequence can alter the structural, functional and folding properties of a protein. Topics within this module will also include how proteins interact with other proteins and other molecules and metals. Such interactions are important for the biological function of a protein and for regulating biological processes. As part of the assessment for this module, the student will learn how the amino acid sequence of a protein can be used to find out information on its structure and function.

Precursor Module: BI2215 Protein Biochemistry and Enzymology

Assessment

  • Examination - spring semester: 80%
  • Written assessment: 20%
Module codeBI3221
LevelL6
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits20

This module focuses on discussion of the current research and understanding of the role, origin, function and importance of biological membranes. Student learning will focus on the biochemical structure of cellular membranes, their metabolism and biogenesis, and a review of the current discussion over their function within the cell. The many processes involved in intracellular membrane dynamics and transport are currently subjects of considerable debate, with new theories challenging existing accepted dogma. The key subjects of these debates will be discussed. The plasma membrane contains many protein complexes involved in communicating signals from the external environment to the cell. The role of membranes in cell signalling will be discussed, focussing on the role of cell surface receptors in cellular communication and signal transduction. The role of membranes in intracellular transport will be discussed in detail regarding a number of different areas of current research.

Precursor Modules: BI2257 Molecular Cell Biology or BI2163 Comparative Cell Biology and Cell Death

Assessment

  • Examination - spring semester: 80%
  • Written assessment: 20%
Module codeBI3223
LevelL6
SemesterDouble Semester
Credits20

The central aim of this module is to understand the development of different cell types and tissues/organs, with an emphasis on the underlying genetic, molecular and cellular mechanisms.  This will be integrated with selected topics in stem cell biology.  The module is centred on research strengths in the School of Biosciences, e.g. muscle, heart and nerve.  The relevance of Develomental and Stem Cell Biology to guiding new therapeutic approaches will also be highlighted.  A background in Developmental Biology is recommended, but is not essential.

Maximum number on module: 100

Assessment

  • Examination - spring semester: 80%
  • Written assessment: 20%
Module codeBI3224
LevelL6
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits20

It is the finely tuned balance at the molecular level of cell cycle events and programmed cell death that ensures the homeostatic control of the growth and maintenance of eukaryotic cells and tissues. In this regard, the module will provide an understanding of the molecular mechanisms that regulate both these essential biological processes in eukaryotes. Furthermore, in addition to gaining knowledge on the normal regulatory mechanisms involved, the module will also include information on events that result in the deregulation of the cell cycle and programmed cell death, ultimately leading to disease states such as cancer, as an example.

Precursor Modules: BI2163 Comparative Cell Biology and Cell Death or BI2257 Molecular Cell Biology or BI2203 Genes to Genomes: From Microbes to Mammals

Assessment

  • Examination - spring semester: 80%
  • Written assessment: 20%
Module codeBI3311
LevelL6
SemesterDouble Semester
Credits20

An extended course in cell physiology, based upon current research literature. Critical assessment of these papers will be required in the preparation of short seminars to be given by the students.

Precursor Modules: BI2001 Research Techniques (Version 5) and BI2303 Human Pathophysiology and BI2304 Membrane and Synaptic Physiology and BI2322 Physiology and Pharmacology of the CNS and BI2356 Signalling in Endocrine Systems and BI2357 Special Senses.

Assessment

  • Examination - spring semester: 80%
  • Written assessment: 10%
  • Practical-based assessment: 10%
Module codeBI3315
LevelL6
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits20

The course provides students with an understanding of the molecular mechanisms which underlie normal and impaired brain function.

Precursor Module: BI2322 Physiology and Pharmacology of the CNS

Assessment

  • Examination - spring semester: 80%
  • Practical-based assessment: 20%
Module codeBI3316
LevelL6
SemesterDouble Semester
Credits20

This module provides a comprehensive coverage of the mechanisms underlying neuronal development and pattern formation in the developing nervous system and also plasticity and age-related changes in the mature nervous system.  It draws on expertise within BIOSI to give a research-led insight into key areas.

Assessment

  • Examination - spring semester: 80%
  • Practical-based assessment: 10%
  • Written assessment: 10%
Module codeBI3318
LevelL6
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits20

This module will provide the students with an understanding of current, cutting-edge topics of research in systems neuroscience taught by members of staff whose own research is in the same or a related area. Students will be exposed to controversies and key hypotheses in each topic and be put in a position to form their own opinions on those.

Precursor Module: BI2357 Special Senses

Assessment

  • Examination - spring semester: 80%
  • Written assessment: 20%
Module codeBI3319
LevelL6
SemesterSpring Semester
Credits20

The course focuses on current research in Tissue engineering using as examples procedures applied to musculoskeletal tissue pathology. Students will gain an understanding of the basic principles applied to tissue engineering procedures for functional replacement of diseased or injured organs and tissues of the body.

Assessment

  • Examination - spring semester: 80%
  • Class test: 10%
  • Class test: 10%
Module codeBI3321
LevelL6
SemesterDouble Semester
Credits20

This module describes various aspects of the musculoskeletal system and its adaptations in initiating and controlling human movement, at cell, tissue and whole body levels.

Precursor Modules: Either BI2306 Cells, Tissues and the Extracellular Matrix or BI2257 Molecular Cell Biology

Assessment

  • Examination - spring semester: 80%
  • Written assessment: 20%
Module codeBI3325
LevelL6
SemesterDouble Semester
Credits20

The course will provide students with an understanding of key biomedical aspects of some common cancer types such as pathology, screening and prevention and diagnostics and prognosis. The module will also cover the cellular and molecular mechanisms that underpin the biology of solid and haematological cancers. The importance of such cellular and molecular knowledge with respect to identifying valid anti-cancer targets will be emphasised and how this leads to the subsequent rational design of novel anti-cancer therapeutics. With respect to drug development, the course will also provide an understanding of clinical trial design and how studies translate from the laboratory into the clinical setting. The course will also highlight the role of the stem cell in tumour biology and therapeutics.

Precursor Module: BI2257 Molecular Cell Biology

Assessment

  • Examination - spring semester: 80%
  • Written assessment: 20%
Module codeBI3326
LevelL6
SemesterDouble Semester
Credits20

This module will provide final year Neuroscience students with a comprehensive overview of the molecular, cellular and behavioural mechanisms underlying major neurological and psychiatric disorders.  Initially the course will deal with drug addiction and the major drugs classes will be described, highlighting similarities and differences in their mode of action and in their addictive potential. Subsequently, the major psychiatric conditions will be described, including affective disorders, anxiety and stress disorders and psychosis. In addition, basic mechanism of learning and memory will be integrated with some knowledge related to Intellectual Disabilities and the recent development of cognitive enhancers. Finally, neurological disorders will be discussed, including motor disorders (Parkinson’s and Huntington’s Disease) and dementias. A major emphasis will be directed to the analysis of the available animal models of these disorders.

Precursor Modules: BI2301 Human Neuroanatomy and BI2304 Membrane and Synaptic Physiology and BI2322 Physiology and Pharmacology of the CNS and PS2017 Biological Psychology

Assessment

  • Examination - spring semester: 70%
  • Practical-based assessment: 30%
Module codeBI3327
LevelL6
SemesterDouble Semester
Credits20

This module provides practical experience, application, knowledge and understanding of gross and functional anatomy of the human head and neck.

Precursor Modules: BI2323 Human Anatomy - Trunk and BI2358 Human Anatomy - Limbs

Assessment

  • Examination - spring semester: 50%
  • Written assessment: 20%
  • Practical-based assessment: 30%
Module codeBI3329
LevelL6
SemesterDouble Semester
Credits20

An advanced course in human physiology and pathophysiology of the cardiovascular, renal, gastrointestinal, respiratory and endocrine systems, which heavily draws from current research. The students will be expected to critically appraise and present research papers in the form of oral presentations and written assessment.

Precursor Module: BI2303 Human Pathophysiology

Assessment

  • Examination - spring semester: 70%
  • Class test: 30%
Module codeBI3330
LevelL6
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits20

The course focuses mainly on the cellular and molecular mechanisms underpinning a range of human diseases. In addition, students will also gain an understanding of both the current and developmental therapies that are being used to treat the various disorders.  The course will also highlight how the knowledge of such disease mechanisms and the subsequent therapeutic strategies has been achieved through multidisciplinary biomedical research.

Maximum number on module: 100

Assessment

  • Examination - spring semester: 80%
  • Written assessment: 20%
Module codeBI3331
LevelL6
SemesterAutumn Semester
Credits20

The course focuses mainly on the cellular and molecular processes underpinning a range of human diseases. In addition, students will also gain an understanding of both the current and developmental therapies that are being used to treat the various disorders.  The course will also highlight how the knowledge of such disease processes and the subsequent therapeutic strategies has been achieved through multidisciplinary biomedical research.

Maximum number on module: 100

Assessment

  • Examination - spring semester: 80%
  • Written assessment: 20%